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The Wind [VHS]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Lillian Gish, Lars Hanson, Montagu Love, Dorothy Cumming, Edward Earle
  • Directors: Victor Sjöström
  • Writers: Dorothy Scarborough, Frances Marion
  • Producers: David Gill, Kevin Brownlow
  • Format: Black & White, NTSC
  • Language: English
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: MGM/UA Home Video
  • VHS Release Date: May 18, 1999
  • Run Time: 78 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6301976096
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #184,286 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

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Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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If you like desert films.
Amazon Customer
It is a wonderful ending of living side by side with the sometimes harsh personality of nature, which can also be a friend.
Bobby Underwood
It seems like they just quickly threw together the new ending without much forethought.
mwreview

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on September 21, 2003
Format: VHS Tape Verified Purchase
Filmed at the end of the silent era, this movie is considered to be one of the last of the great silents. It's ironic that the genre was perfected just when sound was ready to take over.
Lillian Gish, though she faces stiff competition, is generally regarded as the finest actress of the silent era and this film is an ideal way to see her at her best. She plays Lettie, a sheltered girl who is forced to move to her cousin's home on the windswept prairie. Beverly is thrilled to see her but his wife, Cora, is instantly jealous of the dainty Gish. In her few scenes, Dorothy Cummings does a good job of portraying Cora's unfair but understandable jealousy.
Finally, Cora expels Lettie from her home. Since the seemingly kind man she met on the train is already married, Lettie weds Lige, a somewhat silly but friendly local man who is pleased and flattered to have such a pretty bride. Swedish actor Lars Hanson is great in a very difficult role. He manages to come across as likable but one still understands why Lettie is not in love with him.
All the while, the persistent wind blows and starts to drive Lettie insane. Director Victor Seastrom creates a marvelous atmosphere of despair.
The MGM presentation features an introduction by Lillian Gish and has an excellent orchestral score that is both appropriate and enjoyable. The print quality is good. Too bad it's out of print, maybe it will be released on DVD soon.
Good if: You are a fan of Lillian Gish, Lars Hanson or Victor Seastrom (or Sjostrom in Sweden) If you love a good silent film. If you like desert films. (This was filmed in the Mojave Desert, California) If you like psychological drama
Not good if: You dislike silent films, you don't like westerns, you don't like the ending.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Christoph Berner on February 24, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
Truly one of the last great classics of the silent era, "The Wind" is an outstanding film throughout helped by an excellent cast (Lillian Gish and Lars Hanson), the legendary director Victor Seastrom and an intelligent and very dynamic script which tells of a young woman facing a hostile environment in the old west, a recurring theme in American silent movies of those days. The movie is further given a special treatment by Miss Lillian Gish (probably silent cinema`s most beautiful and gracious actress), especially in the dramatic climax which almost contains a certain element of horror. Anyway this is one of MGM`s greatest silent films (in the same category as "Greed") and the restoration by "silent" experts Brownlow and Gill is very good (plus the dramatic Carl Davis score) .... oh, this were the times when the lion roared ...
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Barbara Yerby on December 10, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
A young girl from Virginia must live with distant relatives in Texas until she is married. The drastic change of culture eventually becomes more than she can handle.Anyone who has experienced such a change, or anyone who lives in Texas or like areas, can appreciate what she must endure. The story is captivating and suspenseful. The book's ending varies drastically from the movie.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By John Potter on September 24, 2010
Format: VHS Tape
This is one of the great films of the silent era, made just as the "Talkies" were on the horizon. It is gripping and has almost no melodramatics about it, and it's a crime that it hasn't been fully restored and come out in DVD, preferably with the great score provided by Carl Davis.

It is also Lillian Gish at the height of her career, the finest and most beautiful actress to ever grace any screen. It is her most mature role, after all the adolescent roles she played for D.W. Griffith, and under the direction of Victor Sjostrom (who towards the end of his life would star in Ingmar Bergman's "Wild Strawberries) she is able to pull out all the stops without resorting to the big exaggerated gesturing of the Griffith years. She can do it all with the biggest, most expressive eyes on the screen: happiness, misery, boredom, and terror.

As a penniless orphan named Lette, she has come from the lush green hills of Virginia to live with her cousin Beverly (A male cousin named Beverly? Or am I missing something) in the desert wastelands of Sweet Water, Texas, an ironic name for a place that has virtully no water! It is also a place of torrential winds that never cease, and the heady one that is blowing when Lette arrives is just a mild summer breeze compared to what will come later. Because of the wind, dirt and sand get into everything, even in the food people eat. At one point in the film Lette is using a box full of sand to wash the dishes in! (We who live in the Southwest often get torrential winds in the late Spring and early Summer, and all we can do is tolerate it while the tourists go on enjoying themselves at calmer times. Dust and pollen seep in everywhere.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Polkadotty on June 24, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
Other reviewers have more expertise concerning silent cinema, and state succinctly the background of this film. So I shall add only one small opinion to the others. Simply this: Lettie wandering off into the desert would have been the better conclusion. The author of the original book understood this, and wrote it into his novel. Here's a poor dear that's had so much on her plate: loveless marriage, murder, distate from relatives, horrible weather, jealousy, culture shock, &tc. Such high drama would dent most anyone's armour. The sweet tied-up ending might have allowed audiences to leave the theaters relieved and all in smiles, but it doesn't fit. This is melodrama! Pull out all the stops and do it correctly. Be that as it may, Miss Gish is outstanding in her role, a consummate tragedienne, as mentioned by another reviewer. And so beautiful to look at, pure pleasure to watch on the screen. Wrong-ended and all, this film belongs in your collection if you have any interest in silents whatsoever.
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