Qty:1
  • List Price: $35.00
  • Save: $11.32 (32%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by BigHeartedBooks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Book is in very good condition, there may be some minor wear from a prior reader or two but very good books are in excellent condition. Super fast shipping is available and we offer a money back guarantee.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $3.38
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Wind in the Willows: An Annotated Edition Hardcover – May 31, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-0674034471 ISBN-10: 0674034473 Edition: Annotated

Buy New
Price: $23.68
29 New from $21.00 24 Used from $11.88 2 Collectible from $23.00
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$23.68
$21.00 $11.88
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

The Wind in the Willows: An Annotated Edition + The Annotated Wind in the Willows (The Annotated Books) + The Annotated Alice: The Definitive Edition
Price for all three: $76.27

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

The Bone Clocks
David Mitchell's hypnotic new novel crackles with invention and sheer storytelling pleasure. Learn more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 9 and up
  • Grade Level: 4 and up
  • Hardcover: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Belknap Press; Annotated edition (May 31, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0674034473
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674034471
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 9.3 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #180,614 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Lerer's annotated edition of The Wind in the Willows not only seeks to respond to every possible question a contemporary reader (of any age) might pose, but it goes beyond that aim to make the most penetrating and astute interpretive asides, and it does so economically, judiciously, and--what is most delightful--in a graceful prose of its own that matches the gleaming poetic style of Kenneth Grahame himself and thus honors him both in form and content. (Ellen Handler Spitz, author of The Brightening Glance: Imagination and Childhood)

The Wind in the Willows is one of the few books that inspires unconditional reverence, and it has long deserved a guide as sensitive, deft, insightful, and generous as Seth Lerer. Here, Toad, Rat, Mole, and other characters come alive for both adult and inner child. A splendid achievement. (Maria Tatar, Harvard University)

You might think it a bit extreme to painstakingly annotate a children's book, but, oh, what a children's book. And oh, what an annotation...[This] is an exquisite examination of the nuances, allusions, Britishisms and context of Kenneth Grahame's wonderful 1908 novel...This big, lovely book is illustrated by some of the most famous Grahame illustrators--Nancy Barnhart, Arthur Rackham, Wyndham Payne and, of course, Ernest H. Shepherd, who brought to life the brash, cigar-smoking, swaggering Mr. Toad. This book is a labor of great scholarship, but it is also, clearly, a labor of love. (Laurie Hertzel Minneapolis Star-Tribune 2009-05-15)

A handsome edition of Grahame's great classic...One of the delights of this edition is the collection of beautiful illustrations from each edition, from Nancy Barnhart's wonderful 1922 version to Arthur Rackham's in 1940, as well as Paul Bransom's deliciously weird 1913 images for Scribner's. (Lawrence Osborne Forbes 2009-05-07)

Lerer's book perform[s] magic. [It] demonstrates how much of a writer's life can wind up distilled in a stack of paper--in this case, how Kenneth Grahame's daydreams, fears, heartbreak, upbringing, era and locale all sneaked into a fanciful children's book about talking animals. In what other book can you find slapstick auto theft, a dirge for lost arcadia and a numinous encounter with that pagan refugee and mascot of the Edwardian neo-romantics, the great god Pan?...Lerer's preface is a thoughtful and elegant survey of the biographical and literary context for this beloved book. (Michael Sims Washington Post Book World 2009-06-14)

[An] exquisite new annotated edition of Kenneth Grahame's masterpiece...It takes us into a pre-modern world of lyrical beauty, with animals that behave like humans, landscapes that are painted for us rather than described, and language more literary than spoken...Rereading this volume, which Harvard University Press has given all the high production values it deserves, led me to understand more fully the soporific effects of The Wind in the Willows on children. Under the spell of an artist who animates his fictional world with something akin to solar energy ("Suddenly the sun was with them again, and grey was gold and colour was born and sprang out of the earth once more"), readers enter dreaded conflict zones but always return to that consummate comfort zone known as Home...By turns ecstatic and elegiac, and always without pathos, sentiment or pyrotechnics, The Wind in the Willows is also always there, ready to provide us, when we feel lost, with all the comforts of Home. (Maria Tatar Globe and Mail 2009-06-20)

[A] handsome edition...[Lerer] provides a wealth of information that will be welcomed by anyone who wants return to the riverbank and discover just how enduring and endearing Grahame's masterpiece remains a century after it was published. (Peter Parker Times Literary Supplement 2009-06-26)

For all its apparent celebration of neatness and domestic orderliness The Wind in the Willows is really a book about letting go. It begins with Mole, tired of spring cleaning, putting aside his whitewash brush and taking to the road, and its true hero is Toad, who is anarchy incarnate. (Charles McGrath New York Times Book Review 2009-07-10)

An enduring masterpiece of children's literature. (Bill Ruehlmann Virginian-Pilot 2009-07-26)

Full of luminous little notes on the story. (Robert Pincus Sign On San Diego 2009-05-28)

The pages have a slight gloss, the typeface is elegant; the margins are pleasingly wide, and the annotations are terse, informative, and properly infrequent...The images are also well chosen...Reading Lerer's edition is a great pleasure. The notes are there when you need them and are easy to ignore when you don't. This book is, among other things, a delightful testimony to the bookmaker's art...His edition will be the one I return to when the book, as it often does, calls out to me and in its quiet and gracious tones requests my attention. (Alan Jacobs First Things 2009-10-01)

This annotated version of the children's classic holds a college course's worth of information between its covers. Giving the gift of Toad's adventures with Rat and Mole will always be, and always has been, an appreciated gift. This edition, however, takes the reader deeper into the world of The Wind in the Willows with relevant annotations and cultural contexts. This book deserves a spot on the bookshelf to be enjoyed by the old and young alike. Revisited, or newly discovered, Kenneth Grahame continues to inspire imaginations. (Katharine Wray popmatters.com 2009-12-15)

Seth Lerer steps in to educate and entertain in this delightful new edition of a timeless classic. In the generously spaced margins running along the outer side of each page Lerer provides the etymological origins of words, the references and influences that Grahame drew upon to create his stories, and a description of the flora and fauna of Great Britain...Whether readers are nostalgic for the stories of their childhood or looking to experience The Wind in the Willows in an entirely new fashion, this is a book that simply can't be passed up. (Kate Maruska San Antonio Book Review 2010-01-21)

About the Author

Seth Lerer is Dean of Arts and Humanities and Distinguished Professor of Literature at the University of California at San Diego.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
5 star
8
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
1
See all 10 customer reviews
The book is really lovely with great illustrations.
Easy Reader
It is safe to say that few would contest that The Wind in the Willows is one of the most beloved works of children's literature ever written.
San Antonio Book Review
I got this as a gift for a baby shower; it is one of my favorite stories and this is a beautiful edition.
sue

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

46 of 48 people found the following review helpful By John Klima on May 1, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This edition, published by Harvard/Belknap, reproduces E.H. Shepard's wonderful line drawings and contains a color gallery of work by many of the best, most praised illustrators of The Wind in the Willows. It's a beautiful object you'll want to own and treasure. The notes by Seth Lerer -- who just won the NBCC award for his history of children's literature -- are superb, often rising to the level of short essays. Here is Lerer, for example, on "spring cleaning" and the novel's famous opening sentence: "The phrase emerged in the late Victorian period. Houses and apartments would have been turned out and cleaned at least once a year... It clearly marks a turn in the late-19th century domestic habits, one keyed to the gradual move away from the domestic space defined by objects and clutter to a space defined by cleanliness. The symbolic resonances, too, are obvious: spring is a time of renewal, of clearing out the past, and of refreshness. The OED offers this quotation form The Pall Mall Gazette of 1889: 'There are a few points of mutual sympathy between the poet and the spring cleaner.' Grahame begins the story, then, by clearing out the past and making a fresh start. But he also introduces one of the governing conceits of the story: that his main characters, even though they are animals, live in a comfortably familiar domestic world." A lovely edition.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
52 of 56 people found the following review helpful By W. J. Hunter on September 16, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
There are two recent annotated versions of "The Wind in the Willows", and I have only read this one, so this review isn't meant to be a comparison. Indeed, I chose Mr. Lerer's version because of its higher customer rating on Amazon.com. However, now that I've completed it, I am left hoping the other author's version is better.

In short, these annotations just seem a bit perfunctory. Most of them are simple transcriptions from the OED, explaining the meaning and origin of obscure words. That, of course, is helpful, but lacks the imagination and ingenuity of, say, Martin Gardner's "The Annotated Alice", which really delves into the depth and meaning of Lewis Carroll's classic. At his worst, Lerer composes certain presumptions as facts, when they are occasionally rather poor guesses. In one section, he pronounces that Badger's house is an old church, whereas the prose leads most to believe Badger lives in a Roman ruin. All annotators make presumptions of course, but it is imperative to word them as such so readers aren't misled.

The book is not without its strengths. Lerer's introduction is insightful, and the book is beautifully printed, with buttery paper and nicely printed illustrations. On the whole, it's not a bad book, I just wish more time was spent honing and refining it, making sure it was worthy of Grahame's original.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By San Antonio Book Review on January 22, 2010
Format: Hardcover
It is safe to say that few would contest that The Wind in the Willows is one of the most beloved works of children's literature ever written. Children today love it, their parents loved it, their grandparents and even their great-great-grandparents loved it. The stories captured the hearts of young and old alike back in 1908, and over 100 years later the same still holds true. Turns of phrase and names of items that were commonplace at the turn of the 20th century are now charming and antiquated -- and very often confusing for the average modern day reader.

Seth Lerer steps in to educate and entertain in this delightful new edition of a timeless classic. In the generously spaced margins running along the outer side of each page Lerer provides the etymological origins of words, the references and influences that Grahame drew upon to create his stories, and a description of the flora and fauna of Great Britain. In Chapter 1, he goes into detail about the Victorian trend of picnicking; later in Chapter 7 he notes the influence that Romantic poets, Keats in particular, had on Grahame's choice of words. And in the middle of the book there's a 16 page spread of glossy, full color images of the covers and illustrations of past editions.

Whether readers are nostalgic for the stories of their childhood or looking to experience The Wind in the Willows in an entirely new fashion, this is a book that simply can't be passed up.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Suzanna Burnham on May 2, 2012
Format: Hardcover
I grew up with Kenneth Graham's The Wind in the Willows, and the version I loved as a chi;d was illustrated by Earnest Shepherd. When I discovered that there was an annotated printing that also included information and samples from the myriad of other illustrators who had worked on this story over the years, as well as a forward and side comments by Seth Lerer--whose Inventing English: A Portable History of the Language I think is a wonderful book--I had to buy The Wind in the Willows: An Annotated Edition. I was not disappointed, and neither will you be.

Whether you (or your child) is new to the magical world of Rat, Mole and Mr. Toad, or they are old friends for you as they are for me, you will appreciate the loving care with which this volume was created. Kenneth Graham's story can of course stand alone, as can Earnest Shepherd's wonderful drawings, but put together with Professor Lerer's insightful comments this is just the best version of this classic available.

Highly recommended for all!
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?