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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent South American minimalism
I was waiting for there to be a solid film like this showing the subtle ends to a distinguished life. A minimalist film all the way, right down to there being little to no dialogue for ten minutes at a time. The background sounds relayed some of the scenes eloquently, including the constant piano tuning, nature sounds, a grandfather clock and more.

We get to...
Published on June 19, 2009 by Steve Kuehl

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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The Window
This movie would be painfully slow for most US audiences. To me, it was a minute study of the uneventful.
Published on February 15, 2010 by William T. Sublette


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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent South American minimalism, June 19, 2009
This review is from: The Window (DVD)
I was waiting for there to be a solid film like this showing the subtle ends to a distinguished life. A minimalist film all the way, right down to there being little to no dialogue for ten minutes at a time. The background sounds relayed some of the scenes eloquently, including the constant piano tuning, nature sounds, a grandfather clock and more.

We get to watch a heart attack survivor live out his recovery time at a beautiful country estate (filmed in the Patagonia region I believe). His restless wit is offset by the overbearing nursing staff, ambiguous family and beautiful solitude. Well filmed and very reminiscent of how I see things for me when those days arrive.

As usual for Film Movement, the DVD includes an excellent and relevant short film about similar emotions, some great previews and other company related materials. Subtle, yet beautiful, hope you enjoy it.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Powerful and Hopeful Story Explores the Spiritual Gifts of Aging, August 22, 2009
This review is from: The Window (DVD)
"The Window" proves the universal appeal of well-made movies. Carlos Sorín's story is set in Patagonia, yet the rolling ranch on which the aging patriarch lives could be a setting out of a Western in the American Plains. As Antonio, the patriarch, prepares for the return of his beloved son, this could be a character envisioned by Hemingway or Faulkner or John Ford.

What turns this into great cinema is that Sorín paints his story with his camera. There's a 10-minute segment in which the old man, who has been bedridden for a long time, suddenly feels such inspiration that he decides to walk through his gardens and fields once again. It's an almost wordless sequence, yet you won't move a muscle as it unfolds.

Watch how tantalizing memories and stories emerge as the big house is cleaned for the son's visit. And, toward the end of the film, watch how the father's vision paints scenes in the house--and how the son's vision paints similar scenes.

While the film may sound simple and the story may sound somber, you'll find a whole lot to discuss after it ends-exploring how the scenes from various perspectives merge and separate spiritually. "The Window" elevates the whole reflection on aging to a different, deeper level-pointing toward gifts within this universal journey.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A day in the life - Argentinean style, January 7, 2013
This review is from: The Window (DVD)
"The Window" (2008 release from Argentina; 80 min.) brings the story of an 80 yr. old man (played by Antonio Larreta) who lives on a large estate somewhere in remote Argentina. His health is failing him, but he is excited as his long-estranged son, now a successful piano concertist based in Europe, is coming home to visit him. To tell you much more of the already very simple plot would ruin your viewing experience, you'll just have to see for yourself how it all plays out.

Several comments: this is a gorgous "little movie", basically a painting in motion. Check out at the opening when the house of the old man first comes into focus: inititally it's hard to distinguish, then it looks grayish and foggy, but then eventually it fully reveals itself in bright yellow and red. This type of scene is repeated time and again in the movie: the camera is stationed and the scene reveals itself slowly but surely. Antonio Larreta is magnificent as the old man staring into his own mortality. Without giving any further spoilers, I felt that the arrival of the old man's son comes too little, too late into the movie, as by then the full picture really had been revelead and the visit almost becomes irrelevant, or at best an afterthought.

That aside, this is a beautifully crafted and understated movie that will reward anyone not in a hurry. I should also mention that I am a big fan of the Film Movement library of indie and foreign movies (I finally gave in last year and started my subscription of the DVD of the Month series). "The Window" is another winning entry in the rich Film Movement catalog. Bottom line, this is MILES away from your standard Hollywood fare, but if you are in the mood for a qaulity foreign movie, "The Window" is HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars The Window, February 15, 2010
By 
William T. Sublette (Southern California, USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: The Window (DVD)
This movie would be painfully slow for most US audiences. To me, it was a minute study of the uneventful.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Lovely, January 28, 2012
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SRH (Tennessee) - See all my reviews
This film is lovely-beyond words. In a way that evokes a quiet surrender to the prospect of death. The cast is fantastic in the way they each hit their mark to create a soothing melody of keen performances.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Painting a Last Day of Life, January 5, 2010
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This review is from: The Window (DVD)
LA VENTANA (THE WINDOW) is a gentle masterpiece of cinema written and directed by Carlos Carlos Sorín . It is about living and dying and how, hopefully, we all can approach that last day on earth. Filmed in Argentina's Patagonia by cinematographer Julian Apezteguia with an emphasis on sunshine and landscape this little film humbly presents the final day of living of 80-year-old writer Antonio (Antonio Larreta) who has been confined to bed in his home after a heart attack (his warmly caring doctor advises him to be hospitalized, but Antonio seems to appreciate the futility of that move). He is attended by two women - María del Carmen (María del Carmen Jiménez) and Emilse (Emilse Roldán) - who prepare his meals and his medications and cut his hair and keep his old home clean. Antonio is frisky and more than anything wants to walk in his vegetable garden he watches through his bedside window. He calls upon a piano tuner to tune his ancient piano in preparation for the visit of his son Pablo (Jorge Díez), a famous concert pianist, who is due to arrive with his girlfriend Claudia (Carla Peterson) after a very long absence. Antonio finally decides to take a walk in his garden and his land, longing to once again feel a part of nature. He stumbles, is unable to get up, and is found by neighbors who bring him home. After seeing his son, and after recalling a repeated dream of the lovely woman who served as his nanny, Antonio simply goes to sleep, happy and serene.

There is no story to this beautiful film, Instead it is just a day in the life of a man who has lived a good life and accepts his dying with great dignity and happiness. Each of the actors in this elegy is perfect for the simple roles. But it is the performance by Antonio Larreta under Carlos Carlos Sorín's direction that makes this film soar, quietly and with profound respect for the art of living and of dying. It is a little masterpiece. Grady Harp, January 10
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The Window
The Window by Carlos Sorn (DVD - 2009)
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