The Wisdom to Doubt: a justification of religious skepticism and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $55.95
  • Save: $13.60 (24%)
Only 1 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by monarchbooksusa
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Hardcover With Dust Jacket, Condition: Very Good (book) /Very Good (jacket).
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $2.01
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Wisdom to Doubt: A Justification of Religious Skepticism Hardcover – May 17, 2007


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$42.35
$30.00 $14.58


NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 342 pages
  • Publisher: Cornell University Press (May 17, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 080144554X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0801445545
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,925,220 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Schellenberg's book provides an interesting and thought provoking case for Categorical Religious Skepticism. . . . Like his other books, The Wisdom to Doubt is well written and clear. Helpful charts and figures facilitate a better understanding of the text. His arguments become clearer and easier to grasp, and more challenging, the more time one spends thinking through them. I encourage readers to carefully attend to his arguments or risk missing a good opportunity to be challenged."—Erik Baldwin, Kinesis



"This is a brilliant work, full of original thinking and unhurriedly persuasive argument. The project it carries forward is a major new departure in the philosophy of religion, and should break much of the deadlock in contemporary debate."—Terence Penelhum, University of Calgary

"The Wisdom to Doubt is extraordinarily well structured; moreover, it is stuffed with powerful arguments that are passionately expressed and enlightening. Those who are serious about the philosophy of religion will have to come to terms with it."—Daniel Howard-Snyder, Western Washington University

"The Wisdom to Doubt is a major contribution to the philosophical discussion of religion and carries profound import for anyone interested in the study of religious phenomena. Schellenberg's construction of 'an edifice of doubt' here embraces a generalized religious skepticism that includes the claims of a naturalism prone to overestimating the accomplishments of science and underestimating the potential of religion. The book provides a sophisticated and systematic treatment of the arguments for and against the existence of an ultimate salvific reality, and in the process reveals a wisdom in rising above religious and irreligious belief which are both just 'too neat and tidy, too smooth and definite for our world.' In showing that it is 'abundantly clear that the truth about religion is unclear' Schellenberg provides a basis for different kinds of study of religion and religions that will appeal to many scholars within and beyond the walls of philosophy."—Donald Wiebe, Trinity College, University of Toronto

From the Back Cover

"The Wisdom to Doubt is extraordinarily well structured; moreover, it is stuffed with powerful arguments that are passionately expressed and enlightening. Those who are serious about the philosophy of religion will have to come to terms with it."--Daniel Howard-Snyder, Western Washington University

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
2
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 3 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A. Customer on September 28, 2009
Format: Hardcover
John Schellenberg's book is a highly original and interesting piece of philosophy. His topic is "Ultimism"--the claim that there is an ultimate reality, and that it is salvific in nature. His main thesis will be that we should "sit the fence" epistemically regarding Ultimism--neither affirming it nor denying it. The first part of his book contains four different defenses of this thesis--arguing from, among other things, the object of Ultimism (is it knowable or unknowable by humans?), our evidence for Ultimism, human inability to appropriate experience the divine, etc. In the second part of his book, Schellenberg engages arguments for naturalism, and arguments from religious experience for theism. Naturalism, of course, denies Ultimism, and theism affirms it. Schellenberg argues that neither can support their respective theses-- "Ultimism is false" and "Ultimism is true"-- and attempts to undercut both. In the third part of his book, Schellenberg provides four arguments against theism--two versions of his "divine hiddenness" argument, an argument for horrors, and an argument from the existence of free will. His thought here is that, even if Ultimism may be true, the theistic version of Ultimism must be false.

This book has many virtues. Many of the arguments are original and interesting. The book can be appreciated at different levels, from professional philosophers to undergraduates. He treats many issues in epistemology, including Plantinga and Alston's religious epistemology, "skeptical" theism, the nature of evidence, etc. Schellenberg's treatment of naturalism is particularly interesting. Further, contained within is his most sophisticated formulation of the problem of hiddenness--i.e.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
16 of 21 people found the following review helpful By John W. Loftus VINE VOICE on July 3, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book is a very important work by a top-notch philosopher who argues for "complete religious skepticism." He argues against any belief in "ultimism," which is based upon religious claims that entail "there is an ultimate and salvic reality." (p.3). In his words, "the categorical skepticism I am defending, as the name suggests, is doubt that embraces any and all religious claims," whether it's "religious belief" or religious disbelief." (p. 50) He says "our skeptic is not just an agnostic. (Indeed, his stance is compatible with atheism, since...atheism does not entail the denial of ultimism.)" (p. 3)

The book contains three parts and is not as technical as one would think. You won't find any symbolic logic to worry about deciphering. The arguments are understandable to the college student. You might first have to wade through the "Introduction" where he defines various terms he uses, although, if you've read his previous book, Prolegomena to a Philosophy of Religion (Ithaca: Cornell, 2005), you would already be familiar with them.

In Part One he argues for religious skepticism based on four distinct categories of thought called "modes," which he later combines into one. In the "Subject Mode" the author argues that human beings are limited in understanding. There is available evidence that is neglected and/or inaccessible to us. There is unrecognized evidence that is undiscovered and undiscoverable by all of us. In the "Object Mode" the author argues that it's probably beyond finite humans beings to understand Ultimate reality, since it must be "something infinitely profound." (p. 51) As such, we may have inadequate and incoherent conceptions of it.

In the "Retrospective Mode" the author considers the human past with regard to religious claims.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 13 people found the following review helpful By César González Rouco on December 2, 2007
Format: Hardcover
I felt attracted by this book assuming it would offer a far deeper discussion on religion that many of the pro-atheism books that have been dominating the best-seller lists in recent months. I was right: it is densily deep. So I will try to succinctly point out some of the main ideas supported by Schellenberg [and given that Mr. Loftus' review is excellent, I will also add some bibliography that -hopefully - will be of some use for those interesting in religion].

Pursuant to Schallenberg, we may simply be incapable of discerning truths about ultimate things. He intends to bring into stark contrast the poverty of human awareness and the huge ambitions of religious and irreligious belief. The immaturity of human beings shows that religious and irreligious beliefs are premature. Both our limitations and our immaturity betrays serious overconfidence and invites a charge of presumption.

There must have been many reflective personas in times past who have wondered why God's existence is not more evident than it is. This the author calls Divine hiddenness, and argues that perfect relational-personal love would lead a Divine creator to prevent nonresistant nonbelief of any kind because of how such nonbelief precludes access to personal relationship to God. Additionally, revisiting what has been called the "logical" problem of evil, he develops that idea that if a perfectly loving and empathic God can achieve even our deepest good without permitting horrific sufferings as does exist in our world, such God would not permit horrific suffering.

Schellenberg states that whatever one might think of the force of his arguments, their very existence suffices to provide strong extra support for religious skepticism (in particular, skepticism about theism -i.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search