The Wisdom of Stability: Rooting Faith in a Mobile Culture and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$12.48
Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.99
  • Save: $2.51 (17%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 11 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Wisdom of Stability: Rooting Faith in a Mobile Culture Paperback – May 1, 2010


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.48
$3.99 $3.98

Frequently Bought Together

The Wisdom of Stability: Rooting Faith in a Mobile Culture + The Awakening of Hope: Why We Practice a Common Faith + The Intentional Christian Community Handbook: For Idealists, Hypocrites, and Wannabe Disciples of Jesus
Price for all three: $37.84

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 164 pages
  • Publisher: Paraclete Press (May 1, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557256233
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557256232
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.3 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #156,996 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Although commitment to the traditional Christian virtue of stability isn't easy, it is the best way to encounter both the God who invites humans into community -- and, for the faithful, to do battle with the personal and societal demons that keep them from deeper faith. Cofounder of the "new monastic" community Rutba House in Durham, N.C., and author of God's Economy, Wilson-Hartgrove argues candidly that his aim is to persuade readers to "reprogram your default settings" from mobility to stability. Drawing deeply upon the work and witness of Benedictines both ancient and modern, the writer also roots his argument in Scripture and snapshots taken from the economically poor community where he and his family have chosen to live. In a fortunate coincidence, this slim volume advocating the virtue of "growing where you are planted" appears at a time when more are inclined to challenge the necessity and advantage of multitasking. Wilson-Hartgrove tends to repeat his main point, but he does it in such an engaging and passionate way that readers will go away well-informed, if not converted.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

In contemporary culture, staying put—actively maintaining stability—is often looked down upon. Stability is the antithesis, according to this viewpoint, of progress and innovation. Wilson-Hartgrove disagrees and sets out to persuade his readers to reconsider their busy lifestyles. He suggests that by paying attention, we can recover the “wisdom of stability.” Thus, he refers back to the wisdom literature of various cultures, from Lao-tzu and the Bible to the desert monastics and Thomas Merton. He refers to specific traditions, such as Benedictine spirituality, while at the same time insisting that stability can be looked on as a craft, as a rhythm to fall into—and something that can be learned by anyone. “To practice stability,” he writes, “is to learn to love both a place and its people.” He comments on lessons he has learned from the Bible as well as stories shared by family members, friends, and colleagues and concludes with a series of quotations on stability from famous saints and scholars, including Augustine of Hippo, Pierre Teilhard de Chardin, and Sister Joan Chittister. An appealing combination of personal experience and reflection. --June Sawyers

More About the Author

Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove is a celebrated spiritual author and sought-after speaker. A native of North Carolina, he is a graduate of Eastern University and Duke Divinity School.

In 2003, Jonathan and his wife Leah founded the Rutba House, a house of hospitality where the formerly homeless are welcomed into a community that eats, prays, and shares life together. Jonathan directs the School for Conversion, an organization that has grown out of the life of Rutba House to pursue beloved community with kids in their neighborhood, through classes in North Carolina prisons, and in community-based education around the country. He is also an Associate Minister at the historically black St. Johns Missionary Baptist Church.

Jonathan is a co-complier of the celebrated Common Prayer: A Liturgy for Ordinary Radicals, and is the author of several books on Christian spirituality, including The Awakening of Hope, The Wisdom of Stability, and The New Monasticism.

An evangelical Christian who connects with the broad spiritual tradition and its monastic witnesses, Jonathan is a leader in the New Monasticism movement. He speaks often about emerging Christianity to churches and conferences across the denominational spectrum and has given lectures at dozens of universities, including Calvin College, Bethel University, Duke University, Swarthmore College, St. John's University, DePaul University, and Baylor University.

Connect with Jonathan at www.jonathanwilsonhartgrove.com

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
13
4 star
6
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 19 customer reviews
Don't wait too long, the hour is now!
Thomas Johnson-Medland
It is questions like these that Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove tackles in his latest book, The Wisdom of Stability: Rooting Faith in a Mobile Culture.
S. Norris
The book is beautiful, simple, homespun and wise.
Pat Loughery

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Englewood Review of Books on May 4, 2010
Format: Paperback
[ This review originally appeared in
THE ENGLEWOOD REVIEW OF BOOKS - 30 April 2010 ]

Transience is a major curse of our age. From those who are always on the move to avoid their creditors to the upwardly mobile who are always seeking greener pastures, it seems that everyone is on the move. In our urban neighborhood, it is a fairly common practice for renters to move into a new place, paying the first month's rent, and then forego paying the second month's rent, and then at the end of the second month when their account is 30 days past due, the eviction process is started and the renter then has 30 days until they are evicted. Thus, crafty renters can get three months worth of housing for the price of one month, and force themselves into a cycle of moving every three months (or more if they are able to scrape together more than a single month's rent). These habits have larger cultural implications; I have heard of a public school in our neighborhood that has turnover rates as high as 95% from one year to the next (i.e., only 5 % of the students who started in a grade one year were still at the school a year later). Lest I get too critical, it occurred to me recently that I myself have, in the last 15 years (since the summer before my senior year of college), lived at a staggering twelve addresses in four different states! Thankfully, I have been fortunate to live in the same house for the last six years, and have no intention of moving any time soon, and am slowly learning here about the historic Christian practice of stability.

Given the great mobility of American culture, it is not surprising that stability is virtually unknown in our churches today.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Christopher Heuertz on April 20, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Wisdom of Stability is thick with story and packed with real-life practical application. It's grounded in the ancient practice of stability, embodied and legitimized by monastic and cloistered communities that lived the value of staying put. At the same time, Jonathan avoids a formulaic tendency to reduce stability to merely staying put in a specific location, and he re-narrates a fuller vision of stability as an orientation--one grounded in faith, vocation and community.

The book is well thought through and brilliantly organized. Jonathan's reflections meander through the complexities of rooting in a time and cultural context that seems to avoid making commitments. It's confessional, inquisitive and beautifully honest. The book is an invitation into a conversation that we must find the courage to engage.

I've appreciated this book more than any other I've read this year. The Wisdom of Stability couldn't be more timely.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Lisa N. Hickman on April 20, 2010
Format: Paperback
Jonathan and I attended a writer's workshop with Eugene Peterson two summers ago at Collegeville Institute. Around the table, we prayed and struggled as pastors and writers about the prayer to stay and all the urges to flee. I am so glad to see the culmination of those conversations in this book of wisdom. For anyone wrestling with place and purpose, this book serves as good counsel.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Jamye E. Wilson on May 5, 2010
Format: Paperback
from the book: "This is a hard word for disciples who are eager to follow Jesus anywhere, so long as we don't have to stay put"

AIDS in Africa? Let's go there! Help the Homeless? Great, let's do it! Be a foster parent? Break out the diapers!

As a self-proclaimed nomad and someone who is always looking at the NEXT thing and who wants to do EVERYthing, this book was disturbing, challenging, and just what I needed.

Jonathan Wilson-Hartgrove has done it again, putting his finger on an area that most of us need to consider, but are far too busy to notice.

Wilson-Hartgrove draws on the rich and lengthy history of the lessons of monastic ancestors and previous monastic movements to examine and explore how these seemingly distant and isolated people can speak into our modern lives. He shows how we are not so very far removed from the Desert mothers and fathers in the issues they grappled with both externally and internally.

What have we lost that they discovered?
How can we regain what has been lost?
How can we apply it to the time and place and culture in which we find ourselves?

The many urgent issues of today DO need addressing (Aids, homelessness, foster children) but do we render ourselves less effective or even ineffective by always looking to the OTHER thing or wanting to go to the OTHER place? Do we live life with the roots of daisies (which withers in a day and is thrown into the fire tomorrow) when we need to be more like an oak?

This is the book for those of us who are willing to be anywhere but HERE.
It says that before we go OUT we need to go DEEP.
It teaches us that instead of seeking Christ's PURPOSE for our lives. We need to seek CHRIST who has a purpose for our lives.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 22, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
At long last the instability that saturates our society and faith communities is addressed. We don't like the pastor - change churches. We don't like what our denomination stands for, move to another one. Don't like our spouse - find a different person. The author's wisdom is far beyond his years and as a monastic, I am encouraged by the message he has sent us in this fine book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search