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The Man With The Golden Gun (Special Edition)

3.9 out of 5 stars 313 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

The British superspy with a license to kill takes on his dark underworld double, a classy assassin who kills with golden bullets at $1 million a hit. Roger Moore, in his second outing as James Bond, meets Christopher Lee's Scaramanga, one of the most magn

Special Features

  • Inside The Man With The Golden Gun Documentary
  • Double-0 Stuntmen Documentary
  • Exciting Still Gallery
  • Original TV Ads & Radio Spots
  • Collectible Making-Of Booklet

Product Details

  • Actors: Roger Moore, Christopher Lee, Britt Ekland, Maud Adams, Hervé Villechaize
  • Directors: Guy Hamilton
  • Writers: Ian Fleming, Richard Maibaum, Tom Mankiewicz
  • Producers: Albert R. Broccoli, Charles Orme, Harry Saltzman
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.66:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: MGM (Video & DVD)
  • DVD Release Date: October 22, 2002
  • Run Time: 125 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (313 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00004RG63
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #25,344 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Man With The Golden Gun (Special Edition)" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By A Customer on May 26, 2001
Format: DVD
I know this one doesn't usually appear near the top of many critics' Best Bond Movie lists, but it's near the top of mine. Roger Moore was really in his prime in this one, and this was one of his tougher, more physical Bond performances. Moore has always been suave, and he posesses perhaps the best comic timing and delivery of any of the Bond actors, and he uses that well in Golden Gun. Also, in regards to the melody of the title song, and it's use throughout the movie, this is, IMO, the most effective scoring in the whole Bond series. There are great, exotic locales, exciting stunt sequences, and definitely one of the strongest villains in the whole series. I thought Lee's character of Scaramanga was perhaps a bit more realistic than many Bond villains, as he was more of an intelligent, psychotic loner rather than some megalomaniac set on world domination As a fan of the series, I also appreciated the Bond vs. Scaramanga final showdown as a nice change of pace from the common large scale "good commandos" vs. "evil army" battle that's used in a lot of Bond films. I also find the J.W. Pepper character to be one of the funniest in the series, so his appearance was a plus for me--this Bond movie had just enough humor to enhance the action and make it fun, without it going overboard and getting too cheesy, as they did with some of the later Moore movies. I just found this movie to be incredibly entertaining, and it just had that great Bond "feel" to it. Great picture and sound on the DVD, and a really cool documentary on the stuntmen and stunts from the whole series.
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Format: DVD
When I first saw "The Man with the Golden Gun" on its release I had mixed reactions about it. "Live and Let Die" had been such a departure from the James Bond we had been used to seeing, it was good to see some of the old elements return to this film.
The character of James Bond had been revamped in "Live and Let Die" in an attempt, I suppose, to dissociate Roger Moore's interpretation of Bond from that of Sean Connery's. In "Live and Let Die" gone were the "Martinis shaken not stirred," the Dom Perigone, Bond's virility, worldliness and sardonic wit. Even his wardrobe was over-the-top.
In "Live and Let Die" gone also was John Barry's score, Desmond Lewelin as Q, M's briefing at "Universal Exports" headquarters, the gambling casinos, engagingly futuristic and lavish sets, the sensuous and worldly bevy of Bond women.
"The Man with the Golden Gun" opens with Maurice Binder's gun barrel trademark, accompanied with the "James Bond Theme" this time played on strings, instead of guitar. That was a real innovation by John Barry, which he continued to use for Roger Moore. It was clearly evident Barry was back.
The first camera shot is of a surrealistically exotic locale on a beach where a beautiful girl towels down a tall ark man emerging from the water. The man is Scaramanga, the Man with the Golden Gun. John Barry's familiar background music accentuates the Epicurean surroundings and the film immediately looks like it has returned to more familiar Bondian territory.
As the film unfolded many of the aforementioned elements missing from "Live and Let Die" returned. There also seemed to be a more substantial plot as it initially unfolded. However, there were still undesirable elements that crept into the film as it progressed.
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Format: DVD
`The Man with the Golden Gun' is an interesting Bond film that stands out from the rest although not necessarily for good reasons. There is a definite cheapness to the film that becomes apparent right from the opening scene which features a gun battle between Scaramanga and an unremarkable thug. The gunfight is held in Scaramanga's funhouse which looks like the set of a 1960's freak out movie. At one point the gangster is startled by a quintuplet of mechanical wax manikins dressed like prohibition era gangsters including Al Capone. The problem is that when the manikins' fire blanks at the thug Capone CLEARLY blinks... TWICE. Rather than pony up for actual wax manikins or re-shoot the scene they kept it as is. Near the end of the battle Christopher Lee's Scaramanga does some kind of sliding move down an incline in order to quickly retrieve his Golden Gun. The stunt looks ridiculous and that's the problem with the film, lots of parts look cheap and silly. Even the title song seems goofy. The song is sung by `Lulu' and features double entendres like `HE has a powerful weapon' and `he COMES just before the kill'. The pinnacle of silliness has to be the corkscrew jump half way through the film. It's one of the most amazing stunts in film history and the first one ever calculated on a computer. Unfortunately it's ruined by the playing of a cartoon slide whistle as the car soars and spins.

Want to know how cheap the film is? Bond's car is an orange AMC Hornet Hatchback.

Somehow, miraculously Roger Moore and Christopher Lee manage to retain their dignity throughout all the silliness. Christopher Lee's Scaramanga is nothing like the book version but in this case the movie vastly improves on the original character.
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