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The Wizard of Oz: Celebrating the Hundredth Anniversary Hardcover – Deluxe Edition, June 15, 2000


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Hardcover, Deluxe Edition, June 15, 2000
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 - 12 years
  • Grade Level: 2 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 1000L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co. (BYR); 1st edition (June 15, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0805064303
  • ISBN-13: 978-0805064308
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 8 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (70 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,227,025 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

For many of us, the adventures of Dorothy in Oz will forever be associated not with Judy Garland singing "Somewhere Over the Rainbow" but with W. W. Denslow's exceedingly odd line drawings for the original editions of Baum's Oz series. The Viennese artist Lisbeth Zwerger, however, goes a long way toward providing a new and refreshed set of images for the Tin Man, the Cowardly Lion, and the humbug wizard. These illustrations are often cockeyed, with occasional realistic details thrown in, like a crow with a corncob in its beak in the first portrait of the Scarecrow. The characters have a poignance and oddity that escaped the makers of the Oz movie. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Publishers Weekly

Viennese illustrator and Hans Christian Andersen Medalist Lisbeth Zwerger takes a fresh look at L. Frank Baum's The Wizard of Oz in a large-format edition. Zwerger's fantastical, delicate, eccentric illustrations bear no resemblance to the vision of the movie; they make the classic tale new again. And readers can view the Emerald City through a pair of green-tinted glasses, provided in the back of the book.
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
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Loved it all together, and it's a very big book that looks just great in my collection.
Olivia M. Trevino
This edition is the entire MGM script (including the lyrics to the songs) of the 1939 movie and is is wonderfully illustrated with stills from the movie.
Joyce Benton
Even though there were so many differences in the book, I personally liked the book a lot better than the movie.
Damon163

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 13, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Here's a trivia question for you. When Dorothy killed the Wicked Witch of the East by dropping her house on the witch, was the witch wearing (a) ruby slippers? (b) silver shoes? (c) both?

If you answered "both," you have the correct answer. L. Frank Baum's original story (found in this book) has magical silver shoes in it. The movie version of the story, starring Judy Garland as Dorothy, had ruby slippers. Why the change? Well, ruby slippers film much better. So the Wicked Witch of the West wore both types of footwear, depending on whether you are reading the book or watching the movie.

I share that example with you because 9 people out of 10 have seen the movie, but never read the book. When I was a wee lad, I started in the opposite direction and was sorry to see how much of the Oz story was left out in the movie.

Now, you can make up for lost time by reading or rereading the original. I commend it to you for three primary reasons. First, the book version is built around the idea that the different parts of Oz cannot be easily traversed and the ensuing travel complications make for a better plot. Second, there are many more types of imaginative creatures in the book than in the movie. Third, the book has been lovingly enhanced by new illustrations done in turn of the 20th century style by Michael Hague. The illustrations encompass styles from immediately post van Gogh (yes, there are sunflowers) through Art Deco. I especially liked the water colors of gloomy and darkening skies.

If you are like me, you will chortle when you read L. Frank Baum's comment in the beginning that the story was "written solely to please children . . . a modernized fairy tale, in which the wonderment and joy are retained . . .
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Craig Case on October 5, 2008
Format: Hardcover
The problem with illustrating a classic with an expired copyright is that the book can get lost in the shuffle, especially if it's The Wizard of Oz or Alice in Wonderland. Every time a new edition of The Wizard comes out, there's about a 75% chance that I'll pass on it. Every time I do buy one I think, well, this will probably be the end of it. And then a new edition comes out--like this one. All one has to do is look at the cover to see that the reader is in for a fiendish ride indeed. Dorothy's a pretty little doll and Toto rides around on his little cart and doesn't move a muscle. The flowers and plant life look like things that would grow in Pepperland. The Scarecrow's face is drawn on with a red magic marker; the Tin Man looks like he was assembled from odds and ends one would find under the sink. The Lion doesn't look well at all and the Winged Monkeys look like bombers. The picture of the Wizard on page 204 resembles Donald Rumsfeld (but I suspect that's a coincidence; this book is hardly political.)
Well, I think you get the idea. This edition reminds me of those cute little furry yellow chick books by Sloane Tanen who are so full of angst.
A cautionary reminder--this book is the original text by L. Frank Baum. If you've only seen the movie, then some of these pictures may not make sense. Now for the teasers--both Glinda and the beautiful lady whom the Scarecrow sees as Oz during his private audience have the faces of two very famous ladies. See if you can figure out who they are.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 17, 2000
Format: Hardcover
The imagery of the century-old text is superb, and Michael Hague does it a great service. I've been reading this edition to my five year-old son over the past several nights, and he lingers over each lovingly detailed illustration. I'm surprised The Wizard of Oz doesn't have more high-quality editions in print. This volume is a wonderful item to add to your child's library, or even to libraries of adults who enjoy children's books. Highly recommended.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Sam A. Milazzo on June 7, 2005
Format: Hardcover
The FULL ORIGINAL Story with NEW PICTURES in less than 100 pages!
I've looked through this book myself and I quite enjoyed the pictures, as this book makes a change from the previous traditional-drawn editions. Dorothy's hair is short, the Scarecrow is fat, Glinda looks french (in fact all the pictures give a bit of a French/European feeling when you look at them) and a few other changes, both a bit funny and interesting. An earlier reviewer said that the Good Witch of the North was difficicult to make out - I disagree. Many of the pictures have a bit of symbolism - e.g. on the page where the Wicked Witch of the West sends her wolves, she (specifically, her figure) is drawn as if it's/she's the ground and if you think about it, it's like Lisbeth is showing that the Witch says "You are MY domain of the West. I control what happens here!" Dorothy holds a GIANT Silver Shoe is she tries one on, and on page 45, when the green man mentions the many 'disguises' the Wizard can take form of (elephant, brownie, cat, fairy, 'any other form', etc.) she actually DOES draw those images. Just like John R. Neil, Lisbeth gives clothes to some of the Oz Animals to wear (the mouse Queen wears a polka-dot dress/suit and a ring on her tail!) The Kalidahs may scare very little kids, with their giant bodies, long tongues, long sharp teeth and claws. The Poppy Field brings to mind the giant poppy costumes from the 1902 Musical, (which is on the back cover of "Oz: Before the Rainbow"). Of course, it would have been nice if Lisbeth drew Dorothy looking around at the country of Oz (maybe showing the Witch's feet under the house) instead of the same old Munchkin-and-Witch-greeting. My favourite picture is with Dorothy and Toto flying back to Kansas.
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