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1,058 of 1,126 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An OZ-some DVD Experience
Like most baby boomers, I've watched this film dozens of times in the past on broadcast TV, then VHS tape, then LaserDisc ... but I had never actually SEEN "The Wizard of Oz" until this newly restored DVD came out. It's an amazing transfer. The sepia-tone Kansas sequences are startlingly sharp and clear, and the Technicolored world "Over the Rainbow"...
Published on December 12, 1999 by J. Michael Click

versus
82 of 93 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars BOXSET EXTRAS ANNOUNCED
There's going to be three editions, a 2-disc DVD, a 4-disc DVD Collector's Edition, and the Blu-Ray Edition.

Disc 1 of the DVD contains everything the 2005 contained, plus a sing along feature (which, IMO, will probably be pretty useless, seeing as you could probably get the same thing by watching the movie with subtitles).
(The following is what was on...
Published on June 10, 2009 by M. Miller


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1,058 of 1,126 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An OZ-some DVD Experience, December 12, 1999
By 
J. Michael Click (Pineville, Missouri, USA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: The Wizard of Oz (DVD)
Like most baby boomers, I've watched this film dozens of times in the past on broadcast TV, then VHS tape, then LaserDisc ... but I had never actually SEEN "The Wizard of Oz" until this newly restored DVD came out. It's an amazing transfer. The sepia-tone Kansas sequences are startlingly sharp and clear, and the Technicolored world "Over the Rainbow" is truly dazzling. I found myself fascinated by details I had never noticed before: the glittering corn stalks in the Scarecrow's field; the mirror-like floors of the Emerald City; the polished buttons on the guardsmen's uniforms. Incredibly, even the individual grains of red sand in the Witch's hourglass stood out and glistened! All these minor-but-sumptuous visual details served to heighten the magical spell that the film has always woven, enhancing the performances, the story, and the music.
The DVD extras are a mind-boggling embarrassment of riches. The "Making Of" documentary hosted by the incomparable Angela Lansbury is worth the price of the DVD alone, but there's so much more: an international poster gallery, interviews with cast members, deleted scenes, production stills, radio clips, etc, etc. There's enough material to keep even the most casual viewer fascinated for hours, and a true Oz buff will be occupied for days!
If you only bought a DVD player to watch this one disc, it would well be worth the expense. Treat yourself, and fall in love with this classic film again ... for the first time.
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852 of 927 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars (Blu-ray update) Not a restoration, but an entirely different view of the film., October 30, 2005
I was just critized for foisting off the following review of the 3-disk DVD set as a review of the new Blu-ray. I didn't; Amazon did. As anyone who's been here for a while will notice, Amazon throws all DVD reviews into the same bucket, regardless of the edition. So don't blame me.

I just got the Blu-ray, and will have some comments on it at the end.

There's no need to discuss "The Wizard of Oz" itself, a classic among classics (though I'll have something to say about its "philosophy" later on). You probably want to know whether the UltraResolution transfer justifies the purchase.

It does. Oh, yes it does.

"The Wizard of Oz" has always looked good, one of the better Technicolor films. Unlike "Gone With the Wind", which was generally dark and desaturated, and which UltraResolution greatly improved, I didn't expect much enhancement for "Oz".

Was I ever wrong. I stared with my jaw hanging open. "Oz" is the best UltraResolution transfer by far -- and the others were not exactly chopped liver.

The improvement in detail and sharpness is startling, especially as the original prints did not seem obviously lacking in either. Even more amazing is the expansion of the tonal scale. Dark scenes (particularly those in the forest and outside the "witches" castle) are now filled with rich detail. Have you ever noticed how beautiful the Winkies' red, white, and gray uniforms are? I hadn't -- until now.

These enhancements combine produce the biggest improvement of all -- a major revelation of _texture_. The "feltiness" of many costumes is obvious. The burlap of the Scarecrow's face is now plainly visible, particularly in the close-up where he misstates the Pythagorean Theorem. And the Lion's costume is a thick pile of fur you want to reach out and stroke. You can see every last strand of hair.

I'm exaggerating only slightly when I say the improvements of this UltraResolution transfer are not much less than those from cleaning the Sistine Chapel's frescos. It's as if layers of murk and grime -- that you never even knew were there! -- have been stripped away. Until you view it, you cannot imagine what this film (that is, the original camera negatives) _really_ looks like. It's a shame the people who created "Oz" never got to see it this way.

The image quality is so high that I often felt as if I were looking through a window at live performers. (Well, almost.) No matter what versions you already have, you won't be disappointed with this one. I watched it twice in two days, and I might even view it a third time tonight.

My only quibble is that several matte paintings do not blend properly, because the hues at the join lines do not match those of the scene. This could have been fixed; I suspect it seemed too much work for a small improvement. (A friend suggested that these sorts of things are left in because videophiles enjoy finding them.)

As to the differences between the two- and three-disk sets... The latter includes a packet of original programs and promotional material of the sort we haven't seen in 40 years ago. (Remember the 50-cent deluxe programs for road-show films?) There's also a set of 10 reproductions of Kodachrome publicity photographs. For this viewer, these extras alone justify the higher price.

The third disk will be of most interest to lovers of all things Oz. It includes a handsomely produced biography of L. Frank Baum (interesting enough that you might want to watch it more than once), plus all the silent Oz films and a Technicolor Oz cartoon. The existence of these is well-known to anyone familiar with the history of Oz productions, but they've never appeared (as far as I know) in any home-video format.

The films are problematic. The two from Baum's production company are the best -- they have style, charm, and imagination. The others are cheesy ripoffs that bear little relation to the original book. The Larry Semon -- a once wildly-popular but now virtually forgotten cartoonist and comic * -- version is especially obnoxious, as it is little more than a vehicle for Semon's brand of physical comedy. The Baum estate is at least partly to blame -- _any_ movie version must have seemed more attractive than none, especially as the technology to make a convincing version of "Oz" would not exist for another 15 years.

The film's opening titles praise the book's "kindly philosophy", which seems to be either "You already have everything you need to be happy", or "The answer to your problems lies within yourself". These are not so much "kindly" as reflections of the hard-nosed "All your problems are your own fault" and "If you're not a success, it's because you're lazy" homilies that grew out of the great opportunity for personal development and material success this country offered.

I believe L. Frank Baum had something a bit different in mind. "The Wizard of Oz" is a fairy tale in which magic has no bearing on the issues at the center of the story. I believe Baum wanted to discourage children from fantasizing that magic could be a solution to one's problems.

So... he has the four principals make a grueling journey to the Emerald City, then find the wizard is a humbug. (What a shame the blander "fake", "fraud", or "phony" have replaced that delightful word.) He posesses no magic to supply wit, love, or grit, which the Scarecrow, Tin Woodman, and Cowardly Lion have demonstrated they already have.

Baum's "moral" is simple -- Love, wisdom, and courage are what we need to get through life. No one can _give_ them to us, because we _already_ possess them, and all we need to do is express them.

"Is that right?"

"That's all it is."

Now... the question you've been waiting for the answer to... Is the Blu-ray set worth the price?

I viewed the Blu-ray on a Pioneer 60" Pro Kuro, fed from a Sony BDP-S550. I also watched the DVD on the Pioneer (fed from the same Blu-ray player), and on a 36" Sony 400-series WEGA "improved definition" TV (fed from a Sony DVP-S7000).

The DVD remains a terrific DVD, and looks terrific on a high-quality 480i monitor. (See the preceding review.) It was, and still is, a demo-quality DVD.

When played on the BD player, and upconverted to 1080p, the DVD's image on the Kuro is pretty darn good -- the sharpness and detail are at least "acceptable". But when you play the Blu-ray disk, the image goes from "acceptable" to almost-startling. Two examples... Note the enhanced detail and texture in the weather-beaten wood above the WWE's lifeless legs. And in the crowd scenes, you can see (just about) every Munchkin face. There is virtually no smearing of detail.

So... should you rush right out in a buying frenzy and get the BD edition? It depends.

The DVD is good enough for an excellent picture on a high-quality SD monitor. But even upconverted, it isn't good enough for a _large_ HD display. If you have, say, a 40" display; your BD player has a good upconverter (not all do); and you don't sit "on top of" the screen (as I do); you might see little difference between the DVD and the Blu-ray.

But if you're a video fuss-budget (as I am) and sit closer than the "experts" recommend (why _shouldn't_ you?), you will almost certainly prefer the Blu-ray. It's your call.

A few remarks on the extras... The wristwatch, as the kid in the Ally bank commercial says, is a piece of junk. The design shows no particular style, wit, or imagination. And as others have said, "The Dreamer of OZ" is a wretched transfer, very badly unpconverted to 1080. It is not of acceptable quality, and should have been put on the DVD disk.

I will come back later (I hope) with some more comments on the sound and the other extras. Forcing yourself to repeatedly watch large chunks of a movie, regardless of its quality, is an ennervating experience.
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388 of 433 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 2009 two, four and blu-ray version contents:, August 5, 2009
Completely irritated by the lack of info I raked up my own for your pleasure:

THE WIZARD OF OZ 70th Anniversary Ultimate Collector's Edition (4-Disc DVD Set or 2-Disc Blu-ray Set)

Also available in 2-Disc DVD Special Edition
(or 1-Disc Blu-ray)(CONTENTS BELOW)

Warner Home Video celebrates the beloved classic with spectacular new DVD or Blu-ray version, September 29, featuring 16 hours of enhanced content (four of which are brand new) -- includes New Documentaries, Featurettes, a Sing-Along Track and Extraordinary Collectibles!

Burbank, CA -- It is difficult to imagine a motion picture more magical and more wonderful than Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer's beloved and classic 1939 musical, The Wizard of Oz. Over the last seven decades, the film has indelibly woven itself into America's cultural consciousness: Is there anyone who doesn't immediately think of the film upon hearing the words, "Dorothy," "Toto," "Emerald City," "Ruby Slippers" and "Yellow Brick Road" -- or the lines to the song "Over the Rainbow?"

Now, the colorful characters and unforgettable songs of Oz come alive as never before when Warner Home Video brings this cinematic treasure into the digital age with the September 29 Blu-ray release of The Wizard of Oz 70th Anniversary Ultimate Collector's Edition. The commemorative edition contains nearly 4 hours of all-new and never-before-available bonus features and is housed in numbered collectible packaging, and will be available for a limited time only for $69.92 SRP (DVD) and $84.99 SRP (Blu-ray Hi-Def).

In order to bring all the visual splendor of The Wizard of Oz to the Hi-Def world of Blu-ray Disc, the film has been entirely remastered, with each of the original Technicolor camera negatives scanned using 8K resolution. From this scan, a final "capture" master was created in 4K, yielding twice the resolution seen in the master utilized for the film's previous DVD release.

Working in "full film Resolution", extreme care was taken to ensure that all of the image fidelity contained in the original negatives was properly captured for this new presentation. The sounds of Oz will come alive on Blu-ray disc utilizing the full audio spectrum capabilities available through Dolby TrueHD audio. The net result is one of unprecedented quality that is sure to make The Wizard of Oz 70th Anniversary Edition a benchmark in the history of the Blu-ray format.

There will also be a dedicated official site for all Oz-related events and products: [...]

The following components are ALL-NEW and exclusive to the Ultimate Collector's Edition:

The Dreamer of Oz -- which makes its long-awaited home video debut. Also remastered the occasion, this full-length motion picture was an NBC-TV special event in 1990 and thrilled critics and audiences as it told the back story of author L. Frank Baum, "the Royal Historian of Oz." John Ritter shines in the title role -- the man who defied all odds to create the famous characters and stories. Annette O'Toole beautifully co-stars as his supportive wife, with Rue McClanahan as his challenging witch of a mother-in-law.

Victor Fleming, Master Craftsman -- a new feature-length documentary produced specifically for this release about the Hollywood director who, in the same year, miraculously brought both Oz and Gone With the Wind to the screen.

Hollywood Celebrates It's Biggest Little Stars -- a new featurette stars seven of the original "Munchkins of Oz" and tells the saga of the long journey, culminating in them receiving their own 2007 Star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

The Magic Cloak of Oz -- the first release of the complete 1914 silent film, including lost footage never before included in a home video presentation of this feature (produced by Baum himself).

The Patchwork Girl of Oz -- another 1914 Baum-produced, feature-length silent film, new to Warner Home Video.

The Wizard of Oz Sing-Along Track -- here making its home entertainment debut.

Reproductions of Archival Material -- Extraordinary renderings of the original 1939 Oz campaign, exploitation, and press books. These materials constitute a Hollywood "holy grail" for Oz, Garland, and motion picture fans alike and, for decades, have been among the most sought-after and impossible-to-find collectibles.

Behind The Curtain -- a 52-page miniature coffee-table book, assembled by pre-eminent Oz historian John Fricke. Encompassing much previously unpublished material, the deluxe volume includes behind-the-scenes Oz photographs, studio memos, and script pages for abandoned scenes and musical numbers.

Exclusive Wizard of Oz Watch -- A collectible and numbered 70th Anniversary watch, incorporating art from the film and enhanced with genuine crystals. Available nowhere else, this beautiful timepiece was created specially for this DVD edition.

DIGITAL COPY (on the disc)

And for the Blu-Ray Ultimate Collector's Edition, the original extended version of "If I Only Had a Brain" performed by Ray Bolger has been remastered in hi-definition especially for this release.

*********************************

4-Disc DVD Ultimate Collector's Edition:
Includes 16 hours of enhanced content (4 of which are brand NEW)
Disc One:
* Remastered feature with Dolby Digital 5.1 Audio (NEW)
* Sing-along Track (NEW)
* Commentary by John Fricke with Barbara Freed-Saltzman (daughter of Arthur Freed), Margaret Hamilton, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, John Lahr (son of Bert Lahr), Jane Lahr (daughter of Bert Lahr), Hamilton Meserve (son of Margaret Hamilton), Dona Massin (MGM choreographer), William Tuttle (make-up artist), Buddy Ebsen, Mervyn LeRoy, and Jerry Maren
* The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Storybook
* Prettier Than Ever: The Restoration of Oz
* We Haven't Really Met Properly
* Music and Effects Track
* Original Mono Track
Disc Two:
* The Wonderful Wizard of Oz: The Making of a Movie Classic [1990 TV special]
* Memories of Oz [2001 TCM documentary]
* The Art of Imagination: A Tribute to Oz
* Because of the Wonderful Things it Does: The Legacy of Oz
* Harold Arlen's Home Movies
* Outtakes and Deleted Scenes
* It's a Twister! It's a Twister! The Tornado Tests
* Off to See the Wizard
* 3 Vault Shorts
* Audio Jukebox Selection
* Leo Is on the Air Radio Promo
* Good News of 1939 Radio Show
* 12/25/1950 Lux Radio Theater Broadcast
* Still Galleries
* Six Theatrical Trailers
Disc 3 & 4 are Exclusive to this edition
Disc Three:
* Victor Fleming: Master Craftsman (NEW)
* L. Frank Baum: The Man Behind the Curtain
Celebrating Hollywood's Biggest Little Stars (NEW)
* The Dreamer of Oz [1990 TV special] (NEW)
* The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1910)
* The Wizard of Oz [1933]
Disc Four:
* His Majesty, The Scarecrow of Oz
* The Magic Cloak of Oz [1914] (NEW)
* The Patchwork Girl of Oz [1914] (NEW)
* The Wizard of Oz [1925 feature]
* Collectible and numbered 70th Anniversary Wizard of Oz watch with genuine crystals
* Replica of the original film budget
* "Behind the Curtain" (a 52-page, coffee-table book)
* Reproduction of the original 1939 campaign book
* Bonus DIGITAL COPY (on the disc)

***********************************
Here's is what the TWO DISC 2009 dvd contains:

Available in 2-Disc DVD Special Edition (SRP $24.98) or 1-Disc Blu-ray, both of which include the following:
* Remastered feature with Dolby Digital 5.1 Audio [DVD] or Dolby TrueHD 5.1 Audio [Blu-ray] (NEW)
* Sing-along Track (NEW)
* Commentary by John Fricke with Barbara Freed-Saltzman (daughter of Arthur Freed), Margaret Hamilton, Ray Bolger, Jack Haley, John Lahr (son of Bert Lahr), Jane Lahr (daughter of Bert Lahr), Hamilton Meserve (son of Margaret Hamilton), Dona Massin (MGM choreographer), William Tuttle (make-up artist), Buddy Ebsen, Mervyn LeRoy, and Jerry Maren
* The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Storybook
* Prettier Than Ever: The Restoration of Oz
* We Haven't Really Met Properly
* Music and Effects Track
* Original Mono Track
Disc Two:
* The Wonderful Wizard of Oz: The Making of a Movie Classic [1990 TV special]
* Memories of Oz [2001 TCM documentary]
* The Art of Imagination: A Tribute to Oz
* Because of the Wonderful Things it Does: The Legacy of Oz
* Harold Arlen's Home Movies
* Outtakes and Deleted Scenes
* It's a Twister! It's a Twister! The Tornado Tests
* Off to See the Wizard
* 3 Vault Shorts
* Audio Jukebox Selection
* Leo Is on the Air Radio Promo
* Good News of 1939 Radio Show
* 12/25/1950 Lux Radio Theater Broadcast
* Still Galleries
* Six Theatrical Trailers
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125 of 141 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Why it's not in Widescreen..., November 2, 2005
By 
Tober Mike (Portland, Oregon) - See all my reviews
I've read a few negative reviews here complaining about this release because it's not in the widescreen format and wanted to explain why. This movie was originally released in 1939. Movies weren't shot in the widescreen format until the 1950s. Widescreen was a format used by Hollywood to combat a new form of entertainment that they feared would put them out of business...television. This is why television originally had the aspect ratio of 4:3, because it matched the aspect ratio of movies at the time. There was a "fake" widescreen version of the Wizard of Oz released in 1955, but it wasn't true widescreen, how could it be since the master prints are in the 4:3 aspect ratio? MGM simply cut the top and bottom of the picture to fit a widescreen format. Fortunately, this version hasn't seen the light of day since it's release in 1955.

Just wanted to clear that up for people wondering why there's no widescreen format.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Quite possibly the best DVD ever released., January 30, 2006
Over the last few years, Warner Bros. has raised the bar for DVD treatments of classic films from their studio as well as MGM and RKO films owned by Turner Entertainment. In 2004, Warner Bros. released a 4-Disc Collector's Edition of Gone With The Wind, raising the bar even for themselves, as well as other studios. While some studios have failed to meet the high standards, Warner Bros. outdid themselves in 2005 with their two DVD reissues of The Wizard of Oz. When they announced the release of the 3-disc DVD, I became so excited for this DVD release. This movie makes me SO happy, and I thought it was time that it got a set like this.

If you don't want to spend all this money for this deluxe box set, the 2-Disc Special Edition is also a wonderful option. Although you lose the third disc, which we'll discuss in just a minute, and the wonderful print extras, if those don't matter much to you, it won't matter. All of the other wonderful bonuses from discs 1 and 2 are still there as well as the new pristine restoration.

However, I would now like to discuss the content of this beautiful 3-disc set.

Packaged in a gorgeous digipack with a slipcase holding the digipack and the two folders of print extras, you already know just by looking at the package that this will be a wonderful set.

Disc 1 contains the set's centerpiece - the movie, newly restored to pristine clear perfection in Warner Bros. revolutionary Ultra Resolution process. First, all color records are scanned at a high resolution and perfectly aligned for the clearest image ever. Then, one frame at a time, dirt, scratches, film tears, etc. are removed. Finally, color correction is done to make sure the colors pop out at you, but aren't overly saturated. The result is the best video edition EVER of Oz. Details are brought out like never before. Also included are featurettes on the cast, restoration, as well as a wonderful audio commentary. Unlike the boring commentary on GWTW, Oz's commentary is exciting and informative.

Disc 2 contains the main bonus features, most of which are ported over from Warner's 1999 single-disc DVD, and this is the disc that delves into the making of the movie. The main bonus feature is the 1990 making-of documentary "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz" which really goes in depth into the making of the movie. Most Oz fans have seen this already, so I need not talk about it in detail. Also from the 1999 DVD are the trailers, stills galleries, audio vault, (Although a new addition is in the audio vault - the Christmas Day 1950 Lux Radio Theater Broadcast, with Judy Garland as Dorothy.) short films from the vault, special effects tests, Harold Arlen's home movies, and outtakes. Three new featurettes are included - a TCM documentary featuring filmmakers, surviving cast members, and many others, titled "Memories Of Oz," where these people reminisce about making the movie, their feelings about the movie, etc. The second featurette is called "The Art Of Imagination." More filmmakers talk about the technical aspects of the making of the film and how it influenced the way they make movies. Finally, "Because Of The Wonderful Things It Does," narrated by Brittany Murphy and featuring interviews with authors, filmmakers, and others, discusses how The Wizard of Oz has made an impact on our culture. These new featurettes are a WONDERFUL new way to delve into the world of Oz.

Exclusive to this set, the third disc salutes L. Frank Baum, the man who penned the original 14 Oz books. A new documentary, "The Man Behind The Curtain," discusses his life. Then, we are treated to 4 full-length silent film versions and one 1933 musical color cartoon version of Oz. The silent films are in fairly good condition, with the 1925 version featuring Oliver Hardy given a good cleanup, color tinting, and a new score. It is also possible that this was the inspiration for the farm hands becoming Dorothy's Oz friends in thr 1939 movie. The cartoon has seen better days, but it shows where the inspiration for filming Kansas in black-and-white and Oz in color may have come from, and all in all, it's a cute cartoon.

The bonus material doesn't stop with the DVDs. Also inclued are two folders of print extras. One contains ten beautiful glossy reproduction of Kodachrome publicity portraits and on-set photos. And the other contains a glossy page with posters, premiere invitation and ticket reproductions, the premiere program, MGM Studio News, and Photoplay Studies. These gorgeous reproductions truly make this box set a real treat for big Oz fans.

In conclusion, if you are a fan of The Wizard Of Oz, the 2-Disc Special Edition is a wonderful DVD. If you're hardcore enough to buy this 3-Disc set, go for it! In my opinion, this is the best DVD ever made, and Warner Bros. has set a new high standard for themselves and other studios for DVD releases. Now, if the studios can meet these standards is another story.
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars We're not in 480p anymore, Toto, February 11, 2010
It's remarkable to think this movie was made in 1939, having just watched the new Blu Ray release, because the 1080p restored transfer is simply stunning and looks as bright and as clear as if it were made only in the last decade.

As I'm sure all you fans are aware, color plays an important aspect in this film. The moment Dorothy emerges from her wind-blown sepia Kansas home into the rainbow Land of Oz takes your breath away and we've been seeing color for over 70 years. Imagine how the 1939 audience felt! If you truly want to experience this film like it was meant to be, you need to get it on Blu Ray. There's simply nothing like it. I'm in love with Blu Ray for all my movies now, but when I watch these classics digitally restored it really makes the technology shine.

How many times had I seen the Wizard of Oz before the release? It would be impossible to count, and yet, having just seen it in such clarity the entire experience was fresh and exciting. Directors and film makers go into a lot of work to make classics like this, and when color plays such a huge role, you want to see it exactly as it was intended. I am certain director Victor Fleming would have wanted us to see this version. It was how it was meant to be seen.

In conclusion of my review, I am sorry if you were interested in a plot summary or even my review of the extras. I haven't got around to the bonus features yet, but I figured most of you are more interested in the quality of the Blu Ray transfer. I have been burned by some poor Blu Rays that were not much better than the DVD, but this release of Oz was not one of them. I'd even go so far as to say it was one of the better if not best I've seen. I understand there are a couple different Blu Ray releases of this, so for the hardcore fan I'm sure the extras are worth the price. Otherwise, I would highly recommend the budget version because this is one of the most classic films in our history and it would be a shame not to experience it like no generation has ever been able to do.
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82 of 93 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars BOXSET EXTRAS ANNOUNCED, June 10, 2009
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
There's going to be three editions, a 2-disc DVD, a 4-disc DVD Collector's Edition, and the Blu-Ray Edition.

Disc 1 of the DVD contains everything the 2005 contained, plus a sing along feature (which, IMO, will probably be pretty useless, seeing as you could probably get the same thing by watching the movie with subtitles).
(The following is what was on the 2005 edition)
· Audio Commentary hosted by John Fricke with archival audio interviews
· The Wonderful Wizard of Oz Storybook
· Prettier Than Ever: The Restoration of Oz
· We Haven't Really Met Properly
· Music and Effects Track
· Original Mono Track

Disc 2 is exactly the same as Disc 2 of the 2005 edition.
· The Wonderful Wizard of Oz: The Making of a Movie Classic [1990 TV special]
· Memories of Oz [2001 TCM documentary]
· The Art of Imagination: A Tribute to Oz
· Because of the Wonderful Things it Does: The Legacy of Oz
· Harold Arlen's Home Movies
· Outtakes and Deleted Scenes
· It's a Twister! It's a Twister! The Tornado Tests
· "Off to See the Wizard" Clips
· 3 Vault Shorts
· Audio Jukebox Selection
· Leo Is on the Air Radio Promo
· Good News of 1939 Radio Show
· 12/25/1950 Lux Radio Theater Broadcast
· Still Galleries
· Six Theatrical Trailers

Discs 3 & 4 is where new content finally turns up:

Disc 3's probably most-awaited feature is:
- the 1990 movie "The Dreamer of Oz," based on the life of Oz author and creator L. Frank Baum.

-Also a new feature is "Victor Fleming: Master Craftsman," a documentary about the director whose name appears on the movie. (Albeit not the only director...)

-"Celebrating Hollywood's Biggest Little Stars," a featurette about the midgets who portrayed the Munchkins, culminating with their receiving a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

-Ported over from the 2005 DVD for this one is "L. Frank Baum: The Man Behind The Curtain," a short documentary that might get a little muddled in it's presentation, but is much more factual than "The Dreamer of Oz."

-There is also the 1910 silent movie "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz," and the 1933 cartoon "The Wizard of Oz."

Disc 4 contains the other Oz silent movies.
-It's noted that "The Magic Cloak of Oz" (1914) will contain footage that has not been available on home video.

-The disc will also contain "The Patchwork Girl of Oz" from 1914, which was not on the 2005 DVD.

-So, directly ported over from Disc 3 of the 2005 is "His Majesty, The Scarecrow of Oz" (1914),

-and the 1925 "Wizard of Oz" silent movie.

The press release says "Blu-ray Hi-Def will have Discs 1 & 2 and Discs 3 & 4 combined," so don't expect the special features to be remastered in HD.

Also, exclusive to the Blu-Ray is a documentary called "MGM: When The Lion Roars."

And yeah, a "Digital Copy" will either be on one of the DVDs or on a bonus DVD-ROM.

And like the 2005 edition, actual print material and other physical items will be with the Collector's Editions:
· Collectible and numbered 70th Anniversary Wizard of Oz watch with genuine crystals
· Replica of the original film budget
· Behind the Curtain, A 52-page, coffee-table book
· Reproduction of the original 1939 campaign book

(This doesn't sound like it's going to contain the print materials from the 2005 DVD set. Those were reproductions of the premiere program, ticket, invitation, the issue of MGM studio news that featured "The Wizard of Oz," a Photoplay Studies Guide about the movie, reproductions of publicity photographs, and postcard-sized card that showed tiny versions of publicity posters.)

The release date for the sets is listed as September 29.

So, yeah, there's a bit of an upgrade from the 2005 edition, though I suspect casual movie fans might skip the DVD, unless they want "The Dreamer of Oz" and the bonus non-DVD goodies. (Me, I'm interested in the new version of "The Magic Cloak of Oz.") Oz collectors will probably get it and also hang on to the 2005 set. (MANY Oz fans have many copies of the movie on VHS, DVD, and laserdisc.)

People who are in to Blu-Ray will be glad that the Blu-Ray didn't skip anything from the old DVDs, though I doubt the one Blu-Ray-exclusive special feature will make people want to jump over to the new format.

CREDIT: jadarchives @ imdb
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38 of 41 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What All DVD Releases Should Be Like!, August 28, 2000
By 
Joe (Upstate, NY) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Wizard of Oz (DVD)
When I saw that the Wizard of Oz was released on DVD, I grabbed it without a second thought. I've loved this movie since a child, but never owned a copy of it. I think everyone here has established that the movie is an all-time classic, so this review will focus on the DVD itself.
I think this DVD should be used as an instruction manual, or rough guide in how to make a great DVD. Studios in Hollywood, directors, and anyone else into DVD production should be forced to sit and take notes. The extras and features on this thing are amazing. You've got the wonderful movie itself, a behind-the-scenes documentary, outtakes, deleted scenes, biographies of all the stars, some great facts about the movie and the stars that will probably surprise you, studio pictures, theater trailers and stills, clips of the Wizard of Oz cartoon, many audio supplements, and a lot more! There is also a few hidden surprises on the disc, if you know where to look.... (In the 'Oz Characters' section off the special features menu, go to the first page of Glinda's info. Select the glowing orb above her wand, and find some hidden pages on the Munchkins. On the first info page for the Wicked Witch, select the hour glass for some hidden pages with info on the flying monkeys).
You can spend hours just going through the extras on this release. While so many studios are using this medium to just shovel their old releases onto and cash in, The Wizard of Oz release truly shows the power of DVD, and is what all DVD releases should be like.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Wizard of Oz is to movies as the Beatles are to music., September 26, 2013
By 
J. Brown (Manahawkin, NJ) - See all my reviews
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IMAX 3D - Not enough can be said about the presentation. From the clear sound to the freckles on Dorothy's face to the burlap stitching on the scarecrows face to the red rusted tears on the tin man when he cried to the, well the list goes on. What ever money was spent over the 16 months it took to restore and transform this film to 3-D was worth it. Like the Beatles whose music I've repeatedly bought over and over again from vinyl to 8 track to cassette to CD to Flac files on a flash drive, and will continue to buy every update available, the Wizard of Oz is that good. From Beta to VHS to Laserdisc to DVD to Blu Ray and now a 75th anniversary 3D edition, you HAVE to buy this latest version. I haven't seen it on Blu Ray, but if it's close to the experience of IMAX, then it's worth it. You don't watch this movie, you experience it. In all it's glory, this could be the very best film ever made. The sepia tone part of the film does not seem to be from elements as good as the technicolor. That part of the film is gorgeous. GORGEOUS!!!! It's simply amazing what the early technicolor looked like. The surreal make up only adds to the fantasy and the 3-D effect for the most part gives the film a depth and clarity that adds to the enjoyment. Put all of your other versions out for the yard sale or keep them as collectables. This, so far, is the definitive version. And...above all watch it. Make the evening an event. Plan a party for friends and relatives and enjoy.
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72 of 83 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars If you are new to DVDs, this should be your first purchase!, April 30, 2000
This review is from: The Wizard of Oz (DVD)
Of the DVDs I own or have rented, this one is the most impressive. The special features are numerous and incredible. Who knew that Buddy Ebsen was originally cast as the Tinman or that Ray Bolger had a wonderful dance scene that was deleted from the final cut of the movie? I especially enjoyed the interviews with the cast and the commentary on the other vintage movies that were also released in 1939 (if only we were so lucky to have as many outstanding movies to be released in one year as were released in 1939).
Besides the special features that make this DVD a must own, the sound and picture qualities are superior. Since I was old enough to remember, I watched The Wizard of Oz on TV every year. Now, I get to watch it with my daughter in all of its glory and splendor on DVD. Though the hallway to the Wizard doesn't seem nearly as long and the Wicked Witch is not quite as scary (as when I was a child), the magic of the movie remains. If you loved the movie as a child and you are looking for an exceptional quality DVD that your family will enjoy for years and years, you must buy this DVD! Recapture the magic of the first time you saw The Wizard of Oz by watching it on DVD.
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The Wizard of Oz: 75th Anniversary Edition
The Wizard of Oz: 75th Anniversary Edition by Victor Fleming (DVD - 2013)
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