The Wolf's Tooth and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$22.16
Qty:1
  • List Price: $25.00
  • Save: $2.84 (11%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Wolf's Tooth: Keyston... has been added to your Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $6.19
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Wolf's Tooth: Keystone Predators, Trophic Cascades, and Biodiversity Paperback – January 1, 2011

ISBN-13: 978-1597263986 ISBN-10: 1597263982 Edition: 2nd

Buy New
Price: $22.16
18 New from $20.64 12 Used from $21.48
Rent from Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$22.16
$20.64 $21.48
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


Frequently Bought Together

The Wolf's Tooth: Keystone Predators, Trophic Cascades, and Biodiversity + The Carnivore Way: Coexisting with and Conserving North America's Predators
Price for both: $44.87

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Island Press; 2 edition (January 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1597263982
  • ISBN-13: 978-1597263986
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #378,958 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

What do wolves have to do with the viability of trees? Or sea otters with kelp? Conservation biologist Eisenberg explains the far-reaching impact of such keystone species on their habitats in her debut book, which is rooted in the seminal work of Aldo Leopold, who traced the energy flow of the food chain, and the much debated “green world hypothesis,” which states that the world is green because predators keep herbivores in check. Eisenberg shares eye-opening revelations regarding the full scope and astonishing subtleties of predator/prey relationships and their immense ecological impact. Drawing on her own fieldwork with wolves, she observes that when they are eradicated, entire biotic communities are jeopardized, including aspen stands, in a process known as a trophic cascade. This waterfall or domino effect gravely diminishes terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Eisenberg cites vivid examples in Yellowstone, the Aleutian Islands, Amazon rain forests, and coral reefs that affirm the core truth about nature: it's all about relationships. An enlightening work that will advance understanding of biodiversity and how to sustain it. --Donna Seaman --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

"An enlightening work that will advance understanding of biodiversity and how to sustain it."
(Booklist)


"[S]trike[s] at the heart of what it means to be a biologist."
(The Scientist)


"A wonderful example of the inspiration that comes from the natural history set"
(BioScience)


"Fully referenced, meticulously researched and beautifully written, The Wolf's Tooth is an absorbing read for anyone interested in biodiversity, ecology, conservation or wildlife management....everyone with a serious interest in ecology, conservation, ecosystem management and/or biodiversity should read Eisenberg's book. I loved it, and developed an enhanced understanding of trophic cascades research and ecosystem change. In a world where habitats and communities are changing fast due to human action, such concepts as sequential faunal collapse and ecosystem degradation are going to become all too familiar."
(Tetrapod Zoology)


"[C]olourful...The author's writing style is readable, enjoyable and occasionally extremely lyrical...an extremely interesting and enjoyable synthesis of the science of trophic cascades."
(Oryx)


"The Wolf's Tooth is an engaging read which will be of wide interest to all ecologists, even those whose research is not focussed on predators."
(Austral Ecology)


"A fascinating book. If you want to know more about the relationship between animals and the land they live in it's a worthwhile read with the potential to open many people's hearts, minds and eyes."
(Wolf Print)


"Eisenberg is that rare writer who blends accessible descriptions of science with a lyrical sensitivity to the spiritual qualities of nature. Here, she uses these talents to present a highly readable summary of trophic cascades, the ripples felt through marine, terrestrial, and aquatic ecosystems when top predators are removed or reintroduced. The result of this blending of science and aesthetics is an engaging and even uplifting read. Highly recommended."
(CHOICE)


"This engaging book explores the reasons we need big predators and explains the most revolutionary idea found in contemporary ecology: trophic cascades. For nearly a century ecologists have believed that nature is democratic, governed from the bottom up by the amount of solar energy converted to green biomass, the food of herbivores. Eisenberg makes the case for the alternative view—top-down control of ecosystems by predators and other keystone species—while diplomatically exploring a path for reconciling these disparate views."
(Michael Soulé Professor Emeritus, University of California, Santa Cruz)


"Cristina Eisenberg weaves her observations as a scientist and her personal experiences afield into a resonant account about the web of life that links humans to the natural world. Grounded in best science, inspired by her intimate knowledge of the wolves she studies, she offers us a luminous portrait of the ecological relationships that are essential for our well-being in a rapidly changing world. The Wolf's Tooth calls for a conservation vision that involves rewilding the earth and honoring all our relations."
(Brenda Peterson author of I Want to Be Left Behind: Finding Rapture Here on Earth)


"We've been practicing 'scientific' wildlife management for decades with a shaky grasp of how natural systems actually work. As the focus shifts, at last, from favored species toward biodiversity and community ecology, exciting new concepts such as trophic cascades and the keystone roles played by long-reviled predators come to the fore. This is the next level of conservation, as complex as it is crucial. You couldn't ask for a better guide than Cristina Eisenberg, blending tales from her own field studies with wonderfully clear explanations of the connections that keep nature vibrant and whole over time."
(Douglas H. Chadwick wildlife biologist, conservation reporter, and author of The Wolverine Way)


"The Wolf's Tooth takes a venerable but misunderstood concept in ecology and renders it fresh, clear, and vital. In elegant prose drawn from her own deep experience in the field, Cristina Eisenberg has written a genuinely important contribution to the conservation biology canon. Besides showing how trophic cascades actually work, and how top predators can help rewild North America, her book is a fine primer for both theoretical and practical ecology."
(Robert Michael Pyle author of Wintergreen and Chasing Monarchs)


"A scientist with a poet's command of language, Cristina Eisenberg writes with precision and passion . . . takes her reader on a breathtaking, sometimes heartbreaking tour of the planet from the Gulf of Maine to the Amazonian rain forests, the tropical coral reefs to old growth forests of the Northwest as well as rivers, lakes, and wetlands. I found the wealth of information not only accessible but riveting . . . Eisenberg's powerful, beautifully written book . . . has the potential to open many people's eyes, minds, and hearts."
(Elizabeth Cunningham Huffington Post)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
7
4 star
2
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 10 customer reviews
This was a very interesting and exciting read.
Eileen Friedman
Cristina Eisenberg may be a conservation biologist, but in The Wolf's Tooth, she also demonstrates great teaching skills.
M. Ludwig
Lay persons and scientists alike will gain an insight into "keystone predators, tropic cascades, and biodiversity".
D. Hughes

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By T. Hogan on June 2, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The fundamental insight of ecology is that all of life is connected. Cristina Eisenberg's "The Wolf's Tooth" explores this interdependence through the lens of food webs in wild nature.

With the restoration of the gray wolf to Yellowstone National Park, the idea that ecosystems can be shaped by predators at the top of the food chain - trophic cascades - has gained increased attention from ecologists and conservationists. "The Wolf's Tooth" is a measured look at this idea of "top-down regulation," not overplaying the story, but still emphasizing its too-often-overlooked role in food web dynamics. One of the singular strengths of the book is in bringing focus to the role keystone species can play in restoring and rewilding landscapes.

Interweaving personal stories with a wealth of research, Eisenberg carefully guides the reader through the science in a manner accessible to the interested layperson. In the end, one is left with the truism that wild nature is not only more complicated than we think, it's more complicated than we can think. Getting there is a fascinating journey populated with willows, wolves, and warblers, as well as starfish and sea otters, conservationists and ranchers, and an intrepid field ecologist following the spoor of Aldo Leopold who always told his children, "it's all about relationships."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Brian Mcaveney on May 25, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I found The Wolf's Tooth very inspirational and informative. It continues to amaze me the impact one species can have on our environment. Being a landscape architect, the relationship between the animal and the land, and how keystone species can spur landscape restoration and shape landscapes really hits home with me and I find it greatly interesting. I highly recommend this book for anyone who cares for, and is passionate about, restoring our country's biodiversity and ecosystems. a great read!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Elisabeth Carey on February 16, 2011
Format: Paperback
This is a useful and interesting overview of the state of ecosystem management science, its history, complexities, and uncertainties. Eisenberg interlaces accounts of her own research on wolves, elks, aspens, and songbirds in Colorado, Wyoming, and elsewhere, with accounts of what others are doing or have done in similar settings and in very different ones. These include the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial Ranch in Montana, a working ranch that operates as a demonstration of how conservation and ranching can work in harmony, making a productive ranch in a wild landscape that includes bears, wolves, cougars, elk, mule deer, and other wildlife normal absent or barely hanging on in ranching territory.

The main point here is to explain the current state and history of ecological science. Eisenberg lays out the evidence of the importance of keystone predators, such as wolves in North America and sharks in the oceans, in maintaining a healthy level of biodiversity. One example: In the absence of wolves, elk overbrowse aspen saplings, leading to a lack of aspen in the middle age ranges, leading to a lack of the songbirds for whom a healthy density of mature and near-mature aspens are the preferred habitat. Over the last couple of decades, field research has strongly reinforced the importance of these keystone predators in maintaining the diversity that we need in order to continue to live comfortably on this planet.

But the top-down effects of keystone predators aren't the whole story. Food supply, disease, climate change, and other "bottom up" effects are also important, and interact with the top-down effects of keystone predators.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By D. Hughes on May 27, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
After admiring the dust cover, I spent the next hour or two absorbing the first few chapters. I enjoy Eisenberg's style of writing; she is easy to understand as she shares with the reader her experiences in the field. If you care about your environs and want to learn how top predators can affect an environment, this book is a must read. Lay persons and scientists alike will gain an insight into "keystone predators, tropic cascades, and biodiversity".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By M. Ludwig on June 23, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Cristina Eisenberg may be a conservation biologist, but in The Wolf's Tooth, she also demonstrates great teaching skills. She uses repetition, personal stories of her field work and includes a glossary, all to help the reader understand her views on how keystone predators can regulate ecosystems. Her style of writing is clear and direct and the passion she has for her subject shines through in every chapter. It is a well-documented book that would be a great addition to the personal or educational library of anyone interested in conservation biology. It's a book for scientist and layman alike and will help all find hope in the future.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again