The Wordy Shipmates and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.79
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Wordy Shipmates Hardcover – October 7, 2008


See all 16 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, October 7, 2008
$2.89 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Malice Toward None
Featured New Release in Historical Biographies

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Riverhead Hardcover; First Edition edition (October 7, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1594489998
  • ISBN-13: 978-1594489990
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (214 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #688,071 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Starred Review. Essayist and public radio regular Vowell (Assassination Vacation) revisits America's Puritan roots in this witty exploration of the ways in which our country's present predicaments are inextricably tied to its past. In a style less colloquial than her previous books, Vowell traces the 1630 journey of several key English colonists and members of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Foremost among these men was John Winthrop, who would become governor of Massachusetts. While the Puritans who had earlier sailed to Plymouth on the Mayflower were separatists, Winthrop's followers remained loyal to England, spurred on by Puritan Reverend John Cotton's proclamation that they were God's chosen people. Vowell underscores that the seemingly minute differences between the Plymouth Puritans and the Massachusetts Puritans were as meaningful as the current Sunni/Shia Muslim rift. Gracefully interspersing her history lesson with personal anecdotes, Vowell offers reflections that are both amusing (colonial history lesson via The Brady Bunch) and tender (watching New Yorkers patiently waiting in line to donate blood after 9/11). (Oct.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Bookmarks Magazine

Most reviewers found Vowell to be a lively guide through the frequently misunderstood Puritan period. Several wrote that she will draw in readers who might not otherwise pick up a book on the subject: what could be better than history with the voice of Violet from The Incredibles? But others found Vowell's treatment to be less dexterous; she slips in jokes where they don't make sense and too often explains the past through pop culture references despite her clear understanding of it through original texts. Those who enjoy traditional history books may be dissatisfied. Yet, as one reviewer noted, Vowell's irreverence frees her to explore the lives of neglected figures such as Anne Hutchinson and to illuminate aspects of the Puritan era that more serious authors might have missed.
Copyright 2008 Bookmarks Publishing LLC

More About the Author

Sarah Vowell is the author of the bestselling Assassination Vacation, The Partly Cloudy Patriot, Take the Cannoli, and Radio On. She is a contributing editor for public radio's "This American Life." She is also a McSweeney's person and the voice of teenage superhero Violet Parr in Pixar Animation Studios' "The Incredibles."

Related Media


Customer Reviews

There are no chapters in the 248 page book, making it a long read, at times a bit tedious on the eyes.
Laureen Kelley
Again, that's not to say this isn't a good and enjoyable book, just that this book might not be the ideal starting point for those looking to give Vowell's work a try.
DPK
Vowell's passion for learning about the details of history and her sense of humor as she shares her search-journey with her readers make this book time well spent.
Patricia Carey

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

108 of 117 people found the following review helpful By L. F. Smith VINE VOICE on October 3, 2008
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I love Sarah Vowell's books. She is an absolute master at examining a historical subject, relating it to the world we live in, and inserting her personal foibles to it, all in a narrative that moves so smoothly and quickly that you're sometimes surprised that you've read the whole book at a sitting. That's what she attempts to do here, but she doesn't quite pull it off this time.

Don't misunderstand me; this isn't at all a bad book. In fact, it's fascinating. It is jam-packed with fascinating information about the Massachusetts Puritans and the religious, social, and historical context of their settlement. Vowell weaves comments about her family background, education, travels, and hopes and fears into the narrative, just as she usually does.

When Vowell's writing works best, it's driven by her quirkiness and her ability to veer off on what seems to be a tangent, then bring everything together in the end. She does that here, but just not as well as in her other books. Perhaps the subject just isn't as susceptible to the Vowell treatment as the subjects of her other books.

I actually enjoyed this book, and I recommend it highly. However, it's just not as good as her other books made me expect it to be. Well worth reading, though.
4 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
66 of 74 people found the following review helpful By Jean E. Pouliot on October 2, 2008
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
There's nothing like a Sarah Vowell book to provide a new slant on a historical period. In "The Wordy Shipmates," she tackles a rather odd era, and one for which most people have definite opinions: the settlement of Massachusetts by the Puritans. Vowell does not reveal that the Puritans were *not* the American version of the Taliban. Certainly, they were fanatical, even by the standards of their own time, and harsh and guilt-ridden to boot. Their endless arguments about the meaning of biblical verses and their extreme hatred and fear of "Papists" put them two steps away from the loony bin. Yet they possessed attitudes (and paranoias) that put them squarely at the root of what would become the American nation character. Having arrived on these shores, by the grace of God, they were ferociously jealous of their freedom from the intrigues and violent interference of the English court and church. Worried sick about takeover by their own government, they were careful to give at least the appearance of subservience to the powerful crown. Vowell's hero is John Winthrop, the first governor of the collection of rude shacks that became the city of Boston. Winthrop is an oxymoron -- a Puritan with a streak of practical morality -- who rules with a weird combination of Christian compassion and tyrannical ruthlessness. Over a fractious and easily offended populace, Winthrop bobs and weaves like a prize fighter, somehow managing to keep his society from fragmenting. Winthrop nearly meets his match with Roger Williams though. Williams, far from being the free-speech champion that we liberals thought him to be, is even more of a Puritan than the Puritans.Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
51 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Currie-Knight TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 11, 2008
Format: Audio CD Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Upon reading this book, I struggled for a few days on how many stars to give this. At times, I really liked Vowell's very personal-essay-like history of the Pilgrims at the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Vowell is very knowledgeable and, at times, is a very good and passionate writer. At times, however, I was also either bored by redundancy, waiting for a seemingly episodic collection of essays to "come together" and read like a book, or annoyed by Vowell's constant employment of sarcasm.

Alas, I chose to give this book 3 of 5 stars. I figure that the best way to explain is to go through a list of pros and cons.

PROS: _________________________________________

Vowell's book on the Pilgrims is obviously a very personal one, and her enthusiasm and passion for the subject shows very well. She recounts not only the tortuous adventure the Pilgrims took from Britian to America and their struggle to build a city, but also tours she has been on, journals she has pored through, and what the Pilgrims mean to her.

The Wordy Shipmates works best - works quite well - when it is read as a collection of themed essays, rather than a flowing book. Once I began to read it in this way, I was better able to admire Vowell's frequent and lengthy asides (where an essay on x quickly becomes an essay on y). Each essay explores some facet about the Pilgrims - their religiosity, their caring nature, their admiration of hard work - but each essay stands on its own more than connects with other essays.

CONS: ____________________________________________

As something of a collection of essays, Vowell can be (quite) redundant.
Read more ›
5 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Summeroz on September 25, 2008
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I got this book last night and I devoured it. I probably should have savored it though. There is so much substance to it that I probably missed so much. That is the beauty of Sarah Vowell. Her books are well researched and there is so much subtle humor and not so subtle humor that is makes learning about something that sounds boring like the puritans (hey she admits this in the book! When she tells people that she was working on a book about Puritans and how people reactions were usually -- well not so enthused) actually interesting. I am not a big non-fiction reader, and when I do read non fiction it usually is not political or American history so enjoying a book like this is a big deal.

The fun thing about reading a Sarah Vowell book is how she will take history and make it relevant to what is happening now or at least put it in a context that you could understand. Who knew there were actually differences between the puritan colonists and comparing them to the differences between the godfather movies would make sense? I actually laughed out loud when she went on to explain her early education about puritans existed solely based on the Brady Bunch and Happy Days episodes. I actually remembered those episodes! She cleverly weaves in these reminisces of Marsha's broken nose with speeches given by Ronald Regan and other great leaders that use words dating back to Winthorp one of these founding Puritans of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Amazing. What is more amazing is how the ideals/motivations of the Puritans to come to American are still what are shaping our foreign policy today.

Although I devoured this book, enjoyed, and would recommend it -- I wouldn't say this is her best book.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?