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The World Is Made of Stories Paperback – August 31, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Wisdom Publications (August 31, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0861716159
  • ISBN-13: 978-0861716159
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #461,421 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"The World Is Made of Stories is about the Master Story; how we are its telling, untelling, and retelling. David R. Loy delivers freedom straight-up in a delightful, variegated collection of wisdom quotes and commentaries. This book is great fun." (Barry Magid, author of Ending the Pursuit of Happiness)

"Drawing on a broad range of religious and secular sources, David Loy's compelling story about stories reveals through a series of clear and penetrating reflections the inescapable presence of narrative in human life." (Stephen Batchelor, author of Confession of a Buddhist Atheist)

"In this slender but powerful book Loy draws the reader's attention to the power of words. He shows how stories have spoken us into existence, how each of us story the world into existence, and how these different stories inform and transform themselves, each other, and us. I consider Loy one of the most important spiritual thinkers of our day." (James Ishmael Ford, author of Zen Master WHO?)

"An inspired, sustained, poetic, and not-quite-linear contemplation of the nature of mind. David R. Loy leads a merry, twisting chase." (Kate Wheeler, editor of Nixon Under the Bodhi Tree)

"Please handle carefully! Some readers may be profoundly unnerved by this book, others will find it deeply liberating--no one, I think, will go away unchanged." (Kurt Spellmeyer, author of Buddha at the Apocalypse)

About the Author

David R. Loy's previous books include the acclaimed Money, Sex, War, Karma, The Great Awakening: A Buddhist Social Theory, and The Dharma of Dragons and Daemons, a finalist for the 2006 Mythopoeic Scholarship Award. He was the Besl Professor of Ethics/Religion and Society at Cincinnati's Xavier University.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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See all 13 customer reviews
This book is an "easy" read with immense depth.
Anu
This is a very deep book, dense with concepts even though it is relatively short (103 pages not including the preface, index, and acknowledgements).
Steven Vogel
David Loy elevates and celebrates it for what it really is...the reality upon which we build and destroy worlds - both individual and collective.
Quantum Leaper

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

34 of 34 people found the following review helpful By M. Scott on September 25, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I enjoyed this new book by David Loy, but first let me explain what this book is not:

It is not a systematic look into the nature of narrative and meaning.
It is not a philosophical tome with tight argumentation.

If the reader is expecting this he or she will be disappointed.

This book is very brief (just 100 pages, it can easily be read in two sittings), and serves more as a buffet of ideas about the nature of life, story, meaning, and enlightenment, that are highly, even contagiously suggestive. In fact a good portion of the book is composed of quotations from various thinkers and writers.

There are no definite conclusions drawn here, it is more of a springboard for further thought, discussion.

It is a fun and enlightening read, and because of its structure and brevity it might be ideal for a book discussion group as well.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Quantum Leaper on October 2, 2010
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David Loy's book is one of those rare finds that can be read over and over again for its deep abiding relevance and deceptively simple wisdom. I received the book yesterday along with 10 others on various topics. I was drawn to Loy's book initially by its size - a mere 103 pages - and began reading a few pages. I finished it in 4 hours. Afterward, I felt more intellectually and spiritually refreshed, more informed, and more transformed than if I had read a much longer and more familiar book on the human experience. I will most assuredly read it again...and again. I teach leadership and management on the university level. I continually emphasize the under-appreciated power of storytelling. David Loy elevates and celebrates it for what it really is...the reality upon which we build and destroy worlds - both individual and collective. The stories - the narrative - we tell ourselves is what occupies our thoughts and compels our actions. Loy asks us in very subtle commentaries on a host of quotes from thinkers both famous and obscure what are the stories that control our lives. I rarely review books on Amazon, but this book is one that needs to be shared...a story that NEEDS to be told.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Steven Vogel on December 7, 2010
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This is a very deep book, dense with concepts even though it is relatively short (103 pages not including the preface, index, and acknowledgements). It consists of short quotes from various authors, philosophers, and famous people regarding stories and myths, each followed by a paragraph or two of the author's commentary. The commentary ties the quotes together in an attempt to show that "the world is made of stories" and what that implies to us. He does this from a Buddhist perspective, but in an intelligent and gentle way that never beat me over the head with it.
I was surprised how much I enjoyed this book. It contains more ideas than you would guess from its small size. While not a Buddhist, I thoroughly enjoyed Loy's perspective on stories as the atoms that make up everything.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By D. McKenzie on November 24, 2010
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This book will change your perspective on how you and others view the world. Best of all, it might help you choose the right stories for you and let go of the ones that just aren't important. My two daughters are too young to read or understand this book but I'm ordering copies for them now to give them for when they're old enough in hope that it answers some big questions they will have. It's a very special book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By applewood on February 3, 2012
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This little book of diverse quotes, and Loy's narrative interludes, weaving and tying the theme of finding our voice, telling our stories and making our meaning (wrestling it from the cold reality of modern sensibilities and primordial vastness....) within the delicate balance of appearance and emptiness, illusion and experience, is delightful. Poetic and yet specific enough to clearly hit home, this is a quick read, easy to understand, yet rewarding to repeat visits. It is playful and profound, and perhaps most importantly, encouraging.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Anu on January 10, 2011
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This is one of the best little books I have read in recent times.
I highly recommend it to any one who has an interest in "truth" beyond story.
This book is an "easy" read with immense depth.
A book you feel to underline every second quote and contemplate deeply what is being said.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Tom Thompson on January 25, 2013
Format: Paperback
Written by a zen teacher, this is an incredible book written for anyone who wants to understand themselves and life more honestly and deeply. Like a good zen master, Loy is pointing out a lot of things for us to consider, often relying on the words and insights of others. He ends many sentences with a question mark ( ? ) as he isn't in the business of giving us the answers, rather the questions that may create the critical mass that lead us to our tipping point. I have read this book twice. I suspect I may read it again someday. Lots of great koans to contemplate. Gassho, David.
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