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The World of Pooh: The Complete Winnie-the-Pooh and The House at Pooh Corner Hardcover – October 14, 2010


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool and up
  • Series: Winnie-the-Pooh
  • Hardcover: 314 pages
  • Publisher: Dutton Children's Books; Reissue edition (October 14, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0525444475
  • ISBN-13: 978-0525444473
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (80 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #12,455 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

A. A. Milne (1882-1956) was a playwright and journalist as well as an author and storyteller.

Ernest H. Shepard (1879-1976) was a cartoonist and illustrator. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.


More About the Author

Alan Alexander Milne was born in London on January 18, 1882, the third and youngest son of a schoolmaster. At age eleven, he won a scholarship to the Westminster School. He went on to attend Cambridge University and became the editor of the undergraduate paper, Granta. After graduating from Cambridge in 1903, Milne moved back to London with enough savings to live for one year. He was determined to become a writer. By 1906, he had been offered the position of Assistant Editor at Punch, a classic British humor magazine. He remained at Punch for the next eight years.
In 1913, Milne married Dorothy de Selincourt (known as Daphne) and moved to a house in London's Chelsea section. When World War I broke out, he enlisted in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, eventually serving in France. During his training period, he wrote his first play, Wurzel-Flummery, which was produced in London in 1917.

By 1919, having completed one book and several plays, Milne finally achieved financial independence. His play, Mr. Pim Passes By, previously staged in London, was produced by the Theatre Guild in New York City. It was as great a success there as it had been on the London stage. Milne was now well established as a witty and fashionable London playwright. In 1920, Christopher Robin Milne was born, an event that was to change the history of children's literature. In 1923, during a rainy holiday in Wales, Milne began work on a collection of verses for children. The result was When We Were Very Young, published in 1924.

Demand for Milne's whimsical work was overwhelming, and in 1926, he duplicated his earlier success with the publication of Winnie-the-Pooh. The sequel, The House at Pooh Corner, followed in 1927. Now We Are Six, another charming collection of verse, followed one year later. It was through these four books, all illustrated by the wonderfully talented Ernest H. Shepard, that Milne acquired a vast audience outside of the theater. In the years since their initial publication, interest in these books has grown and grown.

Milne continued to be a prolific essayist, novelist, and poet until his death in 1956.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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Original edition with cute illustrations.
A. F. Tucker
I love it too, even after reading it every evening for several months now : ).
Sarah
Original Pooh stories are amazing - great for the adult as well as the child.
J. Giesbrecht

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

51 of 51 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 14, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Hi I am a 11 year old who has read this book during the weekend when I was in boarding school I read for the whole weekend and finished it in two days I just kept on reading and I just couldn't put it down it was wonderfull I could just read it again(which is a suprise because I never in my life do I ever do read a book over again)so I geuss that show's how much I like this book so you must read it really do. so diddly pom to you.
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76 of 82 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 9, 2000
Format: Hardcover
I first read Pooh as a child, when my days were spent doing Nothing. It was a good book then, which I really enjoyed.
But I don't do Nothing anymore. Well, not so much. They don't let you. Now my life more often resembles going around and around the tree looking vainly for Woozles, or going bump, bump, bump down the stairs, thinking that there must be a better way, if only I could stop bumping long enough to think of it. Reading Pooh is how I stop bumping.
I need to be reminded that spelling isn't everything - that there are some days when spelling Tuesday simply doesn't count.
Pooh and Piglet are wondering where you've been. Eeyore told them that you're not coming back. "They've forgotten," said Eeyore. "Typical," said Eeyore. "How Like Them," he said.
But you can come back, you know. You can find a Thoughtful Spot, or join an Expotition to find the North Pole, or drop stick off a bridge.
Because the Forest will always be there, and anyone who is Friendly with Bears can find it.
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41 of 42 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 28, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This is the best version of Pooh. Not the contaminated Disney version by any means. This is the pure bear of little brain. This particular version is enhanced by full color paintings by Mr Shephard which will knock your socks off!
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By S on August 24, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This book is good for kids and adults. It is a great way to escape from the daily depressions in our world news. Unlike other books, it provides a fun, innocent adventure that still has the appeal to people of all ages. After a hard day, this book allows you to forget all bad - there is no evil, there is no wrong. highly recommended!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on December 14, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Hello, I'm StoryMaker. While glancing at the bookshelf, I spotted The World of Pooh - an old, brown copy with no dust jacket - and was inspired to review it.

The World of Pooh is a very good book. It is the original, classic, A. A. Milne Pooh, and a lot of it. Timeless & simple, it is a must for young & old. The red-shirt-free, non-Disney, classic Pooh books by A. A. Milne are old, but to this very day satisfy young children. That's the magic about it.

Why is the classic Pooh better than the Disney Pooh? Well, there are plenty of reasons.

First of all, the characters are better. They are not exaggerated like Disney's. They are kinder yet still quite funny. They are really more charming and really better. As some would say, they have higher quality.

Second, A. A. Milne's stories are timeless. You'd think a kid wouldn't care, but seriously. They satisfy generation after generation and don't change over time. (And I'm not talking about the change of the cover and binding and amount of wear & tear!) Look at the changes of Disney's Pooh. First classic animation, then puppets, then CGI. As the world changes, so does Disney Pooh. But A. A. Milne's classics are timeless and can be loved age to age. They're Grandpappy approved! XD

The World of Pooh gathers many Pooh classic stories and puts them in one book. I have a young cousin & his parents have introduced him to A. A. Milne's Pooh and aren't sure they will show him Disney. Good for them! These stories are better. If you have a youngster, I recommend you do the same. You can get The World of Pooh for pretty cheap nowadays, so why not? Also check out A. A. Milne's poem books, When We Were Very Young and Now We Are Six. You'll love 'em, too! Signed, StoryMaker. "Gotta trust the kid's review!"
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Lost John on November 28, 2011
Format: Hardcover
N.B. This review, as are most others here, is of The World of Pooh, not The World of Christopher Robin. As of 3 May 2014, Amazon have got their wires crossed. Check carefully before ordering.

This volume brings together the two classics, Winnie-The-Pooh and The House at Pooh Corner, originally published in 1926 and 1928, and classics they really are. It is understandable that in later life Christopher Robin Milne resented the use his father made of him and his favorite toys for these stories, for the joke is sometimes on CR's childhood naivety and initially faulty but gradually improving spelling, and the picture of him at around the age of six is very intimate. However, positioned a little further away from the father-son relationship, we can thoroughly enjoy the real work of craftsmanship that the stories represent, and appreciate the love that went into them; love not only for Christopher Robin, but it would seem also for A A Milne's own childhood experience.

Pooh, Piglet, Eeyore and the other animals populating The Forest epitomize various characters and attitudes frequently encountered in English middle class life, then and now. Pooh, a dear soul readily persuaded of his lack of intellectual power, and the physically inconsequential and timid Piglet are placed alongside Owl, much given to over-estimating, or at least over-advertising, his own learning, and Rabbit, who sees himself as having a talent and a duty to get other people organized. Eeyore largely keeps himself to himself, and meets unavoidable social encounters with exaggerated pessimism. When newcomers Kanga, with infant Roo, and Tigger are added to the mix, they are initially met with prejudice.
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