The World That Made New Orleans and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $6.63 (27%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 3 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The World That Made New O... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by CWJBOOKS
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: exlibrary hardcover book in jacket with light wear, shows some light reader wear throughout ,all the usual library marks and stamps. spine is broken and split, pages are still intact
Trade in your item
Get a $1.66
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The World That Made New Orleans: From Spanish Silver to Congo Square Hardcover – January 1, 2008


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$18.32
$15.13 $9.44


Frequently Bought Together

The World That Made New Orleans: From Spanish Silver to Congo Square + The French Quarter: An Informal History of the New Orleans Underworld
Price for both: $32.60

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Chicago Review Press; First Printing edition (January 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1556527306
  • ISBN-13: 978-1556527302
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.5 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #714,669 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this thoughtful, well-researched history, Sublette (Cuba and Its Music) charts the development of New Orleans, from European colonization through the Haitian revolution (which was crucial to French and American negotiations over Louisiana) to the Louisiana Purchase. Central to his account are the African slaves, who began arriving in New Orleans in 1719, and their contributions to the city's musical life. He considers, for example, how musical influences from different parts of Africa—Kongo drumming and Senegambian banjo playing—combined to forge a distinctive musical culture. Sublette also lucidly discusses New Orleans' important role in the domestic slave trade, arguing persuasively that the culture of slavery in New Orleans was different from that in Virginia or South Carolina. In New Orleans, there was a large population of free blacks, and slaves there had greater relative freedom than elsewhere. Furthermore, by the early 19th century, Louisiana was home to more African-born slaves than the Upper South. Those factors, which helped perpetuate African religion and dance, combined to offer an alternative path of development for African American culture. As our nation continues to ponder the future of the Big Easy, Sublette offers an informative accounting of that great city's past. 20 b&w photos. (Jan.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From School Library Journal

Adult/High School—This book explores the economic and cultural roots of New Orleans. With the exception of a brief coda that reflects on recent Mardi Gras celebrations, Sublette focuses on the pre-20th-century history that shaped the modern city. The author traces its origins across the Atlantic to 18th-century monarchs and the French Revolution. He follows the city's development chronologically, noting that Spanish explorers and a thriving slave trade with the west coast of Africa also left their mark. These influences are evident in the music and dance whose legacy reaches far beyond the Mississippi Delta. Sublette's style is delightfully readable, avoiding stilted academic prose while maintaining a scholarly approach that is peppered with fascinating details. Filled with period maps, this volume will appeal to history buffs and readers interested in the musical heritage of New Orleans.—Heidi Dolamore, San Mateo County Library, CA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

The author has an engaging style and made this a pleasant read.
H. Campbell
What makes New Orleans different was the size and ability of the African American community to bring in their music and traditions.
Lynn Ellingwood
I highly recommend it to any one interested in the cultural history of my New Orleans.
Becky Warpinski

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I checked this book out when I was planning a trip to New Orleans. Initially I thought it was not what I was looking for but Ned Sublette's style was so laid back and appealing that I kept on turning the pages. When the time came for me to return the book, I wasn't done so I purchased it. The history is fascinating and rich in detail as to why New Orleans is decidedly Caribbean in its history and culture. I never knew how much the Spanish had influenced the creation of New Orleans. I really enjoyed the intricate history of how the French, Haitians, Cubans and Americans also came into play. My only complaint is that there was so little mention of the Native American's influence that I am unsure if that is because they had no real influence or if they were just overlooked.

I hope the publisher comes out with a digital edition of this book. I would love to have it on my Kindle. Like Charles C. Mann's 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus, it is the sort of book I would like to have handy to consult or re-read sections of.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
58 of 67 people found the following review helpful By Frank French on December 13, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This writing covers a lot of territory in a relatively short space. I could have read much more. There are insights and clues into the life of New Orleans from its earliest days as a French and Spanish colony and the first African-American city in the United States. The author indicates the importance of the place historically, economically and culturally. New Orleans appears to have fallen off the radar of most Americans recently, probably due to the fact that most Americans get their information from TV and that medium, being owned an operated by a few corporate interests, has censored the story of the destruction resulting from an apparently avoidable disaster. But the mainstream media has also turned a blind eye to culture in general and that's why this book, and Sublette's other book "Cuba and its Music" are so important. It is as true today as it ever was that being literate is a good way to overcome widespread ignorance. So I recommend reading both of these books as great eye and mind openers.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Alex Halikias on March 29, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I read in bed so I tend to fall asleep after a few pages of a typical book. This book was the exception. Great information on the countries of origin of the different slaves and how they impacted the culture and music of the deep south. I finally understand the influence of the French, Spanish and British on early America. Loved it!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Jason Crane on September 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
Ned Sublette's history of the colonial period in New Orleans is so rich with information that it's almost incredible to believe one 21st-century person wrote it. Sublette makes you feel like you were there, watching as the most unique city in the United States arose through the influences of French, Spanish, African and American cultures. By the end of the book, which takes place just after Katrina, you've gained a deep understanding of why we need New Orleans, and why the rebuilding of this magnificent city must be at the heart of reclaiming of our nation's humanity. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Mark Twain Jr. on April 27, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Ned Sublette is one of the brightest minds alive today. His fusion of historical detail, cultural development and human insight is a wonder to behold. If you think that you know something about American history and its antecedents think again, Sublette has redrawn the map of where we came from and the multiplicity of determinants that brought us to where we are today.
Not Since Robert Farris Thompson has anyone brought to bear such a feast of intellectual gifts and profound freedom from dogma. A work of unrivaled erudition.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A reader on September 20, 2011
Format: Paperback
As the title states, this is about the world that made New Orleans, not so much New Orleans history per se. On that level it succeeds. The text's chatty conversational style is either charming or irritating, but it is at least never dull. But the title might make people think that it is all about the outside influences that shaped the city's official culture. Hardly. It is the story of the culture of color in New Orleans and the musical thread that runs through it. The book's significant weakness is that it jumps, in nearly a single bound, from the music and culture of color (free and enslaved) of the 1850s to the Mardi Gras Indian culture of the 1970s. If the author is trying to prove an unbroken thread between slaves fresh from Africa who kept their musical traditions alive to the Indian music of today, he failed to write an adequate bridge between the two. At least he challenges the belief (which I discuss in my review of another Louisianan themed book) that the Mardi Gras Indians were inspired by a Wild West show that visited New Orleans in the 1880s. There is a lot of good scholarship here that is not well-expressed by continuity. Even casual readers may ask why the 120 intervening years of Jim Crow, Jazz, etc, gets almost no mention. There are too many irrelevant digressions which confuse any continuity even more. As others have noted, this text really needed editorial help in many ways. The political theorizing in the last chapter is not in synch with reality and laughable in its sweeping claims. In this text, I sense a much better, more focused book trying to be born.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Beth Lapides on August 25, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Sublette has done an amazing job pulling together political, cultural and social elements into a very compelling narrative. And super-informative too. Extremely impressive historical writing (and this is coming from a history major).

I LOVE how international and broad the perspective is. He really illuminates the dynamics of the time in a fantastic and vivid way.
It's seriously among the most readable and thorough books I've read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?