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The World in Vogue: People, Parties, Places Hardcover – November 17, 2009


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The World in Vogue: People, Parties, Places + Vogue Living: Houses, Gardens, People + Vanity Fair 100 Years: From the Jazz Age to Our Age
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This Book Is Bound with "Deckle Edge" Paper
You may have noticed that some of our books are identified as "deckle edge" in the title. Deckle edge books are bound with pages that are made to resemble handmade paper by applying a frayed texture to the edges. Deckle edge is an ornamental feature designed to set certain titles apart from books with machine-cut pages. See a larger image.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Alfred A. Knopf; 1 edition (November 17, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307271870
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307271877
  • Product Dimensions: 12.8 x 9.9 x 1.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #189,757 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Look Inside The World in Vogue

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Keira Knightley
(Arthur Elgort)
Miranda Brooks
(Arthur Elgort)
Bride and Groom Dogs
(Bruce Weber)
Iman and David Bowie
(Bruce Weber)

Kate Moss and John Galliano
(Robert Fairer)
Mornington Wedding with Umbrella
(Robert Fairer)
Valentino's Home
(Robert Fairer)


About the Author

Hamish Bowles is European Editor at Large for Vogue. Curator of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s 2001 exhibition “Jacqueline Kennedy: The White House Years,” he has written for such publications as The New York Times and edited the book Vogue Living: Houses, Gardens, People. He lives in New York and London.

Alexandra Kotur is Style Director at Vogue, where she often works on portrait sittings with Jonathan Becker and Annie Leibovitz. She is the author of Carolina Herrera: Portrait of a Fashion Icon. She lives in New York.

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Customer Reviews

Can stare at the photos for hours... thanks!
S. Hull
I bought it to scrutinize the photographs, which are excellent, but have also been greatly appreciating its chronicling of history through fashion and high-society.
J. Doane
I'm rarely driven to write a review but the entire book is just a unstylish grouping of lazy and predictable choices when one expects so much more from Vogue.
walkure

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 40 people found the following review helpful By walkure on November 23, 2009
Format: Hardcover
A harsh review perhaps. Individual short essays on the usual suspects Babe Paley, CZ Guest, Jackie O, the swans... aren't we tired of reading the same thing over and over again? And yes, the black and white ball is in it. If this book is supposed to cover the last 4 decades, couldn't Kotur find more weddings other than the Plum Sykes, Lauren Davis, Dita/Manson and Eliza Reed weddings? Either that or do these represent the most Vogue of the weddings? Putting Gisele and Tom Brady at the latest MET Gala for the cover; is this the best of the Vogue world for the cover? The editor (or perhaps editors - I suspect one totally old-world retro unable to let go of that world of endless fittings and the other totally celebrity-driven with no cultural references before 1999) has nothing to say about the specialness of Vogue or why these choices represent the Vogue world and has no originality. I'm rarely driven to write a review but the entire book is just a unstylish grouping of lazy and predictable choices when one expects so much more from Vogue.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Jesse Kornbluth TOP 500 REVIEWER on December 17, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Vogue's big photo books --- and The World in Vogue: People, Parties, Place serves up 300 gorgeous pictures --- are ruthlessly edited experiences. They buy the glamor myth, and they chart it over time. Their aim is manicured, buffed, air-brushed beauty, life the way it oughta be.

Old people? Never happened. Which makes it disconcerting to see photos of people you know --- or knew, because many have gone on to that place where Vogue can't be delivered --- in the full blush of youth.

Truman Capote's "swans", beautiful people in the Hamptons, Mick Jagger and Jerry Hall in Mustique, Valentino's country house, palaces, gardens --- almost every photograph and most excerpts from the profiles that accompanied them have the same effect. That is, they make you want to be rich. And thin. And young.

And that's the way it goes for 400 oversized pages. Vogue is the InStyle of the upper order; it's one big wet kiss to the people it photographs. Which isn't to say it's unappealing --- it's nice to get all your jealousy from one thick source.

I do note one factual error. The editors claim that, in 1990, "Georgina Howell found Carolyne Roehm exemplifying the spirit of the Working Rich." Yes, she did. But she wasn't the first. I recall a New York Magazine cover story about Roehm called "The Working Rich: The Real Slaves of New York," published in January 1986. The author, I believe, was Jesse Kornbluth.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By J. Landau on November 19, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Each of the last two years as the holiday season approaches, Vogue has published a compilation of the very best of its past editorial pages. Last year's book, "Vogue Living: Houses, Gardens, People", was very reminiscent of the book by a very similar name done forty years ago which has become a classic; the earlier volume goes for $200 or more. The current book is produced in the same very high quality, 400-page large-scale format, but this time with more emphasis on the people part of the equation -- personal profiles, the best parties, most interesting weddings and finest editorial features -- going back as much as fifty years.

The most interesting portion of Vogue each month has often been a few editorial sections toward the end of each magazine, perhaps focusing on the lifestyle of a particularly tasteful individual, an attractive new political figure or someone in the entertainment world who might actually be interesting. Many of the best of these editorial features -- often featuring great fashion -- are now gathered in one large volume and are illustrated the most talented photographers of our time: Horst, Avedon, Penn, etc.

We start by visiting Babe Paley, then attend Truman Capote's famous black-and-white ball as written up by Gloria Steinem. We see the '60s Newport wedding of Peter Beard and Minnie Cushing, two of the most beautiful people of our era; visit gardens from Normandy to the Hamptons and drop in on Mick Jagger in Mustique and Valentino's country house. We particularly welcome a chance to view the art collection of Carlo Ponti and Sophia Loren, starting with six, count 'em, six, full size Francis Bacons, and to see the homes of Paloma Picasso over the years.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Robyn on January 14, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I live vicariously however unrealistically through Vogue and appreciate the good taste and lovely photos so this book is perfect for me. The world of beauty will never become stale in my mind. I would have to disagree that putting Tom Brady and Gisele Bunchen on the cover is a mistake - what better way to epitomizse the combination of the athletic world with the world of fashion? They have indeed become intertwined as has the world of fashion and the world of entertainment. A lovely book to keep ~
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By millicent on September 20, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I own a few hard copy Vogue books, I was expecting this books images to be based around events and opening parties.
It is a beautiful, if it is a first time Vogue coffee table book its a wonderful page turner.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By your neighborhood librarian on May 20, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Does this book qualify as a fetish book? Or a guilty pleasure? Or, in fact, is this book more along the lines of I-gotta-read-it-cause-I-HATE-half-these-people? Like Vanity Fair when it gets all drooly over European royalty. Or quasi royalty. Or anyone with a robber-baron last name. Mellon. Vanderbilt. Astor. Janklow (heh). They're all in here, believe me. Principessas, Crown Princes, the whole lot, with their blonde American wives, too. And it's as infuriating as ever when the editors refer to such beings by their title, even when, as in the case of Pavlos of Greece, such titles have been rendered meaningless by history and by acts of government.

DEEP BREATH.

On the other hand, the overentitled are so pretty. They have cool antiques and rooms with 30-foot ceilings. Collections of Meissen. Gardens measured in acres. Wedding dresses measured in seamstress-hours. They marry people like Peter Beard, one of the best-looking people ever born. And they get photographed by Avedon, Annie Leibowitz, Herb Ritts, Mario Testino, Helmut Newton.

Also, there are models and actresses, and at least two instances of Clooney. So that helps.
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