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The World Who Wants It? Paperback – May 1, 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Black Dog Publishing (May 1, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1904772021
  • ISBN-13: 978-1904772026
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 0.6 x 6.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.5 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,744,769 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

Nicholson offers a biting satiric vision which overturns political hierarchies and gleefully violates American consumer habits. -- Dr Peg Birmingham, De Paul University

Nicholson sees America with astonishing, jaundiced clarity...Buy it, read it and weep! -- Michael Sorkin

From the Publisher

The World Who Wants It? proposes a concrete plan, albeit satirical, for establishing world peace. Set in the near present, the $100 billion that has been pledged by the United States to address the world's wrongs is used to advocate consumptive constraint and to seek new American values, thus lessening the fury of the Third World against America's apparent wastage, misuse of resources, vice and militaristic bombast. In this vision of a new world order, international policy largely focuses on the rebuilding of the city of Jerusalem so as to accomodate all the hopes and aspirations of the three Abrahamic faiths - Christianity, Islam, Judaism.

The starting point for Ben Nicholson's restructuring of the world is the destruction of the World Trade Center, which purported, given its name, to suggest that the building was the center of world trade. When the towers were destroyed they took along with them a myriad of links and responsibilities that course throughout the globe, touching every aspect of life. It is ultimately immaterial what the shape and size of the rebuilt World Trade Center will be, unless the whole world is simultaneously rethought and restructured along with the reconstruction. What, then, would the new world order be?

Customer Reviews

2.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 25, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book takes a fresh and zany look at the world's all-to-familiar, intractable problems. The author goes after these problems by proposing detailed solutions that range from the clever to the bizarre. Though none of these solutions is practical, many are insightful and thought provoking, while others are just deliciously sarcastic. The author leads the reader down a serpentine, quasilogical path, that is a delight to follow. I thought the book was thoroughly enjoyable.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 15, 2004
Format: Paperback
It takes a keen and courageous observer to lay bare the hypocracy of the sole world superpower, and to do so with enough irony and humor to keep a twinkle in a reader's eye. Ben Nicholson is such a writer, and this book gives hope that not everyone is being made subservient to a conservative agenda. In fact, the importance of this book is that it really takes no specific political stance, because really it is outlining a broad critique of quite fundamental American stupidities - not reserved to either Republicans or Democrats.
This book is important because its extreme suppositions and speculations are only implausible within a momentary context - America shows again and again it's ability to go beyond, (for good and for evil), everything we can imagine at this present moment.
But mostly, this is just a good read, building momentum and constructing linkages and scenarios that would make Raymond Roussel proud - had he ever written a political novel.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Donald Sherefkin on November 6, 2004
Format: Paperback
The 9/11 commission blamed the terrorist attacks on our "Failure of Imagination." The kind of imagination that they were referring to was one which could anticipate horrific acts against Americans.

The dismal results of our recent election indicate that we have successfully learned to imagine the worst, and expect leaders who will exploit that fear in the most cynical possible ways.

Ben Nicholson has no failure of imagination. But his imagination is positive, constructive and frequently brilliant. His training as an architect allows him to evaluate a broad array of International issues, and to generate creative and usually unexpected insights into ways of re-imagining solutions.

If you despair over America's response to the world since 9/11, this book will serve as a useful antidote, showing what is possible with a healthy imagination.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jim Molnar on February 24, 2005
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is really a work of speculative fiction which depicts a close parallel universe, branching off from 9/11, where the Bush administration really actively begins the business of world-building in the most conscious, constructive and peaceable way imaginable. While this is of course a fantasy it is certainly explored with such good intentions that we are drawn in from the start. Some of the chapters are a little disconnected and the overall writing is kind of dry but the author's breezily optimistic approach to global re-engineering pretty much wins you over.
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