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The World's Best Street Food: Where to Find it & How to Make it (Lonely Planet Street Food) [Kindle Edition]

Lonely Planet , Austin Bush
3.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (109 customer reviews)

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Book Description

Live to eat? Travel to eat? Here you'll find a collection of the most memorable street food experiences possible, complete with recipes to make sure if you can't go to eat, you can at least get a taste at home! From classic hotdogs to exotic pastries, this gastronomic tour of the world will leave all your sense satisfied.
Inside World's Greatest Street Food:

  • 100 authentic recipes from all around the world
  • Brilliant images throughout
  • In-depth background of each dish, how it came about and what it's like to eat
  • Savoury and Sweet sections
  • Up-to-date recommended points-of-interest - covering eating, sleeping, going out, shopping, activities and attractions

Special eBook enhancements

  • Interlinking enables you to seamlessly flip between pages
  • Search - go straight to what you are looking for with the inbuilt search capability
  • Bookmark - use bookmarks to quickly return to a page
  • Dictionary - look up the meaning of any word
  • Pinch and zoom images and text

Written and researched by Lonely Planet


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Editorial Reviews

Review

"A must for armchair as well as adventure travelers-and cooks." (Leite's Culinaria 2012-12-05)

Product Details


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
42 of 45 people found the following review helpful
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
I eagerly anticipated receiving this book. I enjoy watching the type of TV travel show that involves discovering authentic, local life that tourists usually don't see. It's especially enjoyable when that involves indigenous foods. Rachael Ray and Guy Fieri are two hosts who have done similar shows.

First off, the book is beautiful. The quality of the printing is a cut above and the layout is fun and informative. Each location has a two-page spread - one page describing the street food, with history, local custom and in many cases, where to get a good example of that food. The opposite page gives a detailed recipe how to actually make that food yourself, usually accompanied by a photo of what it looks like.

Having read through from cover-to-cover in a couple of hours, I noted a lot of inconsistencies in how the material was presented to the reader.

A few things you should know, some of which may affect how valuable this book is to you.

1. I assumed the author was well-known British food writer Tom Parker Bowles and that he personally visited each place where each food was served. Mr. Bowles is the son of Camilla Parker Bowles (wife of Prince Charles) so he certainly has the financial means and food experience to take on such an endeavor. But no, Mr. Bowles is only the author of the book's introduction. Each food report is actually written by one of 31 contributing authors. The book does not make clear which, if any, actually ate the foods at the place illustrated.

2. One might assume that the photos of the foods were taken by the person writing about them. Again, not a good assumption. The credits at the end of the book list dozens of photos obtained from stock photo sources like Getty Images.

3.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars For armchair cooks only May 2, 2012
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
The wonderful introduction got me excited and I eagerly paged through this book. But I soon realized the recipes aren't good enough to make this a great cook book, and the pictures aren't good enough and the written information too general to make this a great travel book. (And there's nothing about this book that would qualify it as a "coffee table book".)

Understand that there is no author for this publication. So, an editor came up with the idea to put together a book on street food from around the world. Sounds like a great idea. Then the editor went to work looking for opinions on what street food is the "best" and what street food is "authentic" to a particular region. With those opinions in hand, the editor went looking for pictures and recipes of the so-called "best" street food and paired them together. But a problem arises when there is no one expert or creator that will take responsibility for the validity of the opinions of "best" and the authenticity of the recipes and make sure you can create the recipes in your home and have it look even close to what you see in the pictures.

Street food is not synonymous with simple and easy food--okay, yes, maybe easy to eat, but not easy to make. And, for the most part, these recipes are not suitable for the average-experienced home cook. Most of these recipes sound like they'll taste great, but in most cases, there is a long list of ingredients, some unusual and hard to locate (some impossible to find) ingredients, and a great amount of prep work that will make these recipes major projects.

I live an hour away from (and work very close to) a vast variety of ethnic food sources and I'm always willing and eager to head out on a "field trip" to find special ingredients.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Yum! Yum Yum Yum Yum! May 3, 2012
Format:Paperback|Vine Customer Review of Free Product (What's this?)
Why do I do this?

I choose travel books for review, yet I'm stuck in a wheelchair, and the farthest I've been in the last five years is less than 50 miles. And when I get the travel books, I usually end up in the early hours of the morning, reading and re-reading the sections on food.

And I was the same with this book. It is the worst combination - a book on food that you can find from street vendors around the world, with instructions on how to make it yourself. Within an hour of eating a substantial dinner I was wondering why no-one in the U.S. has made a chain of take-outs and restaurants dedicated to these recipes. And I was only halfway through the "B" recipes, with 100 choices laid out in alphabetical order. A small chain, perhaps, with no more locations than McDonalds, say, and definitely country-wide.

Street Food is a great and cheap way to get tasty things into your hand. It's usually prepared in front of you by the proprietor from fresh ingredients, and because it's made-to-order few or none of the components have been lying around to pick up germs. Over the years, recipes have evolved, but the simplicity needed makes for easily replicated dishes, and that's why this book is great for cooks who want to reproduce the food in their own home.

Of the 100 recipes, around a dozen are rated "complicated," which usually relates to needing a long time to prepare some of the ingredients - these are the ones where you can't just say, "Let's have [this recipe]," and have it ready in minutes. But the other 90 choices are divided pretty much equally into "moderate" and "easy." Basically moderate applies to anything that requires a bit of cooking, and easy, in many cases, just involves putting the ingredients together.
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More About the Author

Raised in rural Somerset, Luke Waterson developed a penchant for travelling at an early age and, following completion of an English Literature and Creative Writing degree at the University of East Anglia, duly set forth to travel the world. With a particular passion for the Americas (he's travelled across the lot of them - north, central and south - overland and for Eastern Europe (he's currently living in Slovakia) Luke writes for Lonely Planet, Avalon Travel Publishing, BBC Travel and a clutch of in-flight magazines.


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