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The Worst Team Money Could Buy Paperback – March 1, 2005


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The Worst Team Money Could Buy + The Bad Guys Won: A Season of Brawling, Boozing, Bimbo Chasing, and Championship Baseball with Straw, Doc, Mookie, Nails, the Kid, and the Rest of the ... Put on a New York Uniform--and Maybe the Best + Faith and Fear in Flushing: An Intense Personal History of the New York Mets
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Editorial Reviews

Review

"[This] lively account of the team's trip from triumph to decline—first written in 1993, updated and reissued this year—will warm the heart of any Cub fan. . . . It's an unvarnished insider's view of what goes on within the game at many levels and a refreshingly honest exercise in self-discovery."—Dan McGrath, Chicago Tribune
(Dan McGrath Chicago Tribune)

“Filled with so many insider battles between and among every faction imaginable—players, coaches, fans, reporters—it almost reads like an election tell-all.”—Time Out Chicago
(Time Out Chicago)

"Exquistie Pain might be an alternate title chosen by long-suffering Mets fans who relive the disastrous 1992 season in this acute, lively, funny, infuriating and well-written book."—Daniel R. Bronson, Sports Literature Association
(Daniel R. Bronson Sports Literature Association)

Review

"[This] lively account of the team''s trip from triumph to decline-first written in 1993, updated and reissued this year-will warm the heart of any Cub fan. . . . It''s an unvarnished insider''s view of what goes on within the game at many levels and a refreshingly honest exercise in self-discovery."-Dan McGrath, Chicago Tribune (Dan McGrath Chicago Tribune )

"Filled with so many insider battles between and among every faction imaginable-players, coaches, fans, reporters-it almost reads like an election tell-all."-Time Out Chicago (Time Out Chicago )

"Exquistie Pain might be an alternate title chosen by long-suffering Mets fans who relive the disastrous 1992 season in this acute, lively, funny, infuriating and well-written book."-Daniel R. Bronson, Sports Literature Association (Daniel R. Bronson Sports Literature Association ) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
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Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 285 pages
  • Publisher: Bison Books (March 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803278225
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803278226
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 6.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #712,822 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By 718 Session on October 28, 2002
Format: Hardcover
I was born a Met fan and will remain one as long as the Mets exist. As I type this, I'm listening to Fred Wilpon talk about how Art Howe is going to turn the Mets around. This after the 2002 Mets, the team with the third highest payroll in baseball, finished last in the National League East.
My thoughts, naturally, turn to this book.
At the end of the abyssmal 1992 season for the New York Mets, Bob Klapisch and John Harper--beat writers for the NY Post and NY Daily News--felt the need to rant, to give the fans the necessary information to answer the question "how could this have happened?" The highest payrolled team in the history of baseball, the team that made Bobby Bonilla the highest paid player ever, finished with the third lowest record in the National League. I mean, we had David Cone, Dwight Gooden and Sid Fernandez in our starting rotation! We got Bobby Bonilla to replace Darryl Strawberry! That ring should have been ours!
Any Met fan reading the above knows what happened on the surface (and what continued to happen in 1993 and --UCK-- 1994), but the deeper story is nastier still.
This book lifts the rock on the Mets and what is crawling underneath is not pretty. The egos alone are ridiculous, but throw in the infighting, the firecrackers, the rape accusations, the press lockouts, and the non-stop party attitude that looks from here like Animal House without the humor.
You've got to feel sorry for Jeff Torborg and Buddy Harrelson, who didn't have a chance with this pack. As you'll see, though, the owner and General Managers also get their due.
NOW I want to see the 2002 edition of this book. This book proved to me that there is tons of stuff that go on behind the scenes. What happened in 2002?
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Travis Scharf on May 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
Bobby Valentine once said something like, "They play 162 seasons a year in New York," and that statement pretty much sums up a baseball man's attitude toward the press. One morning--in April, yet--the season's blown and the reporters are offering up postmortems. The next day, after a victory, the team's back on the right track. Having read New York sportswriting for the past thirty years I can pretty much understand why a ballplayer might want to strangle reporters. They frustrate _me_ with their insistence on answers to questions like, "Why'd you groove that fastball?" or "What made you drop that ball?" Who knows. Who cares. It's that sort of "hard-nosed" reporting that's bred the current generation of colorless and introspective ballplayers who talk in platitudes about "getting the job done." And as authors Klapisch and Harper inadvertantly show, much of the reporters' antagonistic attitude stems from the huge salaries players earn. You can fall on one side of this issue or the other. I've always thought the players should earn whatever the market will bear, whether they're schmucks or not. I've met a lot of people in my life, and many of them have turned out to be successful and even famous and have excelled in many various occupations, but I've never met a single soul who could play baseball at the major league level. It's that rare. Only 750 men can do it. In writing about, shall we say, underachieving ballplayers at the dawn of this big-money era (Bobby Bonilla [here all Mets fans groan] had just signed with the team for a then-insane salary of $29 million over five years) Klapisch and Harper reveal hard hearts and a lot of hostility toward established stars.Read more ›
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By David de la Fuente on March 29, 2002
Format: Hardcover
The competition between newspapers in the New York market of the late '80s and early '90s was a precursor to 24-hour sports networks and the Internet in terms of bringing the personal and the issues of the locker room to the fore. Every paper was printing a game story, so the way to distinguish your coverage was to get the office politics, the behind-the-scenes stuff -- Vince Coleman and the golf club. David Cone and the allegations. Sid Fernandez in the doghouse. Buddy Harrelson, the manager who lost control. Bobby Bonilla and everybody. While the player stuff was interesting, I found this much more intriguing as a study of mass media and competition, and just as valid now as ever. A must-read for anyone interested in sports journalism.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By just one guy on March 1, 1999
Format: Hardcover
Money isn't everything - and the money paid to the star talent the Mets had in Bobby Bonilla, Eddie Murray, Vince Coleman, etc., proves it. Especially when the money certain players earn is being spent on partying - one way to help your team finish last. Worth reading just for what Ron Darling said about Frank Viola's cross-country flight activities.
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By Clem on November 9, 2014
Format: Paperback
I was a huge New York Met fan back in the 1980s. This was the era when if you loved baseball, you either loved or hated this team. Since I started cheering for them back in 1984, two years before most outside the tri-state area knew much about them, I feel I was justified as not being one that “jumped on the bandwagon” as many did when they won it all in 1986, when it seemed as though a dynasty had been born.

Well, unfortunately for the Metropolitans, history had other ideas. Although the Mets had some strong years following the ’86 triumph, they never captured their original magic of that one season. By the time the early 1990s arrived, the team was embarrassingly awful. That’s not to suggest that the owners didn’t try to revamp the team. The executives figured that since their coffers were larger than most, they could simply go out and “buy” a team of superstars to wear the blue and orange and bring back the magic, which is exactly what they did before the 1992 season began. The Mets of 1992 may have been the best team in baseball on paper. The problem was, on the baseball diamond, they stunk.

This book mainly chronicles the 1992 season, yet slowly sutures the teams fall from their championship season six short years ago. The authors, Bob Klapisch and John Harper were actually beat writers from two of the major New York papers, so no one really had better access to the goings ons both on and off the field.

Oh, the drama! There are rape investigations, drugs, press boycotts, sex, drugs, team mates fighting during team pictures, assault charges, and more drugs. Add a lot of injuries to some star players, along with a bunch of guys who simply don’t have the chemistry, and you have one miserable season.
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