Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.
The Wounded Heart of God:... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Shows some signs of wear, and may have some markings on the inside. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $4.85
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 3 images

The Wounded Heart of God: The Asian Concept of Han and the Christian Doctrine of Sin Paperback – February 1, 1993

3.8 out of 5 stars 5 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$25.99
$12.95 $15.55

Top 20 lists in Books
Top 20 lists in Books
View the top 20 best sellers of all time, the most reviewed books of all time and some of our editors' favorite picks. Learn more
$25.99 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

  • The Wounded Heart of God: The Asian Concept of Han and the Christian Doctrine of Sin
  • +
  • Sisters in the Wilderness: The Challenge of Womanist God-Talk
  • +
  • God of the Oppressed
Total price: $56.30
Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Andrew Sung Park is associate professor of theology at United Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio.

He is the author of The Wounded Heart of God, also published by Abingdon Press.

 

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 204 pages
  • Publisher: Abingdon Press (February 1, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0687385369
  • ISBN-13: 978-0687385362
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #116,927 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
I have had the pleasure of attending a lecture given by Prof. Andrew Sung Min. His lecture was quite interesting and informative, but far from what I would call spectacular. It wasn't until I read his book, The Wounded Heart of God, that I began to understand the enormous project he undertook. His lecture was based on his book - a culmination of the Asian concept of Han and the Christian theology of Sin. I have never read a book that more accurately articulates the condition of man as an oppressed being. A condition that is easy to know but hard to explain. Perhaps being Korean, I am privileged to an almost innate understanding of Han. It was then I began to wonder of Prof. Park was unduly optimistic that others would also be attune to the language he uses. While he does highlight influential thinkers who describe a partial understanding of Han (such as Aquinas [p 74], Hegel [p 75], and others) and non-Asian communities that suffer from Han (such as the Israelites and Palestinians), it was his biblical references to a God that also suffers from Han that eventually convinced me of the plausibility of his model (p 122).
However I find one part of his theology problematic. Park's understanding of sin and han is that while they are very closely entwined, they are not the same. "Sin is the volitional act of the oppressors; hand is the pain of the victim" (p12). He views sin as a theological doctrine, while han is a more general world condition. Han is also, among many other things, "the point of contact between JC (Jesus Christ) and suffering humanity and between JC and God. Christ represents the han of the downtrodden to God..." (p 126).
Read more ›
Comment 12 of 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Andrew Park presents a wonderful addition to incomplete Western Christian theology. He states succinctly and with and educated presentation that there are two people involved in every violation of others. As I have come to understand in every war there are two casualities - the dead and the living. I highly recommedn this to anyone with an open mind and a hunger for Truth.

John Schluep, D.Min.
First Congregational Church, UCC
Warriors' Journey Home, Inc. Listen - Speak - Heal
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Christianity of nearly all varieties has been dedicated to converting the "unbeliever". The intent is to convince the "other" to accept what Christians believe as true. The process has always been more complicated than that.
As the early church converted the Greeks, Greek concepts crept into Christian theology.
In 1531, only ten years after the Spanish conquest of Mexico, Juan Diego, a Christianized poor indigenous peasant walking down a path, heard beautiful music and stopped. A woman appeared to him and identified herself as the Virgin Mary. She told him that she wanted the Archbishop to build a temple on that site. Juan Diego dutifully set off to the Archbishop who was less than impressed. Reporting his failure, the Virgin told him where to find roses. When he brought her the roses, she wrapped them in Juan Diego's cloak. Once again, he set off to see the Archbishop. Unwrapping the cloak to free the roses revealed a picture of the Virgin. The Archbishop relented.
A conversion? Of whom? The Virgin spoke to Juan Diego in Nahuatl, not Spanish. The Virgin wanted her temple built not in the city where the Archbishop had planned, but where she appeared: on a sacrificial site dedicated to Tonantzin, the virgin mother of the gods. On Juan Diego's cloak, the Virgin's dress was red, the color of the god Huitzilopopchtli. The blue-green of the background was the color of Ometeotl, the god of natural forces. The Virgin wore a black band around her waist, a local sign of pregnancy.
A simple indian peasant had captured the Virgin Mary from the Spanish, or, if you prefer, the Virgin Mary had sided with oppressed. This appearance of the Virgin is now known as Our Lady of Guadalupe, one of her most important apparitions.
Read more ›
Comment 10 of 15 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is written to examine pain and a deeper concept- Han. It is written with the victim in mind. A must read for those who counsel the grieving, abused, or victimized.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
The sheer volume and magnitude of specious reasoning in this book is nothing short of breathtaking. I expected a book written from the perspective of a Korean Christian, perhaps "contextualized", but instead got a book full of superstitious blasphemy attempting to mask as a "reform" of Christianity. Nearly every theological argument in this book is a complete perversion of one or other important foundation of Christian faith.

The book, and the lauditory cover reviews, make you believe that you are going to learn something about "the asian concept of Han". This leads white-bread red-state evangelicals to think that they are about to learn something that applies to "all of those asian people". However, he describes a "victim theology" which exists only in Korean culture, and that in minority. The concept of "Han" he describes is so foreign to Chinese and Japanese culture as to be repulsive. Any red-state Christian hoping to "bond" with a Chinese or Japanese (or Korean for that matter) person using this "victim theology" is certain to be disappointed.

The author, apparently sensing that his "victim theology" is fringe and not really "pan-asian", goes to great lengths to identify Han with every other victim group in history. Thus, Jews, Negroes (the author's word), Armenians and the list goes on -- all are experiencing "Han", even if they don't know it.

The author goes even further -- animals are victimized by human exploitation, so they too experience "han". And even global warming is an oppression of mother nature, who experiences "han". All of this oppression and victimization wounds the heart of God.

The author very rarely quotes scripture to support his points; and then very briefly and out of context.
Read more ›
2 Comments 6 of 36 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
The Wounded Heart of God: The Asian Concept of Han and the Christian Doctrine of Sin
This item: The Wounded Heart of God: The Asian Concept of Han and the Christian Doctrine of Sin
Price: $25.99
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com

Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: "a wounded heart"