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The Wrestler [Blu-ray] (2008)

Mickey Rourke , Marisa Tomei , Darren Aronofsky  |  R |  Blu-ray
4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (393 customer reviews)

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Region 25432 encoding (This DVD will not play on most DVD players sold in the US or Canada [Region 1]. This item requires a region specific or multi-region DVD player and compatible TV. More about DVD formats.)

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The Wrestler [Blu-ray] + Black Swan [Blu-ray] + Requiem for a Dream (Director's Cut) [Blu-ray]
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Product Details

  • Actors: Mickey Rourke, Marisa Tomei, Evan Rachel Wood
  • Directors: Darren Aronofsky
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, AC-3, Color, DTS Surround Sound, Dubbed, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English (Dolby TrueHD), French (Dolby Surround), Spanish (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish
  • Dubbed: Spanish
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Fox Searchlight
  • DVD Release Date: April 21, 2009
  • Run Time: 109 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (393 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B001TOD9VI
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #25,539 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Wrestler [Blu-ray]" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Within the Ring - A no holds barred one on one with real wrestlers and filmmakers.
  • The Wrestler Music Video - Performed by Bruce Springsteen

  • Editorial Reviews

    Amazon.com

    The mystery of Mickey Rourke's career comes to a grungy apotheosis in The Wrestler the much-battered actor's triumphant return to the top rope. He plays Randy "The Ram" Robinson, a heavily scarred and medicated battler who's twenty years past his best moment in the ring. But he still schleps to every second-rate fight card he can get to, stringing out the paychecks (more likely a fistful of cash) and nursing what's left of his pride. His attempts to adjust to a more normal kind of life form the most absorbing sections in the movie, whether it's flirting with a stripper (Marisa Tomei is in good form, in every sense), establishing a bond with his understandably angry daughter (Evan Rachel Wood), or working behind the deli counter at a nondescript megastore. Rourke is commanding in the role; he obviously spent hours in the gym and the tanning salon, and his ease with the semi-documentary style adopted by director Darren Aronofsky allows him to naturalistically interact with the colorful real-life wrestlers who crowd the movie's ultra-believable locations. All of which helps distract from the film's overall adherence to ancient formula. You might find yourself waiting for the scene where the risk-taking Aronofsky (Requiem for a Dream) pulls the switch and reveals his true motives for pursuing this otherwise sentimental story, but there's no switch. The Wrestler is an old-fashioned hoke machine, given grit by an actor who doesn't seem to be so much performing the role of ravaged survivor as embodying it. --Robert Horton

    Stills from The Wrestler (Click for larger image)



     

    Product Description

    Mickey Rourke gives the performance of a lifetime as pro wrestler Randy "The Ram" Robinson, a former superstar now paying the price for twenty years of grueling punishment in and out of the ring. But he's about to risk everything to prove he has one more match left in him: a re-staging of his famous Madison Square Garden bout against "The Ayatollah." Darren Aronofsky directs a powerful cast in this action-packed saga of guts, glory and gritty determination that is "as irresistible as a headlock" (New York Post ).

    Customer Reviews

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews
    173 of 187 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars The resurrection of Mickey Rourke March 4, 2009
    Format:DVD
    I've been a wrestling fan since the '70s and it's one of those things that I have to hide from most people because they think it's a joke or they just don't understand what it's appeal is. Then came along "The Wrestler" and now my friends are asking me questions and taking interest in "the business". I saw the movie with some friends and family and we had some very spirited discussions afterward. They couldn't believe that these guys would, for example, mutilate themselves to have blood in matches (a practice called "blading" that's performed with a small piece of a razor blade), or that years spent in the ring will leave most wrestlers battered and even disabled thanks to the legit wear and tear that wrestling has on the body. Most people assume a wrestling ring is a trampoline, but it's actually like landing on concrete and over time there's a price to pay for taking bumps on such a hard surface for so many years. "The Wrestler" reveals all of these issues wrapped up in an enthralling and emotional motion picture you wont soon forget.

    Life imitates art on several levels in "The Wrestler". For example, the movie shows the dark side of steroid abuse that has caused a laundry list of wrestler deaths in just the past 10 years (the pressures of the Monday Night War era claimed the lives of countless wrestlers). Well, during the first backstage wrestling scene, Mickey Rourke's character shakes hands with a wrestler that is huge and jacked to the gills. That wrestler died from heart failure a few weeks before the movie's release. Also, there is a scene where another huge and overly muscular wrestler sells several illegal muscle enhancers to Rourke's character. That wrestler was recently arrested for selling drugs.
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    35 of 36 people found the following review helpful
    5.0 out of 5 stars The fighter still remains January 15, 2009
    Impressed by Mickey Rourke's Golden Globe winning speech, I decided to go see this movie.

    Randy 'The Ram' Robinson fought the Ayatollah in Madison Square Garden back in the 80s, and still battles today. Ill met by fate, bruised and battered, his sinewy muscles scarred, his bones creaking in protest he still has the fight, and like a One Trick Pony he sticks to what he knows. It's a desperate life.

    As you may recall in Raging Bull, Robert De Niro put on about 40 pounds to play fighter Jake La Motta as he got older, and he won an Oscar for his dedication to the role.

    Mickey Rourke does something no less astounding here, putting on huge bulk to assume the persona and convincing physique of a professional wrestler. It's the most amazing acting performance of the year. The lines between actor and character blur and disappear. The kind of pain you see on Randy's face cannot be pretended. It can only be relived from the actor's parallel experience, which is what makes Rourke's performance so compelling.

    For female companionship, he goes to a local bar, where a fetching stripper played by Marisa Tomei, Academy Award winner for My Cousin Vinny, gives him a lap dance for a fee. He can barely make rent, yet he has priorities.

    Marisa gives an incredibly authentic performance, and it's a welcome surprise see her take it off in the name of art. I applaud her courage in doing so. Her physique is simply amazing, and her body art is very intriguing.

    Evan Rachel Wood plays his estranged daughter. Previously, she played the female lead part in Across The Universe, and already has a quite impressive filmography under her belt. Here she sports a different look, and gives a perfect performance.
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    25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
    Growing up in the 80s, Mickey Rourke was James Dean to me. His part was too small for me to notice him in BODY HEAT. The critics had caught a glimpse of him and his potential in that film. I knew that I was on to something watching him as the fast talking womanizing Baltimore con-artist Boogie, in Levinson's DINER. His honesty as an actor pierced my emotions, even though he was playing a character that was lying throughout the entire film. When I witnessed his serene and suicidally introspective portrayal of The Motorcycle Boy in Coppola's urban dreamscape of S.E. Hinton's teenage angst novel RUMBLE FISH, I knew that I had just witnessed The Rebirth of James Dean. When I saw his cool slowburning streetwise Italian dreamer, Charlie in THE POPE OF GREENWICH VILLIAGE, I knew I had found a film actor I could idolize. I wore my hair like him. I tried to dress like him. I wanted to be him. Man, this was the COOLEST actor taking the coolest parts in Hollywood! Mickey was IT!

    But, like Dean, it seemed that Mickey would metaphorically and almost literally crash and leave us with only three truly GREAT films. After a few briefly compelling performances in the 80s as the hardboiled Kowalski in Cimino's YEAR OF THE DRAGON, the lascivious John in 9 1/2 WEEKS, Harry Angel in ANGEL HEART, and the hilarious Henry Chinaski in BARFLY, Mickey's career dwindled into lesser leads, bit parts, and cameo roles. Mickey became "difficult" to work with. Mickey wanted to give up the studio politics and the collaborative involvement with a craft that he was, quite literally, born to do. And become what? A boxer? The owner of a hair salon? A biker? A thug? Then, Mickey lost himself for 14 years. In a reply to a ten year hiatus question backstage at The Golden Globes, Rourke said, "Let's get it right.
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