Qty:1
  • List Price: $26.00
  • Save: $1.30 (5%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Usually ships within 1 to 3 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: ex-library with markings, clean pages.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Writing Life of James D. Watson Hardcover – September 28, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-0879697006 ISBN-10: 0879697008 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $24.70
15 New from $17.43 28 Used from $3.37 3 Collectible from $14.95
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$24.70
$17.43 $3.37
Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Save up to 90% on Textbooks
Rent textbooks, buy textbooks, or get up to 80% back when you sell us your books. Shop Now

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 193 pages
  • Publisher: Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; 1 edition (September 28, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0879697008
  • ISBN-13: 978-0879697006
  • Product Dimensions: 9.4 x 6.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,574,342 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The Double Helix would on its own have established James Watson's reputation as a writer...But Watson's textbooks have also given scientists, particularly students, a deeper understanding of genes and cells. And his popular-science books have given the public a new image of scientific research...The Writing Life of James D. Watson provides valuable insights into the process that led to this success. Nature In this magnificent book, Friedberg celebrates a scientist whose contribution to humanity does not end with experiments and scientific papers, who also established a novel writing style, and for whom conveying information to scientists and the public became a lifelong priority. Throughout the book, Watson's insight, his great call for mentoring and teaching, and his sense of humor emerge, reminding us of Albert Einstein's words, 'Teaching should be such that what is offered is perceived as a valuable gift and not as a hard duty.' JAMA Writing about molecular biology for readers without backgrounds in chemistry presents a very real challenge. Friedberg (Univ. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas) focuses on Watson's writing for public consumption rather than on his scientific research papers. He shows that Watson made major inroads in describing scientific endeavor to nonscientists, and he illustrates Watson's exceptional ability to capture the significance of advances in molecular biology over the past half century without becoming bogged down in jargon and detail. Not only does Watson's ability to write well come across, so also does his great desire to share the story of science and make it readable. Though this book focuses on Watson's approach to writing, it is as intriguing a science biography as one might ever hope to find. Written for all audiences, it will be of special interest to those entering science and those who want to understand the relationships of writing and publishing to the scientific enterprise. Choice

More About the Author

Errol Friedberg was born in South Africa in 1937 and immigrated to the US in 1963. He is a trained pathologist and molecular biologist who works in the field of DNA damage and repair. He published the first textbook on this topic ("DNA Repair") in 1984 and has since contributed two editions of a more comprehensive text ("DNA Repair & Mutagenesis") with multiple co-authors. Friedberg has a passionate interest in the history of molecular biology and related topics. He has published a history of the DNA repair field ("Correcting the Blueprint of Life-An Historical Account of the Discovery of DNA Repair Mechanisms") as well as a book on the writings of James Watson, the famous co-discoverer of the structure of DNA and the author of "The Double Helix", entitled "The Writing Life of James D. Watson". Friedberg is a professor at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas and has documented a history of this institution ("From Rags to Riches: The Phenomenal Rise of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas"). Most recently he has completed an authorized biography of another famous pioneer of molecular biology, Sydney Brenner ("Sydney Brenner: A Biography"). In 1992 Friedberg published a small book on cancer for lay readers ("Cancer Answers-Encouraging Answers to 25 Questions You Were Always Afraid to Ask").


Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
0
3 star
2
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
This is a rather odd fish of a book, in that it is not in any sense a biography of James Watson of DNA-double helix fame, although the opening chapter leaps and bounds through his educational upbringing and career as a scientist and administrator. Friedberg intends, instead, to talk about James Watson the science writer, both with respect to his two autobiographical books and his science textbooks, e.g. "Molecular Biology of the Gene" and "Molecular Biology of the Cell", and to give Watson a pioneering place in the history of science writing. Friedberg rightly points out the strong influence of the two textbooks titles mentioned, to the point where one professor wrote a letter to one of Watson's co-authors on "Molecular Biology of the Cell" that she was returning her advance royalty on a cell biology textbook that she had intended to write, but gave up after "Molecular Biology of the Cell" appeared.

However, Friedberg defangs his own intent in his foreword when he says that "I do not attempt to deconstruct Watson's literary style and influences or to probe his beliefs and innovations". Furthermore, he actually partly contradicts this statement in the opening chapter, where he talks about Watson being surrounded by good books in his childhood, for example. The tone of discussion of Watson's major textbooks is fairly adulatory, if in a dry, understated way.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Hardcover
This is a rather odd fish of a book, in that it is not in any sense a biography of James Watson of DNA-double helix fame, although the opening chapter leaps and bounds through his educational upbringing and career as a scientist and administrator. Friedberg intends, instead, to talk about James Watson the science writer, both with respect to his two autobiographical books and his science textbooks, e.g. "Molecular Biology of the Gene" and "Molecular Biology of the Cell", and to give Watson a pioneering place in the history of science writing. Friedberg rightly points out the strong influence of the two textbooks titles mentioned, to the point where one professor wrote a letter to one of Watson's co-authors on "Molecular Biology of the Cell" that she was returning her advance royalty on a cell biology textbook that she had intended to write, but gave up after "Molecular Biology of the Cell" appeared.

However, Friedberg defangs his own intent in his foreword when he says that "I do not attempt to deconstruct Watson's literary style and influences or to probe his beliefs and innovations". Furthermore, he actually partly contradicts this statement in the opening chapter, where he talks about Watson being surrounded by good books in his childhood, for example. The tone of discussion of Watson's major textbooks is fairly adulatory, if in a dry, understated way. Given that Watson was still very much around and influential at the time of Friedberg writing this book, and that this book is published from Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press, even though he states that Watson did not interfere or intrude in any way with the book's production or content, Friedberg understandably knows which side his bread is buttered on with respect to any sort of 'criticism'.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images