The Year Money Grew on Trees and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $2.87 (18%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 1 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
The Year Money Grew on Tr... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all it is still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Year Money Grew on Trees Hardcover – September 6, 2010


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$13.13
$4.23 $0.01
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
Gifts%20for%20Young%20Readers
$13.13 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 1 left in stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Frequently Bought Together

The Year Money Grew on Trees + Black Radishes + Shooting Kabul
Price for all three: $27.11

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Kindle FreeTime Unlimited
Free one month trial
Get unlimited access to thousands of kid-safe books, apps and videos, for one low price, with Amazon FreeTime Unlimited. Get started for free. Learn more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 10 - 14 years
  • Grade Level: 5 and up
  • Lexile Measure: 810L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers (September 6, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0547279779
  • ISBN-13: 978-0547279770
  • Product Dimensions: 5.5 x 1 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,757,699 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 5-8–An old-fashioned quality permeates this story of a 14-year-old who is hornswoggled by an elderly neighbor in the early 1980s near Farmington, NM. Lured by the promise of gaining ownership of her apple orchard, Jackson agrees to conniving Mrs. Nelson's proposal that if he does all the work and gives her the first $8,000 of proceeds, she will give him the deed to the land. The contract is signed at a lawyer's office. Jackson is as wily as his neighbor, and he manages to gain a work crew of his sisters and cousins, overcomes his mother's resistance, and is amazingly resourceful at handling each obstacle as it appears. The story will be especially appealing to those hoping to promote a solid work ethic and an economical attitude that the recent Wall Street woes have brought back to the fore. The focus on the tremendous amount of labor involved and the battle of man versus nature gradually heightens the suspense, as the possibility of success seems doomed. Closest to Gary Paulsen's Lawn Boy (Delacorte, 2007) in its exploration of work, this novel is much more realistic and less tinged with fantasy elements. The pride Jackson feels in his ability to meet the challenges exemplifies the traditional values that permeate each page, and yet he is no hero; he is clearly in over his head and knows it, which rescues the story from being preachy or priggishly pompous. This is a book that is cutting-edge 2010 in its appeal to 19th-century values.Carol A. Edwards, Denver Public Library, CO
© Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

From Booklist

Most fiction is about how to do something intellectual, like solve a mystery, or emotional, like fall in love. This, however, is about how 14-year-old Jackson Jones does something extremely practical: grow apples. At first it seems to be a get-rich-quick scheme. Mrs. Nelson’s son doesn’t want anything to do with his late father’s orchard, and Mrs. Nelson promises Jackson the orchard itself if he can raise and sell $8,000 worth of fruit. Although he enlists his sisters and cousins, the amount of work that comes with the orchard—pruning, fertilizing, picking, selling—is enormous. Can he pull it off? And if he does, will Mrs. Nelson stick to her part of the bargain? There’s a lot here about farming (complete with fine spot illustrations of equipment and irrigation systems) that not every reader will enjoy. But there’s also a strong sense of the satisfaction that comes with ambition, hard work, and finally success that will pull many kids along. Between the math, the growing, and the people skills, this is a unique book, and one where readers will learn something right along with Jackson. Grades 5-8. --Ilene Cooper

More About the Author

Aaron R. Hawkins is originally from New Mexico, where his first novel is based. He has also spent lots of time in California going to college and working as an engineer. His current day job is as an electrical engineering professor. He lives in Provo, Utah with his beautiful wife and three energetic kids. For more information go to: www.aaronhawkins.com

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
27
4 star
14
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 41 customer reviews
The characters are very real and personal.
K. DiCaro
Jackson also learns the value of hard work and he and his cousins all develop a good work ethic.
ChristineMM
To sum up, I think middle-grade kids will like this book and find the message empowering.
Cathe

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By CCGal VINE VOICE on September 4, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
The Year Money Grew On Trees is an excellent storyline about a 14 year old boy who is given the opportunity to come into ownership of an apple orchard. The catch? He has to make $8000 from it the first year... and he doesn't have anyone to help! Soon young Jackson finds himself recruiting and paying his friends and family to help him out. This child-run orchard business begins to solidify friendships, help youth grow into adults, and reinforce the idea that responsibility and hard work do pay off in the end. There are heartwraming moments, learning to deal with adults in a calm and respectful manner (even if they aren't being fair), and lessons in economics and science. As a teacher I would recommend this book for 5th-8th graders. The numerous subjects covered in math, social studies, science, and language arts makes this a great book to integrate into other subjects in your classroom. Plus, the heartwarming relationships and growth of the soul make this a student-friendly read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Cathe VINE VOICE on August 5, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
To avoid a summer job working at the scrap yard for a bullying boss, 13-year-old Jackson lets his weird neighbor, Mrs. Nelson talk him into getting her apple orchard up and running--even though he has no idea how to do it. He signs a contract that he will pay her $8,000 and she promises she will leave the orchard to him in her will. With the help of his siblings and cousins--plus lots and lots of hard work--it looks like he will have a bumper crop. But . . . he's not sure he will earn enough money to pay Mrs. Nelson, never mind his cousins and siblings. To make it worse, Mrs. Nelson's not sure she will leave him the orchard after all . . .

This book was well-written and moved along nicely. It was a feel-good book showing that hard work pays off and how people are willing to help if you let them. Those into mechanics will enjoy the drawings of the machinery and tools used in apple production and there are plenty of calculations to follow along with for those into math. I was not surprised to find that this book was written by an engineer!

There were a few things I didn't like so much. The main think I disliked was how Jackson lied through the whole book about so many different things and there were no consequences at all because if it . . . and there wasn't even that much tension about him being found out. A couple of other things that bothered me were how some threads got started but were not followed up on. There was this whole big deal about this odd librarian who didn't want kids in her library and wouldn't help them find books, but Jackson manages to check out the apple growing book. Then he drags the book to the orchard day after day, even leaving it in the mud overnight, and there is no mention of how the librarian reacted when he returned the book.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By K. DiCaro on September 8, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a wonderfully written story about hard work, accomplishment, the importance of family and doing the right thing. The characters are very real and personal. It's perfect for a family to read aloud together- just enough silly stuff for the kids with a good dose of eighties references for the adults. It's clean, engaging and has a strong moral message.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jared Castle TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 6, 2011
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Parents looking to instill traditional values of hard work, responsibility and sacrifice into their children have a friend in author Aaron Hawkins, whose first book draws from own childhood experience tending an orchard. In a time when most young reader books feature magicians, dragons and ancient mysteries, Hawkins crafts a simple, practical story drawn from his own childhood.

Hawkins introduces us to Jackson Jones, a quiet boy in need of a summer job and facing dreary prospects. Without understanding his responsibility (or informing his parents), Jackson signs a contract to farm his neighbor's apple orchard. With an $8,000 payment due at the end of the contract, it is up to Jackson and his merry band of friends and family to tend to an orchard of 300 trees and bring the apples to market.

The heartwarming book is set in the early 1980s and reflects the family values of The Cosby Show and Family Ties, two sitcoms of that era. Parents will recognize the cultural references that young children won't; still, young readers will have no trouble relating to the kids' obstacles and motivations.

In summary, this down-to-Earth adventure is a welcome change from the flood of Harry Potter rip-offs spilling off the shelves. While
...Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on September 20, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I wish there were more books like this available for kids today. It's a terrific story about hard work, learning to understand grown-ups, self-sufficiency, and independence.

The narrator, a 12 year old boy, is offered the chance to earn an apple orchard if he works hard enough and makes 8,000 dollars from the apples in the orchard. He gets his cousins and siblings to help him, but he doesn't tell them how much of the money they earn he is going to have to give to the old woman who owns the orchard. They learn to work together, develop people skills, practice a bit of math, find out about apples and how to care for the trees, and they all grow up a little bit over the course of the year. It's an excellent book for modeling a strong work ethic, self-reliance, and self-motivation.

It's not for helicopter parents, and even a few free range parents may flinch a little at the scenes where the 12 year old protagonist learns to siphon gasoline or spray apple trees with toxic chemicals.

The main character learns to see the adults around him from a more mature, understanding perspective- one of my favorite examples of this is the relationship between the boy and his Sunday School teacher, who raises apples himself. At the beginning of the year the boy, like all the other kids in class, sees the teacher as dry and boring, and one of them ever pay attention in class. Through the course of the year the young man learns to know this elderly teacher better as he asks him for advice about his apples. Towards the end of the book he is sitting in class and wondering what the teacher is doing differently, as the he is telling the story of The Good Samaritan in more interesting fashion than he ever has before.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?