Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror: Eighteenth Annual Collection (Year's Best Fantasy & Horror) Paperback – July 28, 2005


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$6.00 $0.01

King of Thieves by Evan Currie
King of Thieves by Evan Currie
Check out Evan Currie's new stand-alone adventure. Learn more | See all by author

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The 18th volume in Datlow's well-regarded series continues to take the pulse of contemporary fantastic literature with intriguing results, but without Terri Windling, Datlow's co-editor through volume 16, some of the fantasy selections, chosen by Small Beer publishers Link and Grant, fail to conjure the elusive magic all great fantasy needs. Luckily, Datlow's more seasoned eye has discovered enough chilling horror to make the anthology a must-buy. Culled from author collections, literary and trade magazines, anthologies and online sources, the 44 stories and poems reflect a distinctly global flavor and avoid traditional tropes and topics. The standouts include haunting selections from such well-known authors as Peter Straub (two prose selections), Alice Hoffman, Christopher Fowler, Chuck Palahniuk, China Miéville, John Farris, Douglas Clegg, Joyce Carol Oates, John Kessel and Gregory Maguire. Exceptional contributions from lesser-known talents include Mélanie Fazi's "The Cajun Knot," Shelley Jackson's "Here Is the Church," M. Rickert's "Cold Fires" and Terry Dowling's "Clownette." (Aug.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Anyone worried about original coeditor Terri Windling's replacement last year by Kelly Link and Gavin J. Grant should chill now. Their second year aboard this annual excursion on the high-quality seas of fantasy, light and dark, shows no decline in quality or quirkiness from their maiden voyage, though with original coeditor Datlow still in service, fans needn't have worried. Here one still gratefully finds so extraordinarily well wrought an exercise in fantastic literary realism as Peter Straub's "Mr. Aickman's Air Rifle" (how well wrought? John O'Hara might envy the dialogue). Here is one of the most grotesque stories imaginable, Chuck Palahniuk's "Guts," which, Datlow remarks, "contains some rather graphic elements" (it's about a very private pastime of 13-year-old boys). John Kessel's weirdly jolly rural grunge fantasy, "The Baum Plan for Financial Independence," may be less surprising, but the book wouldn't be as good without it, or without Andy Duncan's exquisite essay in biographical fiction, "Zora and the Zombie," about Zora Neale Hurston's anthropological researches in Haiti. As usual, lots of excellent genre reading. Ray Olson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

"Barefoot Dogs" by Antonio Ruiz-Camacho
An unforgettable debut of linked stories that follow the members and retinue of a wealthy Mexican family forced into exile after the patriarch is kidnapped. See more

Product Details

  • Series: Year's Best Fantasy & Horror
  • Paperback: 608 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; 18th edition (July 28, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312341946
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312341947
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.4 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #194,722 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

I've been a fan of The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror for a number of years now.
Tennessee Taz
Be warned though, some of these stories are not for the squeamish ("Guts" was very grotesque, but I've also never laughed so hard in my life, what a great story!)
Simisola
Definitely a few good stories, but that is not the case for a fair chunk of it, unfortunately.
Blue Tyson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By K. Freeman on September 14, 2005
Format: Paperback
A modified editorial team created this eighteenth edition of the classic yearly anthology.

The recaps of the year's fiction and other media are still present, though a bit less inclusive than in the past. The stories that I thought were the strongest were by Gregory Maguire, Margo Lanagan, Stepan Chapman, Tanith Lee, Catherynne M. Valente, Conrad Williams and Elizabeth A. Lynn, with a particular mention for Laird Barron's creepy, poetic western "Bulldozer". The mix of new and established writers, visible in that list, adds interest. As in the past, the stories tend toward urban/modern-day settings, but a few do represent the historical and otherworld facets of the genre.

If any story in the anthology is controversial, it'll be the Chuck Palahniuk. I didn't like it -- I thought it read sort of like a grade schooler's gross-out combined with a careful reading of the Anatomy and Physiology Coloring Book -- but on the other hand, it does take something really gross to gross me out these days. And gross me out it did. Recommended for strong stomachs (heh) only.

On page 466 my story "The Elf Knight and Lady Isabelle" from the anthology CLOAKED IN SHADOW got an honorable mention.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Vicki L. Plant on September 15, 2005
Format: Hardcover
continues to provide an avenue to wonderful short stories in the fantasy and horror genre, along with excellent essays on what is going on in the field. I wish I had the time and resources to track down and read all of their recommendations. The series has not diminished with the departure of Terri Windling.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror: Eighteenth Annual Collection collects the best (as determined by the editors) short fiction of both genres in 2004, using wide definitions of the genres in order to build a diverse, quality collection. Introductions of middling quality summarize the year in fantasy, horror, and related media, but the bulk of the book is 44 short stories and poems which span paranormal horror to imaginary world fantasy. For a change, the horror selections are the volume's strength; some of the fantasy is quite good, but there are too many duds. All in all, a successful installment in the series, but the fantasy selections want for Windling's keener eye. Recommended.

It takes a too long for this installment to warm up: the first few selections, both fantasy and horror, are either over the top or unremarkable. Miéville's "Reports of Certain Events in London" is the tenth selection and the turning point. A unique, haunting story in its own right, the overall quality of the selections that follows is an improvement. There are still some disappointments, but a number of the stories and poems in this installment are wonderful, most of them in the second half of the volume: along with Miéville's story, Palahniuk's "Guts," Oates's "Stripping," Lanagan's "Singing My Sister Down," Eekhout's "Tales from the City of Seams," and Smith's "The Specialist" were my favorites. Unusual for the Year's Best Fantasy and Horror series (at least what I've read of it so far), many of the volume's better selections are horror. Link and Grant are competent but not exceptional editors, and their selections are likewise; the fantasy selections wants for Windling's influence.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Simisola on September 23, 2005
Format: Paperback
I look forward to this collection every year, but I must admit this 18th annual collection was one of the best ever. I am a huge horror fan and usually just skip over the scifi stories, but began to read the scifi stories as well this time and to my great pleasure, really enjoyed these as well. For anyone who enjoys a good short story or good literature of any type I highly recommend this collection. Standout stories by Alice Hoffman, Joyce Carol Oates and the best short story by Peter Straub I've ever read will greatly please. Be warned though, some of these stories are not for the squeamish ("Guts" was very grotesque, but I've also never laughed so hard in my life, what a great story!) As always, I greatly enjoyed the summations at the beginning of the book - they always give me the names of new books and authors I haven't discovered yet to look into. The overall quality of the stories is far superior from any of the other "horror" collections out there today and this particular collection is not to be missed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Every year I eagerly look forward to this anthology by Ellen Datlow (et al)--and this year the fiction seems even better than expected. From the dark and eerie to the purely fantastical, you will find some of the very best writing--and ideas that will stretch your brain as well. A few of my favorites include Philip Raines and Harvey Welles "The Bad Magician," Jeffrey Ford's "A Night in The Tropics," and short stories by Peter Straub, Joyce Carol Oates, Tanith Lee, John Kessel and more. Highly Recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Tennessee Taz on December 26, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've been a fan of The Year's Best Fantasy and Horror for a number of years now. I like the idea of short stories because they are quicker for me to get through. I also love fantasy and horror and The Year's Best never fails to please me with the range of stories and authors. While there may be stories I don't particularly care for, there are always more stories that I do enjoy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again