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The Young and the Digital: What the Migration to Social Network Sites, Games, and Anytime, Anywhere Media Means for Our Future Paperback


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The Young and the Digital: What the Migration to Social Network Sites, Games, and Anytime, Anywhere Media Means for Our Future + The Digital Divide: Arguments for and Against Facebook, Google, Texting, and the Age of Social Networking
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Beacon Press (September 7, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0807006165
  • ISBN-13: 978-0807006160
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.9 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #502,111 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“With thorough research, deep thinking, and lively prose, Watkins adds enormously to our understanding of how the combination of new media and a new generation is changing the world. Read this refreshing book to understand our future!”
—Don Tapscott, coauthor of Wikinomics and author of Grown Up Digital
 
“The best and most nuanced report yet from the digital frontier.”
—James Paul Gee, author of What Video Games Have to Teach Us about Learning and Literacy
 
“A must-read for parents and educators!”
—Anastasia Goodstein, author of Totally Wired: What Teens and Tweens Are Really Doing Online

The Young and the Digital is remarkably readable. Maybe even more remarkable is what a focused account Watkins has produced about a media climate that is still in flux, in which he ponders questions that may not be answered until this moment in media history has long passed.”
—Belinda Acosta, Austin Chronicle
 
“Bracing yet reassuring, often surprising, and always substantive, Craig Watkins acts as an honest broker, testing the contradictory claims often made about young people’s digital lives against sophisticated fieldwork.”
—Henry Jenkins, author of Convergence Culture: Where Old and New Media Collide

“Watkins convincingly captures the digital world inhabited by today’s young adults while illustrating what the digital landscape means for our future.” —Michael X. Delli Carpini, dean, Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania 

About the Author

S. Craig Watkins writes about youth, media, technology, and society. He is associate professor of radio-TV-film at the University of Texas at Austin and the author of Hip Hop Matters: Politics, Pop Culture, and the Struggle for the Soul of a Movement and Representing: Hip Hop Culture and the Production of Black Cinema.


More About the Author

S. Craig Watkins writes about youth, media, technology, and society. He is an Assoc. Prof. of Radio-TV-Film at the University of Texas at Austin.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Marc Axelrod VINE VOICE on May 28, 2010
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book will get you up to date on what life is like for teens and tweens and twenty somethings. There is an opening survey of the history of technology in the home, starting in the days when most people just had a radio and a phone. But the narrative quickly moves into the present century. You read about the rise of the internet, email, instant messenger services, My Space, and now, Facebook. You learn about why people started moving from My Space to Facebook almost overnight, and how young people see Facebook as primarily an opportunity to enhance and support their current relationships, and not so much as a tool to search for new ones. You also read about how time online is starting to overtake the amount of time in front of the TV. The book seems to make more of this than warranted. Kids still watch hours of TV a day and often multitask by texting and Facebooking and You Tubing and watching Lost all at the same time.

You also read about the online gaming world. This medium, more than any other, makes it easy to create for yourself an alternate universe where people often create alternative characters for themselves and chat online with their gaming comrades.

There is also an interesting chapter about the idea of being addicted to the internet. The APA is not convinced at this time that internet use is an addiction, but apparently many young people feel that it is, and it is a problem in South Korea where PC Bangs command many hours of attention. Some people also report playing online games 8-12 hours a day.

There is a closing chapter about President Obama's huge online support and how much money he raised, and also how supporters created their own online Barack for President rallies.

This is a good book that should be read within the next year before it becomes out of date.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Mari D. Gonzalez on September 2, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I've read five books so far for my graduate school research and the most substantial ones are Wikinomics and The Young and The Digital which is a more scholar and complete study yet easy and fun to read.
Disappointing books on this topic are:
1. The Cluetrain Manifesto which misleadingly is rated 4.5 stars. However, you can buy it new for 38 cents (that should have given me a clue).
2. Here Comes Everybody. It gets off the topic and after reading Wikinomics you don't really need to read this book.
3. "Groundswell" which is full of unnecessary details. The essence of it is about 30 pages. The rest are case studies and I'm not sure how they hold true today.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Jamie Justus on June 7, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I found this book to be engaging to read and well-balanced in how it evaluated the digital patterns of young adults and teens. In the past year, I have been researching "Internet Addiction" and so much of the writing and research feels very sensationalized. In this book, I got the opportunity to look at how young adults engage with technology and understand the patterns as part of the culture and generation, and this came across as more informational and illuminating than judgmental and pathological. It also helped that the author included so many descriptions from young adults.
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