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The Young Hegelians Paperback – May 1, 1997


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 429 pages
  • Publisher: Humanity Books (May 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 157392346X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1573923460
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,167,921 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"There have been book-length studies of the Young Hegelians as a whole and also several studies devoted to individual members. Now Lawrence Stepelevich has produced the first anthology of their writings available in English, and it is excellent. Some of the extracts are here in English for the first time, the editorial comment is short and to the point, and the whole is long enough to give a substantial impression of the various writers from Strauss and Cieszkowski to Stirner and Schmidt."

—Ethics

Language Notes

Text: English, German (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By "treestamp" on June 8, 2003
Format: Paperback
Nearly every aspect of Western culture in 20th century was dominated by "isms": humanism, atheism, communism, socialism, anarchism, egoism, nihilism, materialism, serialism, surrealism, existentialism, abstractionism, cubism, revisionism, deconstructionism, minimalism, globalism...just to name a few. Just about any 20th century "isms" you can think of relating to philosophy, culture, theology, religion, literature, visual art, even music and architecture, is most likely related somehow to the Young Hegelians of the mid to late 19th century. The Young Hegelians were not just a school of thought or a group of devoted followers: they were an intellectual tour de force and collective cultural catalyst.
The Young Hegelians sought to bring Hegel's philosophy to the world through their own critiques, revisions and interpretations. Individually, they were a diverse group whose interests spanned philosophy, politics, philology, religion, history and aesthetics, and they were as prone to disagree with their intellectual godfather Hegel as among themselves. Their influence was expansive, despite the fact that in a short time they managed to dismantled themselves as an intellectual collective.
Because of their dialogue with the then nascent field of psychology and their interest in society and culture, Young Hegelians' thought helped pave the development of sociology and anthropology as scientific disciplines. Their convictions also changed the face of Western politics in an astonishing short time, including the more notorious examples of the Leninist revolution and the Third Reich. Contemporary methodologies in the studies of theology, comparative religion, semantics and textual analysis are too their direct descendents.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Sylveste on April 6, 2000
Format: Paperback
I've only read the Strauss, Feuerbach, and Marx portions of this book, so this review is not fully representative. However, I have to say that the ideas presented by these authors are absolutely fascinating. They really make you rethink your religious beliefs. However, Nietzsche was right, these guys could not write! Someone needed to tell them that the complexity of the language does not have to reflect the complexity of the subject matter. Still, it is worth slogging through to get at the ideas.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Steiner VINE VOICE on April 18, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This excellent volume, edited by Stepelevich, anthologizes the key figures of the left Hegelian movement. There are essential passages here from all the essential-and perhaps some of the inessential-critics of idealism, including Feuerbach, Bauer, Ruge, Marx, Engels, Stirner, Schmidt, Strauss, and others. This constellation of figures marks nothing less than the birth of modern political theory. Marx' Contribution to the Critique of Hegel's Philosophy of Right emerges as the seminal work on ideology and its inadequacy. Stepelevich also includes helpful introductions to each figure.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Bruce P. Barten on October 18, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I have tried to believe in a European intelligentsia that knew what was wrong with current governments, and what I found had a wealth of ideas that turned into convolutions and not solutions. Anything I could say about the pages of this book would be as ironic as the college anthology The Politics of Irony: Essays in Self-Betrayal. This morning I looked up Kant in the index to see how Kant became important in political economy for the generation that became active thinkers after the death of Hegel in 1831. David Friedrich Strauss wrote about religion like someone who had discovered that the law could never be literal. Whatever the law actually says, judges are to figure out a meaning that only applies in particular situations with plenty of obiter dicta for other times and places. For Kant, Jesus Christ was an event at a particular time and place that only formed the nature of Christianity in the mind of the Apostle Paul becaue of a form of reasoning that could be related to the moral world order. Having a religion for every day life which was a duty of morality was far more important for Kant than any doctrine that could be given a religious interpretation.

Arnold Ruge picked Kant as a thinker who was aware of much more than he would be allowed to say, like Leo Strauss trying to figure out Persecution and the Art of Writing.
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