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The Young Heidegger: Rumor of the Hidden King (Studies in Continental Thought) Hardcover – November 22, 1994

3 customer reviews
ISBN-13: 978-0253362025 ISBN-10: 0253362024 Edition: 1st

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Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

Van Buren (philosophy, Fordham) presents a clear and cogent argument for the theory that Martin Heidegger's mature thought, epitomized in Being and Time, actually was a return to his youthful theory and concerns. Van Buren relies and expounds upon the learning and development of such recognized students and explicators of Heidegger as Georg Gadamer, William Richardson, and Michael Zimmerman to advance his presentation of Heidegger's experiences with religious exploration, professional productivity, and the Nazi era. The text at hand should prove a useful guide to students, a provocative resource for future scholars, and an approachable inquiry for informed general readers. Van Buren's ability to present a rounded discussion while using Heidegger's own technical vocabulary is highly commendable.
Francisca Goldsmith, Berkeley P.L., Cal.
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"... a readable, interesting, and first-rate book." John D. Caputo "... a major contribution to Heidegger scholarship ..." Journal of the History of Behavioral Sciences "Van Buren's portrayal of these formative years is striking and vital to all future Heidegger scholarship." Christian Century "Van Buren presents a clear and cogent argument for the theory that Martin Heidegger's mature thought, epitomized in Being and Time, actually was a return to his youthful theory and concerns... Van Buren's ability to present a rounded discussion while using Heidegger's own technical vocabulary is highly commendable." Library Journal " ... here at last is a work on the philosopher that is of fundamental philosophical-historical import. Van Buren's book is both interesting and well written ..." Choice
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Product Details

  • Series: Studies in Continental Thought
  • Hardcover: 448 pages
  • Publisher: Indiana University Press; 1st edition (November 22, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0253362024
  • ISBN-13: 978-0253362025
  • Product Dimensions: 6.1 x 1.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #989,077 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By C Hill on August 27, 2008
Format: Hardcover
This work I assume is the published book version of Van Buren's (VB) doctoral dissertation by the same title- and it shows. It's hyperresearched and overquoted, tough-going, brutally tedious, repetitive as if the author/PhD candidate set himself a goal to write a certain number of pages no matter what. The first part is introductory with the worst first chapter imaginable: a cheap and nasty attack on Heidegger- the very thinker on whom the author will spend the next 400 pages writing. It attacks Heidegger on all fronts using Derridaean cheap-shots among other things. He joins Kisiel and Sheehan in insulting the executors of Heidegger's will (his family) for...executing Heidegger's will! And not that of Kisiel, that is, for keeping the editions of the opus as Heidegger requested them, of his last hand, instead of opening up the manuscripts to Americans scholars to fabricate their own "critical edition." As if there's some dirty secret to be found or if somehow a radicaly different Heidegger would emerge. VB also finds it reprehensible that Heidegger didn't think highly of his work as a student so much so that he suppressed it and made it disappear. I don't know about VB, but I would not want my students papers to be included in any publication either if I were an old world-renowned philosopher.

While this chapter makes one want to put the book down once and for all, if one continues to chapter two, one finds an outstanding summary of Heidegger's work. One wonders whether chapter one was introduced to please an editor, a professor perhaps, a prospective employer, or the author is trying to align himself with a certain school of interpretation. Oddly enough, the rest of the book for the the most part is sober and straightforward scholarship, without the hysterical hatred.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By P. Soen on February 26, 2006
Format: Hardcover
John Van Buren proposes a relatively straightforward thesis: the later works of Heidegger are a revisiting of themes that he began as a young teacher at Marburg. His thesis enables him to closely examine Heidegger before his phenomenological masterpiece Being and Time and the events that preceded that publication. In the spirit of the phenomenological project, he is able to bracket and set aside the "dangerous" Heidegger for the purpose of understanding his thinking before it was polluted by his Nazi reputation.

So what do we get to see? Well, Van Buren explicates Heidegger's student years as a seminarian training to become a Jesuit, but then is later advised to refrain from such training, due to literal trouble with his heart. And then we get to see, Heidegger the theological student attempting to remain with in the walls of the church both in his thinking and faith. It is during his years as a theology student that Heidegger encounters Brentano's work on the different senses of 'being' found within the work of Aristotle. This begins a lifelong obsession for Heidegger. After this, we get to see a young Heidegger that frees himself from the tradition and ceremony of the Catholic Church, who then goes on to become an "un-dogmatic Protestant."

Eventually, we get to see in fascinating detail, the young Heidegger wrestle the Pauline concept of time as it was understood by Augustine and also the Lutheran concept of Reformation. Van Buren proposes that the fundamental existential dialect found within Heidegger's life is one that starts in theology and ends with ontology. Ultimately, the ones that free him from theology are Luther and Eckhardt.
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By John D. Reek on February 3, 2015
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Profoundly insightful
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