Qty:1
  • List Price: $14.00
  • Save: $4.96 (35%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 13 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Minor signs of wear. Eligible for FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping. Amazon Customer Service 24/7 with Delivery Tracking. Receive Your Item in 3-5 Business Days!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

The Zen Way to Martial Arts: A Japanese Master Reveals the Secrets of the Samurai (Compass) Paperback – September 15, 1992


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$9.04
$2.46 $0.01
Board book
"Please retry"
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

The Zen Way to Martial Arts: A Japanese Master Reveals the Secrets of the Samurai (Compass) + Zen in the Martial Arts + Be Like Water: Practical Wisdom from the Martial Arts
Price for all three: $26.18

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Year-End Kindle Daily Deals
Load your library with great books for $2.99 or less each, today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Series: Compass
  • Paperback: 128 pages
  • Publisher: Penguin Books (September 15, 1992)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0140193448
  • ISBN-13: 978-0140193442
  • Product Dimensions: 5.1 x 0.4 x 8.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #54,086 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Language Notes

Text: English, French (translation) --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

George Leonard has introduced LET to more than 50,000 people in the United States and abroad. He is the author of a number of books on human possibilities and social change, including Mastery (Plume 1992), and lives in San Francisco, California.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
12
4 star
6
3 star
4
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 22 customer reviews
These sections were easy to read and grasp and the personality of the author shines through.
Spider Monkey
This book serves as great reminder to those of us in the martial arts who sometimes allow our ego to interfere with our life's mission.
ltoth@trail.com or Al Toth
There is much, much more to the martial arts than what is taught in the majority of today's politically correct, sports focused dojos.
Bohdi Sanders, Ph.D.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Grant Griffith on October 10, 2001
Format: Paperback
Hi, my name is Grant Griffith you can email me at grifbox@hotmail.com,
This book by Taisen Deshimaru gives the reader a framework to begin zen meditation and ultimately produce spontaneous 'non-thinking' actions in the martial arts. True to the title, the book shows the link between zen and the martial arts. This is done with an interesting mix of interviews, short stories and anecdotes.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on December 26, 2007
Format: Paperback
A true master, the zen monk Deshimaru in approximately 100 pages is capable elaborating on the differences between the practice of martial sport and martial art. That these ideas can take a full lifetime to explore make this a classical book on the subject.

A truly masterful achievement, as this book has synthesized for me what has taken great lengths to learn from multiple sources and has also introduced many abstract concepts into terms that a non-Zen practicing Budoka can understand. Unlike many other books approaching this subject, you need not become a "Japanophile" or create a super-ego to relate.

This book is naturally compatible with genuine materials on the martial mindset from Tukuan Soho, Miyamoto Musashi and Morihei Ueshiba, true masters who also wrote short but deeply meaningful books on the subject of martial practice. So this book becomes an organic extension of these other masterpieces: The book of 5 rings (Musashi Miyamoto), The Unfettered Mind (Tukuan Soho) and The Art of Peace (Ueshiba). All highly recommended.

The martial mindset has nothing to do with sports-minded competition. Modern "martial arts" are most of the time a form of sanctioned violence taught to self-appointed vigilante's. When such idiots confront a situation where emotional breakdowns occur due to overwhelming odds or unfamiliar setups, the results are enlightenment the hard way!

The distinction evident from this book is the understanding that when the practice of martial art encompasses a realistic acceptance of life or death with a conditioned acceptance of death through the practice of zen, true courage becomes possible.

Other concepts elaborated are the elusive subject of ki and the practical method of practicing zen as it relates to breathing.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Mark from Seattle on April 8, 2004
Format: Paperback
If you want to grasp the true essence of Zen and martial arts (traditional martial arts where the emphasis is on life and death and not the juvenile sport that it has become), then this book is an excellent start.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By ltoth@trail.com or Al Toth on September 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book serves as great reminder to those of us in the martial arts who sometimes allow our ego to interfere with our life's mission. Thoughtfully written and communicated. Even those not in the arts would benefit from this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Bruce M. on July 17, 2009
Format: Paperback
This is the THE BOOK for anyone interested in Zen. Period.

I can't stop reading this book. It has been in my personal effects for going on 20 years...rarely more than a few feet from where I sleep. I AM NOT KIDDING.

This is the real deal.

I've read a bunch of books on Zen, and similar philosophical/new agey kind of stuff (you know, Deepak Chopra, et al.) I've read Suzuki (both), I've read Watts, and most of the rest. Most of that stuff is very verbose, or poorly translated, or written by a poor user of English, or otherwise cludgy and difficult to read. Not this book. This book is like a May walk through a garden with butterflies and chirping birds and a light breeze on your face.

Not only is it a "walk in the park" but it is immensely deep too. How the author accomplished that is beyond me...but it is undeniable proof that he is a true master and that whatever he is doing works. See what I mean?

Now, I don't know much about Martial Arts, per se, and this book doesn't teach you diddly about any specific one. In fact, the title is misleading I believe...or maybe not misleading, but I honestly think that it is keeping a great number of readers away from it, which is unfortunate.

So what I'm saying is: don't buy this to learn Karate. Buy this to live life. To do anything.

Every human being on Earth should read this book.

Zen is life itself...every breath, every step, and yes.....each one could be your last. Samurai, or not, we all face the same existence.

I consider this book my personal bible.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Ambrosio Vigolo on June 18, 2001
Format: Paperback
This book gives the reader some nice mind-training and why the mind, body and spirit has to work together to reach perfection within the martial arts and the way of Zen.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Grant Griffith on October 10, 2001
Format: Paperback
....
This book by Taisen Deshimaru gives the reader a framework to begin zen meditation and ultimately produce spontaneous 'non-thinking' actions in the martial arts. True to the title, the book shows the link between zen and the martial arts. This is done with an interesting mix of interviews, short stories and anecdotes.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
`The Zen Way to the Martial Arts' explores some of the links between the practise of Zen and various martial arts from the perspective of a Japanese Zen master. There are numerous similarities in the philosophies and much can be gleaned and applied from either sphere to the improvement of the other. This has some calligraphy dotted throughout the text, as well as some photos of the author. My particular favourite parts of the book were the mondo sections which consist of a conversational question and answer format between the author and some students. These sections were easy to read and grasp and the personality of the author shines through. I heave read other books that have tried to link martial arts and spiritual practises but this is the only one that has succeeded and comes across as credible and authentic. The writing style (surprisingly for a translation) is clear and lucid and the points raised give plenty of food for thought. There is something for all to appreciate in these pages, whether you are a Zen practitioner, martial artist or interested in some of the spiritual ideas of the east and this is worth adding to your bookshelf at some point.

Feel free to check out my blog which can be found on my profile page.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?