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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bloody Kentucky
This book was not written by Sir Winston Churchill but a different author with the same name. I read this book as it was mentioned in my family history as a good description of the frontier in Kentucky around the Revolution. I rarely read novels but this book captured my attention and was a great read. It transported me back to a much tougher time in American history and...
Published on February 4, 2002 by George Bray JR.

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0 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars The book was in very poor condition
I love the book. I had an old copy but had lost it and wanted a used copy to replace. The ad said it was in excellent condition, but when it arrived the cove was warped, the spine was loose from the book and several pages were out.
I complained and the seller did refund my money.
So all's well that ends well.
Published 17 months ago by Brenda H. Murphy


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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bloody Kentucky, February 4, 2002
By 
George Bray JR. (Issaquah, WA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The crossing
This book was not written by Sir Winston Churchill but a different author with the same name. I read this book as it was mentioned in my family history as a good description of the frontier in Kentucky around the Revolution. I rarely read novels but this book captured my attention and was a great read. It transported me back to a much tougher time in American history and in the area where my ancestors were located. It gave life and meaning to the hardships of my ancestors lives.
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20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Crossing into Kentucky, July 8, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: Crossing (Hardcover)
My dad was born in 1921 in the farmlands of Edgar County, Illinois, and the Crossing by Winston Churchill (not the British leader) was his favorite book as a young boy. It is a tale of US western expansion, especially the crossing over the mountains into Kentucky, and much of the story is told through the eyes of a rather wide-eyed young man. I would recommend this book to parents who want to develop a love of history in their children and who want to spend time reading books together -- the rhythm of the author's writing is especially wonderful when read out loud. I would imagine boys would especially love this tale; however, I loved it, also, and I'm about as girlie a girl as you can get!
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars This Winston Churchill was Not Sir Winston S. Churchill, July 2, 1998
By A Customer
This review is from: The crossing
This is an excellent book about frontier days.
There is a common misconception about this book that many (including one other review) commonly fall into. This book was not written by the Brittish Prime Minister Sir Winston S. Churchill but rather by an american authour called winston churchill who was very popular at the turn of the century but who is sadly forgotton today. This other Winston churchil wrote several novels at the turn of the century. The way to tell the two apart is that the future prime minister always used the inital s. as did the early editions of his books. Unfortunetly reprints may not follow this rule.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Crossing, January 21, 2013
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This review is from: The Crossing (Kindle Edition)
This is a wonderful treatment of the history of the time before revolutionary war when the country began it's westward habitation.
The language captures the dialect of the time which brings the reader closer to the events as they unfold.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read book!, June 2, 2012
This review is from: The Crossing (Kindle Edition)
I am not one who normally reads historical fictions. However, I started this book on a whim and I am not sorry that I did. I strongly recommend this book, especially to those who like history and adventure. Five stars, well earned!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Crossing, October 6, 2012
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This review is from: The Crossing (Kindle Edition)
This is a great book. My father gave it to me a long time ago. I have enjoyed reading and re-reading it.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Frontier During the Revolutionary War, January 16, 2012
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This review is from: The Crossing (Kindle Edition)
The story starts right before July 4, 1776. The Battle of Charles Town (Charleston, SC), the Kentucky frontier, friendly Natives and decidedly unfriendly ones, Daniel Boone and Andy Jackson are a few parts of the book. Brave women and children are stars of the story, not on the sidelines. Good for teens on up to great grandparents.
This American author is not to be confused with the British statesman.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars hitorical fiction, March 1, 2013
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This review is from: The Crossing (Kindle Edition)
One of my favorites.
Love this author. Need more like this. Where have the good authors gone
Iwould like more by this author.
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5.0 out of 5 stars This is a book which deserves to be brought out of obscurity so that it can be enjoyed once again by those who appreciate good w, February 17, 2015
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The Crossing by Winston Churchill. No, this is not a novel written by Winston S. Churchill, the British statesman. It is a book by Winston Churchill the American who was a wildly popular author in the late 1800 and early 1900s. The story is told by Davey Rtichie, a young boy born on the then frontier of western North Carolina in the eighteenth century. His father, a mysterious frontiersman, on the eve of the American Revolution, leaves Davey in Charleston with the wealthy Temple family while he goes away to fight Indians. The Temples, except for Nick, a boy
Davey's own age, pay little attention to him, and when he receives the news of his father's death, he runs away trying to get to the paradise of Kentucky of which he and his father had dreamed. On the way he joins Tom and Polly McChesney and they travel together through the Cumberland gap to the promised land where they establish a home. It is not a peaceful place however, because the Indian tribes have been stirred up by British General Hamilton who pays them for the scalps they bring him. As the war winds on, the frontiersman under Colonel George Rogers Clark undertake an impossible campaign to carry the war to Hamilton's doorstep. Davey is enlisted as a drummer boy and accompanies the small army through many hardships until they have actually accomplished the task. The second part of the book deals with Davey as an adult. Through a strange meeting he learns that he is related to the Temples of Charleston and the boy Nick is his cousin. After a three-year stay in Virginia studying law, the newly qualified Davy is reunited with Nick, now a wild young man. When Davy is sent on an information gathering mission down the Mississippi River to New Orleans Nick accompanies him, but a chance encounter with the past again separates the two young men, and they do not meet until some years later when Nick has become involved in a madcap venture by some Kentuckians to invade and capture New Orleans for the United States. Once again, Davey travels downriver to rescue Nick. This is a book which deserves to be brought out of obscurity so that it can be enjoyed once again by those who appreciate good writing and splendid storytelling. Indeed, it can still be enjoyed by anyone from twelve to eighty as a rousing good tale of Kentucky's early settlement, Clark's conquest of the Northwest Territory, and of Louisiana under the rule of Spain.
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3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Historical novel of Kentucky, the Old Northwest, and New Orleans, March 25, 2006
By 
Bomojaz (South Central PA, USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: The Crossing (Hardcover)
THE CROSSING was American novelist Winston Churchill's third and last historical novel, and deals mainly with the settlement of Kentucky and the winning of the Old Northwest by George Rogers Clark. Davy Ritchie is the main character; he runs away from his uncaring aunt (who had been raising him since his mother's death) and in the Virginia mountains joins up with the Ripleys on their way to Kentucky over the Wilderness Trail. With Indian troubles brewing in the Ohio/Illinois territory thanks to British agitation (the year is 1778), George Rogers Clark leads an expedition there to destroy the British forts; Davy goes along as drummer boy. Part 1 of the book, the best part, ends with Clark's victory at Vincennes.

Unfortunately, the book continues and the story deteriorates. Many years later, Davy gets involved in the Wilkinson plot - a plan to seize control of the Spanish lands in Louisiana and set up a separate country (Davy is opposed to it). He goes to New Orleans, falls in love with an aristocratic woman, Helene, converts her to Federalism, and brings her back to Kentucky.

As in his earlier two historical novels, the best things in this book are the historical incidents - Churchill had researched thoroughly before writing and was careful to get the historical details correct. The chief fault is likewise the same as in the past: his inability to draw believable, true-to-life characters; they are cardboard figures, all of a type. Also the plot is too drawn out; the book is actually two or three novels all clumped into one. The book was published at the tail end of an historical fiction craze that had influenced the public's reading preferences over the last ten years or so, and the book was not as popular as his earlier books. Churchill had planned two additional historical novels for his series, but never wrote them. Part 1 (The Borderland) of the book can still give much pleasure to the reader today, though much of the rest is lost to stiff characterization and too much incident. It's a shame Churchill didn't write straight history - it's definitely his strong suit.
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The crossing
The crossing by Winston Churchill (Paperback - August 30, 2010)
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