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The game: My 40 years in tennis Hardcover – January 1, 1979


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 318 pages
  • Publisher: Putnam (1979)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0399123369
  • ISBN-13: 978-0399123368
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,246,224 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By P. H. on September 16, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Before buying this book, I recall doing a search on the web and coming across an interesting topic on a tennis message board. It talked about Jack Kramer and his thoughts and opinions, especially in regards to this book. The premise of many people's ideas was that his rankings of the best players of all time were directly influenced by who he was friends with. Since I know a decent amount of tennis history (not claiming to be a guru or anything), I found this fascinating, and it made me want to read the book. After reading the book, it makes sense. He praises Bobby Riggs to the high heavens and ranks him as being a better player than Pancho Gonzales (most old-school tennis fans' pick for the best player ever), but he was very close friends with Riggs. He says that Ted Schroeder had very poor groundstrokes and had to rush the net because that was the only way he could win (although he does praise his competitive spirit), yet he also ranks Schroder, another good buddy, among the best. Pancho Segura? Same thing. I'm not pulling the friends thing out of thin air, either - Kramer says it himself in the book.

I'll get to it in a second why this matters - work with me here. One of the things that I generally tend to hate about older athletes is the lack of respect for the athletes that follow their generations - it's what I like to call the "back in my day" syndrome. It strikes me as being especially bad in the core American sports (baseball, basketball, football), but you get it in most sports, I would think. And that's especially on display here - Kramer repeatedly praises the players that played a bit before and especially during his time, but is a bit lukewarm about the successive generations.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By WC_Wingfield on November 14, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Well, I could just leave it at: No tennislibrary (or for that matter shelf) should be without this classic! Everything what Mr Deford writes (or cowrites) turns into gold. And Mr Kramers story is worth telling. In the center of the game, Mr kramer allows himself to be blunt about everything and everyone. What happened in the professional tennis circuit, what happened when finally tennis went open. Frank kramer was there en tells about it. And if you love to compare tennis-players, Kramer gives his well funded apionion about who was the best. I loved it!
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By Gene Cisco on November 4, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
As a Kramer Kid(helped him with a tennis clinic)and player, I found this to be a very informative biography about this iconic promoter/player tennis great who thought of the game as more than a racket. Of tennis biographies go, I waited to the last to read his because I have an earlier work of his devoted to the technical strokes alone. I don't think he was being unrealistic in his determinations about the tennis greats of his time. His fantasy listing of champions since 1939 to 1968, where he makes corrections to the empty periods of Wimbledon and Forest Hills was most interesting. Although he gives the nod to Don Budge, he also indirectly gives credence to his heir-apparent, Pancho Gonzales, in the years from 1951 to 1968 if you read between the lines. He informs the public about the controversies in bringing professional tennis to the Open Era while revealing previous attempts to enlarge tennis popularity in the 50s, with doubles play for instance. Ken Rosewall attempts to set the same record straight(and a reviewer) about his dominance of the post-Kramer era too in his biography "Twenty Years at the Top," where he continuously contradicts himself every other page or so with more Gonzales' accomplishments.

Let me address why there is little praise for the two-handed fellas: Borg, Connors, Evert or others: because they can be all summed up in the play of Pancho Segura. Why? It was considered 'unorthodox' to play two-handed. It made you a slower player with a shorter competitive lifespan. More importantly, it takes exceptional eye-hand coordination to play. What distinguishes Segura from other two-handed practitioners today is the fact that he was also a great tactician. Segura learned quickly on the tour how to defend the attackers(Kramer, Gonzales, Sedgman, Hoad).
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful By leetb on July 23, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a very informative book about the inside workings of tennis. Although it was written years ago,it reads as fresh as today. I was also extremely pleased with my Amazon service. The book came earlier than expected,and very neatly wrapped.
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