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The goth Bible: A Compendium for the Darkly Inclined Paperback – September 23, 2004


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The goth Bible: A Compendium for the Darkly Inclined + Gothic Charm School: An Essential Guide for Goths and Those Who Love Them + Encyclopedia Gothica
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; First Edition edition (September 23, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312306962
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312306960
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.5 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #805,303 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

If spilling into the mainstream betokens a subculture losing its allure, Kilpatrick's cute compendium may be sounding the death knell for goth. Kilpatrick plucked "ninety-five anonymous goths" off the Net to answer 125 questions and thereby serve as "The [cross] Section" responsible for the findings in a book that caused--"fortunately for me," she notes--"a bidding war . . . among several publishers." Her informants often sent photographs, many of which accompany snippets of their responses in some of the book's dandy marginalia. Although very much about and for contemporary embracers of the goth lifestyle, this is a user-friendly tome that briefly addresses the historical, big-g Goths, drawing parallels and illuminating influences on today's small-g goths. Not that it's all serious historical analysis. Among the delicious contemporary topics covered are "Cemetery Picnics and Other Diversions," "Sex and the Single goth," and "Existential Questions for goth Bar-and-club Owners." Summarizes Kilpatrick, "Nobody knows what modern goth is about, but the simplest truth is this: Goth is a state of mind." Mike Tribby
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

About the Author

Bestselling author Nancy Kilpatrick has published 14 novels, over 125 short stories, and has edited 8 anthologies. Her series include The Darker Passions, the Power of the Blood and As One Dead. Winner of the Arthur Ellis Award for best mystery story, her work of horror has also been a Bram Stoker Aurora Award finalist many times. For over 25 years, Nancy has been involved with the goth scene. She and her black cat Bella make their home in Montreal.

More About the Author

Hi there! I'm Nancy Kilpatrick and I write and edit, mainly in the dark fantasy and horror fields, but I've also written fantasy, mystery stories, erotica, and one science fiction story! I've published 18 novels, about 200 short stories, 5 collections of stories, a few issues of a comic book series, 1 non-fiction book and many non-fiction articles articles, and I've also edited 13 anthologies. I write under my own name, Nancy Kilpatrick, and also two pen names, Amarantha Knight and Desiree Knight.

Two recent titles are:

VAMPYRIC VARIATIONS, a collection of 7 vampire stories and 3 novellas, with an introduction by the wonderful writer Tanith Lee. ***WINNER OF THE SILVER FOREWORD REVIEWS BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARD (horror catagory)***

DANSE MACABRE: CLOSE ENCOUNTERS WITH THE REAPER, an anthology I edited with stories by Brian Lumley, Tanith Lee, Tom Piccirilli, Nancy Holder, Brian Hodge, Lisa Morton, Lucy Taylor and many others. The subject matter of these fascinating stories is based on Medieval artwork that interests me. I wanted to see if visual art could be turned into literature, and it can be! You can visit the dansemacabreanthology dot com page to see the contributors and read reviews and interviews. ***WINNER OF THE PARIS BOOK FESTIVAL AWARD FOR BEST ANTHOLOGY***

If you would like more information, you can check out my website: nancykilpatrick dot com. You can also join me on Facebook--please do!

Customer Reviews

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This book is great, filled with valuable and interesting information, no Goth should be without.
The Ugly Beauty Queen
Don't get me wrong, it sounds like i'm complaining too much, but this is a great informational book that everyone should read.
David van Sise
To put it simply, this book is just a collection of opinions formatted as though they were fact.
J. Mitchell

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 37 people found the following review helpful By mick mercer on November 9, 2004
Format: Paperback
This is actually the very first charming Goth book. We have had a few Goth epics in recent years, from my Net-based tome, to Paul Hodkinson's academic study, Gavin Baddeley coming from a Metal perspective, and Dave Thompson rummaging through the eighties. What is unusual here is that Nancy Kilpatrick hasn't any ego-driven agenda, and has actively sought out Goth opinions to decorate each chapter with. 95 Goths answered 125 questions each to form an alternative spine to this work and it makes it a very different book to the rest. Nancy is best known as a Horror writer but she is a Goth, and clearly delighted to be writing the book, as she also wants this book to help others understand Goth.

You get serious contributions on sex/relationships/Fetish/marriage/Goth children/Corporate Goth/Goth homes, Art and Literature (Old and New), and it ends with a chapter on the Future, even if that felt a little skimpy.

Basically, she goes through things that effect Goth life, from clothes to accoutrements, to relationships, religion, cemeteries, architecture, music and all the expected areas, with quotes and photos from her Goths interviews draping pages like curtains, as their comments go down the outer columns to most spreads. Those interviewed within the chapter text tend to be business-related individuals pertinent to the topic in question. So, in the Fashion or Lifestyle sections you have many a Goth contribution, but also meet Morpheus of Siren, R. Hunter Gough of `Gother Than Thou', Fred H.
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34 of 39 people found the following review helpful By djvampira on August 3, 2005
Format: Paperback
This is basically a book of opinions on what goth is and what goth isn't. There are a lot of basic facts about different aspects of the subculture, but nothing really new that hasn't been done before by other authors.

I would like to state that the people calling others 'poseur' in this review section don't have a clue about the subculture. It was originally about being yourself, but according to them you have to be a sheep. Please don't think that all people into the subculture are immature morons.
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18 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Ginny Wilkes on June 18, 2005
Format: Paperback
I borrowed this book from a friend's mother and had it finished in less than an hour. It was so interesting I couldn't put it down. The book didn't even have to leave their house. Such a great read. I only wish that those people who believe all goths are suicidal Satanists would read it. Even though I don't go for the whole labling people thing, I must say that this was enlightening and not at all what I thought it would be when it was insisted I read it.
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17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Wickerman on December 27, 2004
Format: Paperback
I Only wish that it was bigger. More More More. I enjoyed it, being a 30-something goth who has seen and done it all at some point. But still, it is nice to know that there are other people out there that have the same sense of goth humor and choose to live that beautiful and misunderstood lifestyle. Some of it is laughable, some is beautiful, nonetheless several times throughout the book I was reminded of how and why I "became goth" pardon the cliche'...and I reminisced about the wonderful music and people I knew during certain periods of my punk/goth/mod/new-wave/new romantic/artrockbeatnikpagan phases. I wish Nancy Kilpatrick, Voltaire (who wrote the "Oh My Goth" comics and has several cds) and Brandon Neil Ragan (who wrote the gothic cult classic "Grey Garden") would all get together and write the official "GOTH-UMENTARY". They seem like they could pull off the ultimate gothic coffee table book. Anyway, thanks for the cool book
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By David van Sise on October 19, 2004
Format: Paperback
For the most part, the real important part of this book has got to be the first two chapters. I say this because it overly stresses the most mportant part of the culture. That is, that gothic is what is on the inside, and though it's always a good idea to express ones self on the outside, it is not necessary. The rest of the book just shows things that goths tend to do, and are interested in. Other helpfull things are the mention of gothic artists and writers.

One of the few problems, though, was the unmention of the first gothic novel, either it's there and i missed it or it isn't there, but the mention of Horace Walpole should have been there.

One other problem was that some of the things mentiond about goths made it sound that in order to feel gothic there were things you must buy. Sometimes i thought that, that was what it looked like, but wasn't actually what was said. I believe that some of the book was worded in a way that can cause confusion for those who don't normally know much about it.

One last thing, was that i wished there would have been a spot about those that are gothic and those who actively particapate in the scene. In other words those who aren't into clubs as oppossed

to those who are.

Don't get me wrong, it sounds like i'm complaining too much, but this is a great informational book that everyone should read.
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16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By J. Mitchell on February 10, 2006
Format: Paperback
To put it simply, this book is just a collection of opinions formatted as though they were fact. The book's "facts," can easily be supported, or disputed. Whether or not the book is actually goth, well, that largely depends on what you think goth is. In the end, no matter what you think goth is, this book is boring. Like a textbook, boring. It's written flatly and boringly. It's neither entertaining nor enlightening. I've enjoyed many history books and books about subculture, but as I said, this book is neither fun to read nor informative. Bottom line: no matter what you think goth is, this book is a bore. If you must have it, you might like it. For a far superior book about the goth subculture, I'd highly suggest Voltaire's "What Is Goth?"
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