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The guide for the perplexed Paperback – August 24, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 484 pages
  • Publisher: Nabu Press (August 24, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1177683164
  • ISBN-13: 978-1177683166
  • Product Dimensions: 9.7 x 7.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,363,842 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

About the Author:

"Moses Maimonides (March 28, 1138 Cordoba, Spain - December 13, 1204 Fostat, Egypt), was a rabbi, physician, and philosopher in Andalusia, Morocco and Egypt during the Middle Ages. He was one of the various medieval Jewish philosophers who also influenced the non-Jewish world. Although his copious works on Jewish law and ethics were initially met with opposition during his lifetime, he was posthumously acknowledged to be one of the foremost rabbinical arbiters and philosophers in Jewish history. Today, his works and his views are considered a cornerstone of Jewish thought and study." (Quote from wikipedia.org) --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

The creators should have tripled the size of this book and put it out in two volumes.
Jasek
Words are defined, and also analyzed in an etymological way, which is really more mystical than scientific, but we're talking Torah.
Rivkah Maccaby
It is easily understandable, although it lacks the nuances of the original which is in Hebrew.
Ben.tley

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

82 of 86 people found the following review helpful By Rivkah Maccaby on November 28, 2001
Format: Paperback
I'm going to try to separate my critique of the text as it is presented, and Maimonides work.
The typeface used here is awfully small, and crammed onto the pages with a crowbar, it seems. The margins must be measured with a micrometer. I suppose the publishers were determined to get the thing into one volume, but this book is really pretty slender; I don't see why it couldn't be larger to accommodate larger print, with more white space, so the words aren't crammed together like passengers in steerage.
The translation is dated, and takes some getting used to, if you haven't had a lot of exposure to late Victorian English, the language may be off-putting. I happen to have a degree in English literature, and have read many styles extensively, and barely notice how dated the language was. There are other translations, but Freidlander, in this translation is very cautious in keeping his words consistent. This is important, because a large part of Guide for the Perplexed is defining Biblical terms.
The Guide for the Perplexed is a brilliant work. Maimonides is my nomination for "most important post-Talmudic scholar."
The Guide is not a simple work; Maimonides does not spell things out; he doesn't give succinct answers to ages old questions. One doesn't go to this book, look up "Cain," and say, "Ah, there's where he got his wife."
This is a book to aid the reader in becoming a better scholar. Where Maimonides does not give answers, he presents the tools that may assist the reader in studying the Torah, and coming up with his (or her!) own answers.
Words are defined, and also analyzed in an etymological way, which is really more mystical than scientific, but we're talking Torah.
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66 of 71 people found the following review helpful By R. J. Corbett on January 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
Maimonides' Guide is a masterwork of philosophic interest to Jews and non-Jews interested in the problem posed by philosophy to revealed religion, but Friedlander's translation is not the way to approach it. Besides removing the ambiguity of Maimonides' title by rendering it "The Guide *for* the Perplexed", he translates technical Rabbanic hermaneutical terms into awkward and sometimes inappropriate Latin 'equivilants'. Anyone who needs such translation won't be able to understand Maimonides' thought anyway, steeped in Rabbinics as it is; anyone looking to learn something of the Guide will be unable to do so with this translation. Shlomo Pines' translation is universally considered superior; be sure to get both volumes.
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43 of 46 people found the following review helpful By Avid reader on July 1, 2001
Format: Paperback
This turn-of-the- (20th) century tranlation from the Arabic has been absolutely superceded by the Pines-Strauss University of Chicago edition. No one really interested in studying Maimonides can afford to use this translation.Maimonides in his introduction makes it clear just how careful he was in his choice of words, so someone who has to read the book in translation cannot afford to save a few bucks and buy a flawed version
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Frikle on February 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
This has become one of my favourite non-fiction books. The Rambam (Maimonides) is an absolute giant of learning and explanations. In this volume, he presents many of the philosophical sides of Judaism which are rarely encountered.
The text is divided into 3 books.
The first book starts with discussing the use of homonyms in the Bible, especially in relation to describing God. The thesis that emerges is that it is only superficially that the Bible describes God as corporeal but the real doctrine precludes corporeality. The second topic discussed is the nature of esoteric study in Judaism and why it should only be taught in a restricted manner. The third topic is where Rambam protests against people using positive attributes to describe God and tries to prove that God is beyond such attributes. Then, he describes the Kalam argument (an Islamic school of thought that tried to prove the existence of God amongst other things) and points out his view of the flaws in it.
The second book starts with a discussion of Aristotelian philosophy in terms of cosmology and metaphysics and compares that with Judaism, especially the mystical tradition. Rambam then gives his own view of the world structure which is at times very amusing in terms of what we know of science but still very interesting. Then, he describes the nature of prophecy and what exactly it meant to be a Biblical prophet.
The third book opens with a hinted exposition of mystical passages in the Bible, such as Ezekiel's Chariot (Ezek Chap 1 and others). Then, he talks about God and the problem of Evil as well as providence. Finally, he describes the perfect worship of God as well as the purpose of most of the major commandments in the Torah.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Jasek on December 7, 2000
Format: Paperback
I gave it 5 stars, because it is a great piece of work - essential in Jewish studies - in its full, unabridged version. In keeping the price of the book low, the creators of the work left the readers a couple of problems. One, the type is way too small. Two, aside from the introduction, there are no notes or commentary, leaving the unexperienced reader with little resources for such an extremely intricate work. The creators should have tripled the size of this book and put it out in two volumes. I, and I'm sure many others, would have had no problem paying triple for it, if that were the case, for it is a work that is well worth the price. But that does not diminish its current greatness.
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