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The invisible college: What a group of scientists has discovered about UFO influences on the human race Hardcover – January 1, 1975


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 216 pages
  • Publisher: Dutton; 1st edition (1975)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0525134700
  • ISBN-13: 978-0525134701
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,074,086 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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More About the Author

Jacques VALLEE holds a master's degree in astrophysics from France and a PhD in computer science from Northwestern University, where he served as an associate of Dr. J. Allen Hynek. He is the author of several books about high technology and unidentified phenomena, a subject that first attracted his attention as an astronomer in Paris. While analyzing observations from many parts of the world, Jacques became intrigued by the similarities in patterns between moderrn sightings and historical reports of encounters with flying objects and their occupants in every culture. The result was the seminal book Passport to Magonia, published in 1969.

After a career as an information scientist with Stanford Research Institute and the Institute for the Future, where he served as a principal investigator for the groupware project on the Arpanet, the prototype of the Internet, Jacques Vallée co-founded a venture capital firm in Silicon Valley. He lives in San Francisco.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Published in 1975, `The Invisible College: What a Group of Scientists has Discovered About UFO Influences on the Human Race' (the full title) was Jacques Vallee's fourth work on the puzzling UFO/contactee phenomena. Here he first put forward his idea that these phenomena were some kind of `control system' on human consciousness. Vallee is highly intelligent, his ideas are often interesting and he has a reputation for thinking out-of-the-box (he refers to himself as "a heretic among heretics"), but whether he ultimately offers any meaningful answers to this persistent set of phenomena is debatable. Many read Vallee's books and find his ideas hard to accept simply because they do not explain the evidence nor offer any credible, sustainable hypothesis.

The name `The Invisible College' was first used in the 1500s by early rationalist scientists who co-operated covertly to avoid the attentions of the Church, the then-controlling ideology, and (Vallee tells us) was resurrected by late 20th century scientists again confronted by a similar controlling ideology: that UFO and related phenomena do not exist and deserve no consideration. This latter-day Invisible College reportedly shared data and ideas about the UFO phenomenon in secret in order not to jeopardise their careers in the prevailing restrictive ideological climate. Where once people were burned at the stake, now they are merely ridiculed and ostracised for daring to be rational and open-minded.

The book's long title however is slightly misleading, as the content is not really about `what a group of scientists has discovered about UFO influences on the human race' but, rather, what Jacques Vallee personally thought about this subject in 1975.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By bhangonoveloctresidom on March 27, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Vallee's precious contribution to UFO research is his agnosticism and ability to see a third option: UFO's may not be physical "aliens", but they may also defy classification as pure psychological anomalies. So what are they? Vallee presents a fresh possibility.
The only reason I don't give The Invisible College 5 stars is the excess number of UFO cases documented. Granted, they may have been more necessary in 1975, when the book was published, but I doubt it. Most of us had been indoctrinated into the typical variations of UFOlogy by 1960 - but Vallee does retell the cases with clarity and intelligence.
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Format: Paperback
Published in 1975, `The Invisible College: What a Group of Scientists has Discovered About UFO Influences on the Human Race' (the full title) was Jacques Vallee's fourth work on the puzzling UFO/contactee phenomena. Here he first put forward his idea that these phenomena were some kind of `control system' on human consciousness. Vallee is highly intelligent, his ideas are often interesting and he has a reputation for thinking out-of-the-box (he refers to himself as "a heretic among heretics"), but whether he ultimately offers any meaningful answers to this persistent set of phenomena is debatable. Many read Vallee's books and find his ideas hard to accept simply because they do not explain the evidence nor offer any credible, sustainable hypothesis.

The name `The Invisible College' was first used in the 1500s by early rationalist scientists who co-operated covertly to avoid the attentions of the Church, the then-controlling ideology, and (Vallee tells us) was resurrected by late 20th century scientists again confronted by a similar controlling ideology: that UFO and related phenomena do not exist and deserve no consideration. This latter-day Invisible College reportedly shared data and ideas about the UFO phenomenon in secret in order not to jeopardise their careers in the prevailing restrictive ideological climate. Where once people were burned at the stake, now they are merely ridiculed and ostracised for daring to be rational and open-minded.

The book's long title however is slightly misleading, as the content is not really about `what a group of scientists has discovered about UFO influences on the human race' but, rather, what Jacques Vallee personally thought about this subject in 1975.
Read more ›
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 14, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Jacques Vallée made a synthesis of his research about UFO in this book. It isn't a book for UFOs beginner. But a brand new way to see this concept. From ages, people have seen curious thing on the sky with curious non-human people encounters. The main idea of Jacques is that : Civilisation has always explain it in relation to the civilisation. It was daemons in Europe Midle-Age, spys aircraft from Germany or Russia at the End of 19 th century. Now some said it's Extra Terrestrial technology but nothing prove it. It's only convenient to our technological space oriented civilisation. UFO are real, they exists from ages, they influence Man destiny and then it's a mind control system. A must have read.
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