Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The jocks Paperback – January 1, 1969


See all 12 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$17.99
Paperback
"Please retry"
$2.24
Paperback, January 1, 1969
Mass Market Paperback
"Please retry"
$3.99
Unknown Binding
"Please retry"
$1.74
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 278 pages
  • Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill; First edition (1969)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0006BZZZS
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.8 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,477,633 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
5 star
0
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See both customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Mark Cannon on October 29, 2005
Format: Paperback
Yes indeed, "The Jocks" was among the first in showing athletes as real people, warts and all. Even before Shecter and Jim Bouton, there was Jim BROSNAN, and I think of his "The Long Season" as the pioneering work, although for the most part Brosnan was quiet about the "warts." In "The Jocks," Leonard Shecter took this next step, and then he and Jim Bouton continued in that direction with "Ball Four."

I first became aware of "The Jocks" after "Ball Four," and it was then interesting to find that Shecter himself had delved in this direction. Shecter and Bouton appear to have been literary soulmates, and in fact the nature and tone of the two books are so similar that I'd have to guess Bouton's development as an observer and writer were influenced by Shecter, whether through having read Shecter's work or through their collaboration.

One difference between the books, and the reason that I don't give "The Jocks" a "5," is that in my opinion this book goes way too far with the cynicism and bitterness. Unlike Bouton's book, where these aspects are more within-bounds and indeed functional, in this book they often seem gratuitous and indeed DYSfunctional on the author's part. I suppose his bitterness and inclination to view athletes negatively were understandable in view of his experiences with them, but I find many of his observations not just unnecessary but seemingly wrong.

Still, "The Jocks" was a groundbreaking book, with much more good than not. It was an important book, and it continues to be of significant interest.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John Schorg on September 20, 2005
Format: Paperback
"Ball Four" from Jim Bouton and "The Jocks" by Leonard Shecter were the first books I read as a kid that showed professional athletes were human beings rather than icons, and that the idealism and purity of our sports were better taken with a rather large grain of salt. It's no surprise that Shecter served as editor of Bouton's book. I remember being stunned by "The Jocks" when it first came out, and although times have changed greatly and tell-all books come out frequently, Shecter's cynical take still manages to be an eye-opener.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search