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The story-book of science; Paperback – September 12, 2011


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 422 pages
  • Publisher: Nabu Press (September 12, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1245151134
  • ISBN-13: 978-1245151139
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 0.9 x 9.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,181,736 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jean-Henri Casimir Fabre (1823-1915) was a French entomologist and author. Fabre was born in Saint-Léons in Aveyron, France. Fabre was largely an autodidact, owing to the poverty of his family. Nevertheless, he acquired a primary teaching certificate at the young age of 19 and began teaching in Carpentras whilst pursuing further studies. In 1849 he was appointed to a teaching post in Ajaccio (Corsica), then in 1849 moved on to the lycée in Avignon. Fabre went on to accomplish many scholarly achievements. He was a popular teacher, physicist, chemist and botanist. However, he is probably best known for his findings in the field of entomology, the study of insects, and is considered by many to be the father of modern entomology. Much of his enduring popularity is due to his marvelous teaching ability and his manner of writing about the lives of insects in biographical form, which he preferred to a clinically detached, journalistic mode of recording. In doing so he combined what he called "my passion for scientific truth" with keen observations and an engaging, colloquial style of writing. Fabre noted: Others again have reproached me with my style, which has not the solemnity, nay, better, the dryness of the schools. They fear lest a page that is read without fatigue should not always be the expression of the truth. Were I to take their word for it, we are profound only on condition of being obscure. Over the years he wrote a series of texts on insects and arachnids that are collectively known as the Souvenirs Entomologiques. Fabre's influence is felt in the later works of fellow naturalist Charles Darwin, who called Fabre "an inimitable observer". Fabre, however, rejected Darwin's theory of evolution; on the other hand he was not a Biblical creationist either but assumed a saltationist origin of biodiversity. In one of Fabre's most famous experiments, he arranged processionary caterpillars to form a continuous loop around the edge of a pot. As each caterpillar instinctively followed the silken trail of the caterpillars in front of it, the group moved around in a circle for seven days. Jean-Henri Fabre's last home and office, the Harmas de Fabre in Provence stands today as a museum devoted to his life and works. The site of his birth, at St Léons, near Millau is now the site of Micropolis, a tourist attraction dedicated to popularising entomology and a museum on his life. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

If you love to read to your children, this is a wonderful read-aloud book.
Galileo's Gang
I want to teach them a second language, but for sure reading this book and other types of books like it will accomplish the same thing in my opinion.
HappyAtHome
She gives the book four stars in general, and five stars in the category of "school books."
Polly Castor

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

50 of 51 people found the following review helpful By Polly Castor on June 4, 2009
Format: Paperback
I read this classic book by Jean Henri-Fabre (France 1823 - 1915) to my homeschooled 6th grader as supplementary science material this year. She gives the book four stars in general, and five stars in the category of "school books." She would often pick it out of the stack over other ongoing things.

Originally published in 1917, this is detailed science writing about nature, done in story form. "Uncle Paul" teaches his niece and nephews about nature with a passion and zeal rarely seen in science books.

The book was slow going, but we were savoring it and were not in a hurry. The chapters are short. It took us the whole school year to finish the 80 "stories" contained in the book. Our pace being leisurely, we enjoyed "Uncle Paul" (as we came to call to this book) and each session we either learned something new, or had our interest in something renewed or expanded. And the author's Godly perspective often left us discussing interesting implications of what we had learned. Because of the discussion possibilities, this book is best as a read aloud, and I believe was originally intended as one.

For example a profound discussion followed this: "There is no difference between queen-eggs and working bee eggs. Its treatment alone decides the issue for the egg. Treated in a certain manner, the young larvae becomes a queen, on whom depends the future prosperity of the hive; treated another way, it becomes one of the working people and is furnished with brushes and baskets. And what does not treatment, or education, accomplish with us in our tender years?"

He relates things in ways that were easy to picture, definitely talking to children but not down to them.
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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Galileo's Gang on December 21, 2008
Format: Paperback
If you love to read to your children, this is a wonderful read-aloud book. My 5 children are between the ages of 3-11 and all of them love this book. The short chapters are wonderfully written and the information is mind opening. The have learned so much--from ants to metals to electricity to paper. And--they retain the information! We plan on rereading it after we finish it.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Bethany J. Glozier on August 17, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Conceptually I love this book but it was way too wordy and indepth for my 3 & 5 year olds, we will try it again in a few years!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on April 28, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is an incredible book. My daughters (7 and 9) beg for more with every reading. They not only narrate but think and talk about the book for days - always asking more questions and wanting further understanding (the mark of a truly great book!)
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By R. Campbell on March 20, 2009
Format: Paperback
A delightful book full of wisdom. The stories inspire and provoke my children's curiosity and conscience. I highly recommend it...this review coming from a homeschool mother of seven.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Tna7477 on May 3, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
We use this book as our science book. We read and our children narrate it back! It is a great book!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By christa barnhizer on February 21, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
My children (ages 9&11). We used the Burgess Bird Book to supplement our Ornithology text, and The Story Book of Science to supplement Entomology. The kids enjoy it so much that we are continuing to read the chapters not about insects, just for fun.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By HappyAtHome on November 12, 2011
Format: Paperback
I love the books offered by Sandi Queen.
This is a challenging book even for me (I have to admit).
Toward the end, I did skip one or two chapters...I will have my husband cover those...they were just a bit over my head. I didn't understand what was trying to be communicated. (That doesn't usually happen with me on these books by this author).
I did find that I did have to "pre-digest" some of these stories.
What I mean by that is, I had to pre-read this, then at times present it in a way that would be easier to understand or that may not bore them.
Not all subjects were that way. This book actually flows very well like a story. I have read that you should read at about a level above your chld's reading level...this is it!! It is up to the parent to keep this interesting as well. You cannot read this stuff in a monotonous manner, or you will fall asleep before they do.
A great resource. You may want to pre-read some chapters to figure out how to present.
Very informative, eye-opening information here.
8/27/13
By the way, I have used this with children as young as 3. Is it wordy? Oh, yes it is. Wordy is a good way to put it. Wordy as in lots of adjectives that are used to really paint a picture. Wordy as in the use of words and phrases that give a lot of flavor to what is being said. This book is a book written by someone who live a long time ago, so this way of writing is not common today (at least in books that I usually read). I started reading this to my children when the children were 5 and 4 and my younger ones just listened. I read word for word, until I come to a word or phrase that they may not know or understand and I find a word or words that mean the same thing and repeat the word again as I commence the story.
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