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Thee, Hannah! Paperback – March 1, 2000


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 - 9 years
  • Grade Level: 02 - 04
  • Paperback: 99 pages
  • Publisher: Herald Press; 2nd edition (March 1, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0836191064
  • ISBN-13: 978-0836191066
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 0.2 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.3 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #542,964 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

The illustrations on this edition are lush and warm, as well.
Janice
I have read her books to my children and now I purchase them for my grandchildren for their parents to read to them and/or to be read by them.
Kathleen Hamalainen
At the end of the story, this slave tells Hannah that she knew Hannah would help her because of the bonnet she was wearing.
"elysianfields"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 45 people found the following review helpful By "elysianfields" on April 1, 2000
Format: Paperback
Hannah was a little Quaker girl who admired something that was considered taboo according to Quaker beliefs. That something was vanity, which was symbolized by a bonnet that her neighbor wore. It had pretty ribbons unlike the plain bonnets that the Quakers wore. The plot of the story does not become clear until near the end of the book. She realizes why it is so important for Quakers to put aside vanity. Hannah learns the true meaning of being a Quaker when she gets to assist runaway slaves who have become disconnected from the Underground Railroad trail. The slaves are a woman and her baby. The woman sees Hannah and beckons her to come to her hiding place in an alley. Hannah then tells her parents about the woman who is in the alley. That night, her parents and the other Friends find the woman and take her to the place where she is supposed to make her connection and join her husband. At the end of the story, this slave tells Hannah that she knew Hannah would help her because of the bonnet she was wearing. Quakers were known for their plain bonnets. This is how Hannah learned the true meaning of helping, which is what the Quaker religion is based on. I found this story to be as relevant today as it was when it was first written. As we still struggle in this country for freedoms, we must not forget that people are placed in positions to help us. The struggle for freedom does not belong to one single race. We accomplish this act by working together. Further, I found the book to be very sensitive, touching, and beautiful. Through the simplicity of the characters, their ideologies, and the author's surprising ending, the book stands out as an extraordinary and artistic literary work. MayfromOK@webtv.net
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33 of 34 people found the following review helpful By Quaker Annie on July 26, 2001
Format: Paperback
Hannah -- Nanny to her family -- is an 8 year old Quaker girl, living in Pennsylvania in the days of the the Underground Railroad. She loves pretty things -- ribbons or flowers on bonnets; pantaloons with lacy edges; colorful sashes wrapped around dresses. Of course, as plain folks, her family doesn't approve of these non-functional, showy things.
The language is old fashioned -- the family speaks in the old Friends way of using "thee" when addressing family members. Hannah gets into numerous mishaps, and after every one, her parents gently explain to her why she need not have frills to be valuable.
Hannah's mother says,"'Thee must wait till thee has learned that the color of the dress doesn't matter, and that pantalettes and sashes do not matter. Thee must learn what thy bonnet stands for. Thee must learn Quaker ways.' Mother patted Hannah's shoulder and told her to sit and think about it.
"Hannah thought and thought, but she couldn't quite understand what it all meant. 'Why can't Sally and I wear things the big girls wear? And what does my plain, ugly bonnet stand for?' she wondered. But she was unhappy to have made Mother sad, and when she went downstairs, she hoped she could remember to do everything just as Father wished."
But of course, there is still another temptation or two to surrender to, and the consequences to deal with. Hannah doesn't really understand until the very end of the book, when she is called upon by a runaway slave, whose little boy is sick, to get help. Hannah does this, and much later the woman explains to her how she knew Hannah could be trusted (having to do with the wearing of a plain bonnet.)
The story, written in the 1940's, is based on stories the young Marguerite de Angeli (b. 1889, d.
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21 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Kindle Customer on November 17, 2002
Format: Paperback
One of my favorite childhood books, I didn't even understand the runaway slave aspect until much later. What did always resonate, however, was the struggle that Hannah goes through to balance her desire for material possessions and beautiful things, with her parents' and her faith's wishes that teach her to be simple and rely on what is in her heart for her self worth. Her inner battles with envy over her more worldly friends is something every young girl can relate to. Hannah has weaknesses and she fails but she is always forgiven and her conscience is always at work - an excellent, thoughtful role model without being preachy. The reader struggles with Hannah to do the right thing and make the right choices. Plus the illustrations will stay with the reader a lifetime - Margeurite D'Angeli is a two time Caldecott honoree so words and pictures synthesize in a beautiful rhythm. I cannot recommend this book highly enough - it is a delight.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Martha H. on June 12, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I love this book. Remembered it from when I was a child. Had a profound impact on me as a child, and I remembered it when I went into a profession where I had to wear a "uniform" or costume for the job I pursued in the medical field. People have certain expectations of that uniform, and it was my responsibility to be open to the needs and suffering of others, and they knew they could trust me because of what that outfit said- I'm here to help you.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Plume45 on September 10, 2013
Format: Hardcover
This gentle 1940's book by De Angeli, based on true anecdotes and truer values, remains a sweet charmer even in the 21st century. It was a challenge back then to accept life without the frills. Eight-year-old Hannah is a typical girl who longs for ribbons, bright-colored clothing, fancy frills and pretty attire. Which is natural enough--but Not permissable or encouraged in a devout, Quaker family, where Plain and Simple are deemed best. The Lord looks on the heart--not on externals--but Hannah has a hard time accepting such a gloomy outlook.

Hannah's desire to look fashionable leads her into trouble or disgace on several oocasions--after which her mother gently amdonishes her re the necessity of observing and appreciating Quaker values. What Hannah only later comes to understand is that her religious sect, the Friends as they are called, were helpful to runaway slaves following the Underground railroad. Feminine Nature competes with Quaker Nurture in this short but charmingly quaint story--related with the traditional Thee's and Thou's, and authentically illustrated. Learning to accept modest dress is a valuable lesson for Hannah, as she grows to realize the importance of a simple bonnet. At the book's conclusion Hannah actually takes pride in modest attire--which has demonstrated serious social consequences--developing a Taste for Simplicity after all.
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