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Then Again, Maybe I Won't Paperback – April 13, 2010


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Then Again, Maybe I Won't + Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret. + Just As Long As We're Together
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Paperback: 192 pages
  • Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers; 1 Reprint edition (April 13, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385739842
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385739849
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.2 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (57 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #66,045 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 6-10 When his hardworking inventor father strikes it rich and moves the family from working class Jersey City to wealthy Rosemont, Tony Miglione finds that everything from friendships to school takes on a new and confusing twist. Suddenly his mother is intent on climbing the social ladder; his grandmother isn't allowed to cook for the family anymore since they've hired a housekeeper; and his older brother, Ralph, who's always wanted to be a teacher has suddenly decided to go into business. With a voice that calls to mind that awkward phase between being just a kid and the advent of puberty, actor Justin Long captures the discomfort and frustration of Tony's struggle to fit in with his new environment as well as his growing distrust and dislike of the "perfect" boy next door whose charming demeanor masks his compulsion to shoplift. Listening to this tape of the 1971 novel by Judy Blume is like listening in on exchange of stories in a "boys only" clubhouse - eye opening, funny, and poignant all at the same time.
Cindy Lombardo, Orrville Public Library, OH
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

"Tony Miglione is perfectly happy in Jersey City, and looking forward to going to junior high with his friends, so he is not at all pleased when he learns his father's invention has made the family rich....With a new school and burgeoning sexual yearnings to cope with, Tony is a troubled boy. Judy Blume does a fine job of seeing all this from a boy's viewpoint."--Saturday Review.

More About the Author

Judy Blume spent her childhood in Elizabeth, NJ, making up stories inside her head. She has spent her adult years in many places, doing the same thing, only now she writes her stories down on paper. Adults as well as children will recognize such Blume titles as: Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret; Superfudge; Blubber; Just As Long As We're Together; and Forever. She has also written the best-selling novels Wifey; Smart Women; and, Summer Sisters. More than 75 million copies of her books have been sold, and her work has been translated into twenty-six languages.
She receives thousands of letters each month from readers of all ages who share their feelings and
concerns with her.
Judy received a B.S. in education from New York University in 1961, which named her a Distinguished Alumna in 1996, the same year that American Library Association honored her with the Margaret A. Edwards Award for Lifetime Achievement. She has won more than ninety awards, none more important than those coming directly from her youngest readers.
She serves on the boards of the Author's Guild, currently as Vice President; the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators, where she sponsors an award for contemporary fiction; and the National Coalition Against Censorship, working to protect intellectual freedom. In Spring 2002, Judy was a spokesperson for the Cheerios "A Book for Every Child" literacy campaign which benefited Reading is Fundamental, America's largest literacy organization. She is also the founder and trustee of The Kids Fund, a charitable and educational foundation.
Judy's first book in the Fudge series, Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing, was published in 1972. She is thrilled to be celebrating its 30th Anniversary with the publication of Double Fudge. Just as generations of fans have loved the Fudge books, generations of Judy's family have inspired them. Thirty years ago, Fudge was inspired by her son, Larry, and now Double Fudge was written at the request of her grandson, Elliot.
Judy lives on islands up and down the East Coast with her husband George Cooper. They have three grown children and one grandchild.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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I would definitely recommend this book for teenagers and pre-teens.
cape miele
A well-written story with well-developed characters, this book is on any number of must-read lists for teens.
S. D Haynie
If you're ever looking for a good book to read, choose any Judy Blume title.
I love 80's Pop and Rock

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

48 of 51 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 20, 2000
Format: Paperback
I first read this book when I was about ten-years-old. That first time, I really enjoyed it, but I didn't understand a lot of it (like the stuff about wet dreams). About a year later, I read it again, and learned so much more than the previous time. I am now 14-years-old and have read this novel about five times, and I plan on reading it many times more, regardless of whether I now am supposedly "too old" for it. I am a girl, but I have gotten as much out of this book as any of Blume's involving female characters. In fact, I have probably learned more; now I understand guys so much better than I would have if I had never read this book. It is amazingly realistic and hilariously funny and I can see Tony in so many of the guys I know! I learned more from this novel than from any health class, and enjoyed it more than any T.V. show. All I can say in conclusion is, you absolutely must read this book, whether you are aged 9-12 or not!
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17 of 19 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 2, 1998
Format: Hardcover
I first read Then Again Maybe I Won't when I was about 13, and it has remained one of my favorite books. It is the only novel, in fact, that I have read more than 3 times. I enjoyed everything about this book, but most especially I was impressed with the maturity and insight of the main character, Tony. He was someone I could identify with, and at that tender age, he was also someone I would have loved to have met and spoken to as a friend. Ms. Blume has a way of fleshing out her characters and making them seem human. I have yet to read another children's book that captured so effectively the trauma of puberty, the confusion of adult relationships, and the painful reality of shirking your childhood to embrace the challenges of manhood. Read it! It's a great book.
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26 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 15, 2000
Format: Paperback
I got this book for Christmas from my aunt. I am a girl, and just like Tony, I am 13. This book was so good that my friends and i read it together! We use to think that guys didnt have to go through anything at all when it came to puberty, or that they had no inseccurities, but boy, were we wrong! We now realize that guys go through almost the same emotional and physical changes as girls. We have now learned to be more sensitive to things we say to guys. Without this book I am sure my friends and I would still be believing that only girls had it bad. I recommend this book to all girls (or boys) who think the way I use to!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 16, 1998
Format: Paperback
This book has been a favorite of mine ever since I read it in sixth grade, fourteen years ago. Since then I have read it countless times, relishing every page. The hero in the story, Tony Miglione, is very likeable as he goes through the trials and tribulations of growing up, searching for friends and dreaming of the beautiful girl next door. Reading this book should be mandatory for all boys!
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on February 7, 2006
Format: Paperback
As a fast read, this book is great. Boys twelve and thirteen can easily relate to Tony. Well, sort of. I live in the city, but that's just me. Anyway, the only problem I had was that is was too short. Better charachter development and possibly a more structured plot could have done the trick, but still a classic.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 23, 1999
Format: Paperback
For everyone who's ever wanted binoculaurs for something other than bird-watching, for everyone who ever wished they had a raincoat as they headed to the chalkboard to do a math problem, for everyone who ever had an ugly girl pine after them while the golden girl was just out of reach, this book will ring so true to life. I read it at 10 or so and knew that the next couple of years would be trying as my life changed, but there was someone who understood what it was like: Judy Blume. An excellent companion piece to Are You There God? It's Me Margaret. Many parallels can be drawn and I'm sure a graduate thesis awaits someone.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 14, 1999
Format: Paperback
I think "Then Again, Maybe I Won't" is not as interesting as "Tiger Eyes" but still I think "Then Again, Maybe I Won't" is pretty good. I think it might have been better if I'm a boy, seeing things in the boy's kind of view. I recommend this book to those who love Judy Blume's book.
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12 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on July 21, 2001
Format: Paperback
There are hundreds of stories about coming of age. But most are told in the female perspective. Judy Blume's Then Again, Maybe I won't, is written in the male perspective. This is a nice changein young adult literature. Tony is a typical boy who lives in a suburb and his life is pretty normal. That is until his father invents some type of electrical circuit which gets his family extremely rich. Tony and his family move to a rich, classy neighborhood. There, he realizes how money changes people. He also makes a friend who has a terrible shoplifting habit. Should Tony tell someone? Tony also is growing up. The one flaw to the story was the ending. But, as far as YA fiction goes, it is well-done.
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