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Theologian Trading Cards Book Supplement – November 24, 2012


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Product Details

  • Misc. Supplies: 310 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan; Crds edition (November 24, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310328586
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310328582
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 4.3 x 2.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.5 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #662,882 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"I first saw this idea some time back and thought Norman Jeune's idea was fantastic. Not only because I loved baseball cards and had plenty of them -- and that my mother threw them all away -- but because some conversation around theologians by young theologians is important. I pray these cards will help educate students and then lead them to read the greats. I'll trade you a Luther for a Barth!"
-Scot McKnight, Karl A. Olsson Professor in Religious Studies, North Park University

"These Theologian Trading Cards are a great way to learn more about Christian theology. Combining pithy facts about great thinkers past and present with the appeal of the trading card format makes these instant collectors items with a high theology-nerd value. Never has Church History been so much fun!"
-Oliver D. Crisp, Professor of Systematic Theology, Fuller Theological Seminary

"Theologian Trading Cards makes me MAD, for two reasons: 1) I didn't think of it first, and 2) I'm not one of the theologians! But seriously, this is fantastic. 300 theologians and philosophers broken into 15 teams. Everyone from Wittgenstein to Augustine to Bacon to Ephrem the Syrian. The set is helpful and fun."
-Tony Jones, Author, Theologian, Church Consultant

Review

“Theologian Trading Cards makes me MAD, for two reasons: 1) I didn’t think of it first; and 2) I’m not one of the theologians! But seriously, this is fantastic. 300 theologians and philosophers broken into 15 teams. Everyone from Wittgenstein to Augustine to Bacon to Ephrem the Syrian. The set is helpful and fun.” -- Tony Jones

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Customer Reviews

Cards with nice picture and concise information.
yu
I would have included Charles Spurgeon, G.K. Chesterton, C.S. Lewis, Fulton Sheen, Francis Schaeffer, and Alister McGrath (I am sure more could be added).
Canuck Monk
They are a fun quick-reference, and something we keep in the car to read together on drives.
Laura Quave

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful By J. ERVIN on November 21, 2012
Format: Misc. Supplies Verified Purchase
The cards themselves are decently made and come in a nice box. The creator did a good job in picking the most pertinent information regarding each person to put on the limited amount of space on the back of the cards.

The product's virtue comes from its very nature. The idea of theologian trading cards is probably something that only theology buffs would have considered before. Still, these are the first cards of their kind and thus have a nice novelty about them.

One of the major problems comes from there being no art on several of the cards. Only a blank silhouette is provided with a question mark on it. This comes across as lazy given that a simple Google image search provides many pictures of those such as Tertullian. Surely some of the art is old enough that permission would not even be needed for its use? Some of the card's art is just a simple sketch that is so laughably bad that even this reviewer (who has no artistic skill) could do better. Also, color on some of the art would have been appreciated.

Some of the choices of who got cards and who did not are vexing. I'm an instructor of systematic theology for a seminary and have never even heard of Rosemary Radford Ruether. That in itself would be completely understandable if other far more influential thinkers had been included but were not. Where is Pope Leo X, Pope Alexander VI, Arnold Fruchtenbaum, Charles Ryrie or Cornelius Van Til?

Some of the team placement comes across a tad arbitrary. Why is Jakob Arminius on a team with John Calvin that is called the "Geneva SOVEREIGNS?" (emphasis added) Is it only because he was a student of Beza?
Even with these criticisms in mind I do not regret purchasing the product and would encourage anyone who is a theology geek to buy some.

In Christ,
Matthew Ervin
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By R. Hayton VINE VOICE on January 12, 2013
Format: Misc. Supplies
Zondervan has released an interesting twist on studying church history and theology: Theologian Trading Cards: A Fun Way to Learn Church History and Theology developed by Norman Jeune III. These cards are promising as a tool for educators and parents who seek to make the study of church history and theology fun.

The cards have a glossy finish with colorful borders surrounding black and white photographs, or more frequently classic portraits or artists' depictions of the various characters. The 288 individuals highlighted in this set span all of Christian church history from the early second century down to influential theologians and philosophers today. Just like a typical sports card, the back of each card gives biographical information and details the significance of the "player." It isn't stats that are given pride of place, however, instead the series highlights influential works, famous events and the martyrdom of the various "athletes."

The set of cards is divided into several "teams" or groupings of characters by theme, era or some other distinguishing factor. Some of these teams seem a bit of a stretch when you see who makes up that particular team, and others make you wonder why they were included in a set of "theologian" trading cards. But for the most part, the groupings are understandable. I'll list them below:

Orthodoxy Dodgers (Heretics)
St.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Danika Cooley on December 15, 2012
Format: Misc. Supplies
I love Church history. I think that one of the most important things we can do to help our kids face the future is to help them understand the past. In fact, I think one of the great tragedies that has occurred in both education - and in the Church - is that we no longer know where we came from. We don't know who has gone before us. We don't know our history.

A new product from Zondervan and author Norman Jeune III can help.

When we're evaluating political issues, if we don't understand Marxism - and the tremendous pain it has caused over the decades - we may not recognize the danger it carries with it. Even worse, we may not recognize Marxism at all (for it is inevitably packaged as something else). How do we solve this? We educate ourselves - and our children. We learn about Karl Marx - who he was, and what he taught.

Likewise, in the spiritual realm, if we don't understand Arianism -- and recognize the heresy that it is - we may not recognize it when it shows up in the pulpit, on the page, or on the television. We may not understand the fight against Arianism that has been occurring for centuries - and we may not understand why. The solution? Education. We need to know who Arius was, and what he taught. We also need to teach it to our kids.

That said, educating our kids about the great thinkers in the Christian tradition can be an arduous undertaking. There are increasingly fantastic resources available to help our children learn, but those only touch the tip of the iceberg. The tip is important, but what about the body of information beneath? What if our children don't go to seminary? Will they ever know the people who shaped Christian thought?
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