Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

28 of 30 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon May 6, 2007
Mix the neurosis of the young Woody Allen, the sublime-but-unexpected logic of comedian Steven Wright, the macabre wink of Gahan Wilson, the grand guignol of Charles Addams, the cleverness of the Far Side -- with just a dash of the heart-strings and plaintive cuteness of Cathy Guisewhite -- and you may have something like the outstandingly amusing cartoons of Roz Chast. Penned in a manner that suggests hands trembling constantly from too much coffee or perhaps too little electroshock therapy, there is a pervasive nervous energy in this work that, frankly, makes you want to stop looking at them after a while, in the same way that a strong vinaigrette forces you to pause between bites. You go back, of course, because it's delicious. But you can't take too much at one time.

The targets of Ms. Chast's work include just about everything and everybody you will encounter in your life and it is very unlikely there is an interpersonal relationship you are suffering through that will not be present on these pages in a way that helps you laugh at your own small worries. She also nicely deals with the blither of modern life, from retail stores to the proliferation of award categories.

Roz Chast's work is jittery and completely on-target. I recommend this book highly to those who like off-beat visual humor.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on January 15, 2007
A genius overdose of Roz Chast, for old fans and new. This woman does, of course, know Everything, though like a good novelist or scriptwriter (or deity), she also knows how to wrap Everything in a few swathes of complication and irony to make the whole process more fun. If (or rather, when) future historians rummage among the rubble of our stab at civilization, I hope they find a pristine copy of THEORIES OF EVERYTHING (memo: buy extra copy and suitable-sized lead container to bury in garden), they will be able to piece together just about all they need to know about us. Worried, overweight men with small moustaches and clever small women with glasses were what we were about, and don't let anyone tell you any different, not now and certainly not in 3000 AD.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on March 20, 2007
If the universe is really made up of tiny strings, as some physicists argue, the work of cartoonist Roz Chast is the first comprehensive, and comprehensible, proof.

Almost 30 years of Chast's nervous little drawings, created mainly for The New Yorker, have been collected in a ridiculously huge volume called "Theories of Everything," published by Bloomsbury. David Remnick, editor of the New Yorker, introduces the collection.

The book's weighty title (and weighty weight) is part of the joke. Chast's kitchen-sink characters and fussy squiggles insult the very notion of a pretentious coffee-table book. Each panel looks as if it's been crumpled up, left in the pocket of a denim jumper and sent through the wash twice. The pages swarm with balding, dot-eyed men, dowdy ladies in horn-rimmed glasses, and dumb kids with one protruding tooth. Background objects like floor rugs, lamps and couches are rendered as itchy glyphs.

Under the big-little-book joke, however, lies a big-big-book genius. Using bathwater-gray washes and tiny lines that clump like hair in a bathroom drain, Chast maps out the interstices of the human mind, the between-meals, between-shaves, between-everything hours that fill the vast majority of life.

For example, as a man watches an opera, we are privy to his innermost thoughts. "La, la, la, duck falling off a ladder...ha, ha, Ethel Merman's shoe," he muses to himself as he falls asleep. Another man sits on a couch with a thought balloon over his head: "Birth, bed, bath, beer, bankruptcy, bunions, bifocals, balding and beyond."

Thanks to the unfathomable origami of Chast's thought processes, we learn of suddenly indispensable categories of behavior such as the "mini-rebellion:" "When writing a thank-you letter for a disliked gift, make deliberate spelling and grammatical errors."

This is not the "have you ever noticed?" lint dredged by hundreds of stand-up comics. Life is a big deal, Chast seems to say -- just not in the way everybody wants you to think it is. If you're looking for the essence of the universe, better to contemplate the mysteriously shifting doily on the sofa or that doomed restaurant on the corner that keeps changing hands.

On one page, she lays out the contents of a mock-ambitious book entitled "The Piece of Thread," including dedication, acknowledgments and copyright page. Is she skewering self-important authors or celebrating the cheerful human delusion that life and work have meaning? Why pick?

Chast loves to layer alien categories on top of one another, where they wobble like incompatible jello molds. In "How Much Should You Tip?" she informs us that for teachers, "20 percent of tuition at the end of the semester is the usual amount." A panel from "Adult Absence Notes" reads: "Please excuse my daughter from conjugal duties tonight. She has a 24-hour virus."

Since Chast's first cartoon was published in 1978, her work has moved away from cryptic visual haikus to longer storylines, some of them skirting the abyss of marital-miscommunication and child-rearing humor best left to less gifted humorists. Many of the longer stories, however, penetrate into corners of the mind never plumbed by poets, philosophers or psychiatrists.

In "Millie's Gear Slips," arguably Chast's masterpiece, a woman suddenly realizes she has forgotten to bring her sweater on a family vacation. It takes only four minutes and 11 seconds to turn around and get the sweater, but Millie becomes obsessed with the time gap. "This is exactly the place I would have been four minutes and 11 seconds ago, but now it's slightly different, and I'll never see what I was supposed to see," she keeps thinking.

In gets worse in ways that are worth describing because they reveal the essence of Chast.

Millie sits in the passenger seat, her husband and family grinning obliviously as she reaches a horrifying inner conclusion: "My real life now = (my real life) - (four minutes + 11 seconds)!" (Chast has a mild obsession with mathematics that frequenly pops up in unsuitable contexts.) In a classic Chastian moment, Millie stands in the supermarket, thinking "Normally I would have been in Aisle Three, but here I am, amongst the produce."

Amongst the produce! You lose half the humor without the visuals, but suffice it to say only Chast could have turned that phrase. She peels life's onion from normal to strange and back to normal with the skill of an existential Julia Child. Thanks to this generous new collection, her fans can linger "amongst the produce" as long as they please.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on March 9, 2007
At last for fans of R. Chast. This book is so funny that you cannot put it down and will annoy everyone in the house by laughing out loud every 30 seconds to the exclusion of every other activity for the rest of the day.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
on February 21, 2007
Roz Chast is a brilliant cartoonist, as all readers of the New Yorker know. But this large compilation--so big it will hurt your wrists--demonstrates her range and skills conclusively. A big, big helping of Chast's work in a long-lasting form; now you can take down all those clippings from the refrigerator door.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on September 13, 2007
This collection of Roz Chast cartoons brings me great joy and delight. It's fun to watch the evolution of her particular "style" from her earlier works to recent years. All of my favorites are here (i.e. "Inside One's Memory Bank", etc.) Some people don't "get" her, and that's fine with me ("Can't come to the U.S. to buy property -- I have to finish Scrubbing This Teakettle!") She draws some of my favorite cartoon facial expressions ever and I have a secret dream of someday owning an actual cartoon she penned or seeing my likeness as drawn by Roz. Those fantasies may never happen, but in the meantime I forked over the bucks for this great big old book and am so glad that I did. Where else can I relish a world of "Bad Mom" magazine and "The kid who learned about math on the street"?
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on March 8, 2007
The book weighs a ton and it is worth lifting, carrying around, and reading as much as possible. It is better than red popsicles and almost as good as dark chocolate covered carmels (the good ones). It is like someone excised all of the best parts of "The New Yorker" and installed them into one book. If you are a fan of Roz Chast, tell a good friend to buy it for you for your birthday... or if you have no friends buy it for your own birhtday.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on March 23, 2007
Roz Chast has the uncanny ability to find hilarity in the everyday. Her cartoons will have you laughing out loud in recognition of your own similar experiences, feelings and thoughts (both as a child and as an adult). Unlike many collections of cartoons, there is hardly a dud among the hundreds collected here. Highly recommended.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on February 20, 2007
I thoroughly enjoyed reading this volume of cartoons. Chaste targets so many of the foibles of family and society with humor and a touch of venom. Perhaps the same feeling that a fly has, caught in the spider web. Alas, too late!!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on January 15, 2007
Splendid book filled with amusing musings. Acerbic, incisive, whimsical and triggering many loud laughs, this book is an excellent introduction to those ignorant of Chast's talent. For those of us already fans, it is an enjoyable compilation of her oeuvre.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
Can't We Talk about Something More Pleasant?: A Memoir
Can't We Talk about Something More Pleasant?: A Memoir by Roz Chast (Hardcover - May 6, 2014)
$19.57

The Party, After You Left
The Party, After You Left by Roz Chast (Hardcover - October 21, 2014)
$12.97

What I Hate: From A to Z
What I Hate: From A to Z by Roz Chast (Hardcover - October 11, 2011)
$10.78
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.