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Therapy for the Sane Paperback – April 24, 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Bloomsbury USA (April 24, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1582344477
  • ISBN-13: 978-1582344478
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.6 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,199,145 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Lou Marinoff is a fellow pilgrim, always ready to tell the story that hasn't been told, always ready to take the risks that haven't been taken."-Paulo Coelho, author of The Alchemist

"Bracing, bold, expansive, easy to understand, companiable, and dare I say it, highly therapeutic."-Phyllis Chesler, Ph.D., author of Woman's Inhumanity to Woman

"This is therapy for the thoughtful."-Arlene Getz, Newsweek

"One of the prime movers behind the contemporary phenomenon of philosophical counseling."-Tom Morris, Ph.D., author of Philosophy for Dummies and The Art of Achievement

"Guiding the reader through the finest work of the human mind. Problem-solving becomes an uplifting adventure."-Laura Huxley, author of You Are Not the Target and This Timeless Moment

"A must-read, Therapy for the Sane shows that philosophy is as essential to a healthy mind as food and water are to a healthy body."-William Irwin, Ph.D., editor of The Matrix and Philosophy

From the Publisher

Praise for Plato, Not Prozac!:
"What exactly is philosophical practice? Marinoff calls it 'therapy for the sane.' In a nutshell, it's using the 2,500-year-old tradition of philosophy to solve everyday problems, like work, relationship and family issues. It's a return to what philosophy was meant to be - a guideline for a way of life."-Salon
"Plato, Not Prozac! looks to become the bible of the 'philosophical counseling' movement." -Philadelphia Inquirer Magazine "The ancient thinkers often characterized philosophy as 'medicine for the soul.' Marinoff provides a generous dose throughout these lively pages. I highly recommend it!"-Tom Morris, Ph.D., author of Philosophy for Dummies --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

2.9 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 17 people found the following review helpful By William A Bradnan on June 3, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Once in a great while in my reading, I come across a gem, and Chapter 2 of Lou Marinoff's new book is just one such! It is the best summarization of ethics for the layman, you might say, that I have come across. The distinction between ethical relativism and meta-ethical relativism was especially nicely done.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 18, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
having only read half of this book i can still say that these reviews make no sense to me (being way too negative). This book is not just a guide to philisophy it is also a guide to how to live your life. In doing the latter it is a phenominal help to any rational and intelligent person. Half way through the book i have already taken some of marinoff's advise and, surprising to me, numerous people have already commented how much happier i seem. I guess the question should really be whether or not you are willing to face the bigger issues in your life. if you are, this book will help. if not, look at psychology and fixate on the micro-issues. What can i say, i really like the book?
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amanda Rae Walker on April 21, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I found this book to be interesting as well as thought-provoking. The author had each chapter listed as a question that he has found to be relevant to our lives at one point or another, such as "What is Love?", "Are You Offended, Or Are You Harmed?", "Must You Suffer?", and "How can You Handle Change?".

In each chapter, the author explains how using philosophy can help you to answer these questions and apply them to your life in order to make positive changes within. He gives readers a new way to look at certain situations, like just because you are offended by someone, does not mean that any harm has been caused to you. You have the power to accept the offense or let it go. The author also gives examples of real-life situations taken from clients of his philosophical counseling practice. He applies what he has taught in each chapter to an event that we can understand more fully and how the process of using philosophy really can change your life.
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Format: Hardcover
Lou Marinoff covers just about the whole range of potential areas where one might need practical philosophy for help. His message is that, barring a few exceptions, most disease, especially psychological disease, is not disease at all but what he terms dis-ease, or the mental malaise resulting from the way we perceive or respond to life's challenges. His prescription is application of philosophical teachings, from Socrates on down the line, and more or less cherry picking whichever philosophical style works. At the same time, Marinoff urges the reader to identify and define their own personal philosophy, so that this will be available as a resource ahead of time, before crisis strikes and catches one unprepared. As in a review I wrote of Marinoff's Plato, Not Prozac!: Applying Eternal Wisdom to Everyday Problems, I see how the eclectic approach is the approach that most people use anyway, moving from stoicism to perhaps transcendentalism as the situation requires. This is not necessarily a bad thing, even for those who are of orthodox faiths - it's just the way you may operate anyway; at least acknowledge it and use it to the greatest advantage.

My quibble with Marinoff in this work is his lack of references. At times he makes claims and draws conclusions that require referencing whichever source he draws from, since he uses concepts and principles from other disciplines, like evolution and psychology. Is conditional fatherly love really the kind of love that a child needs (in addition to unconditional motherly love)? I have never heard of this position on parenting and would have liked to see references to the original sources.
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By J. G. Lawson on October 24, 2007
Format: Paperback
I picked this book up never having read THE BIG QUESTION by Marinoff that is mentioned in other reviews. The ideas in this book are interesting and the writing style is thought provoking and funny. Its great!
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