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Theras and His Town Paperback – January 1, 2005


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Theras and His Town + Greek Myths + The Golden Goblet (Newbery Library, Puffin)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: American Home School Publishin (2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 096670679X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0966706796
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 5.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #254,045 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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Perfect reading for 6th graders!
R. Johnston
Theras and His Town is a great book because it makes you want to read on, it is interesting, and the story is well written.
K. Garcia
In the beginning of the book, Theras, a young Athenian boy, lives a happy childhood with his family in Athens.
Mother of 9

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Mother of 9 on February 27, 2008
Format: Paperback
This book is set in ancient Greece, in two towns, Athens and Sparta. Athens is a beautiful city, with fine art, architecture, and music. Sparta is a small town with unadorned buildings, little art, and no music. In the beginning of the book, Theras, a young Athenian boy, lives a happy childhood with his family in Athens. He goes to school, where he learns to write and sing, and does athletics every day. One day Theras' father, Pheidon, is called to war far away from Athens, and he departs, leaving his family behind. Everything is fine for a few weeks, until they receive a distressing message from cousin Metion that Pheidon is lost at war. Theras' mother is forced to sell the house, and Theras is sent to Sparta to live with a distant relative.

In Sparta, Theras is made to live as a Spartan boy, separated from his parents, and trained as a soldier. After a year of this life, Theras wishes urgently to go home and live his old Athenian life. Eventually, Theras flees from Sparta with another boy, Abas, who also wishes to go. Theras and Abas must then endure many perils in the wilderness road to Athens, just to be free.

Theras and His Town is excellent. This book has suspense and excitement aplenty, with difficulties for Theras, who is brave and loyal. The book also has plenty of historic information about Greece, Athens, and Sparta. (This book review was written by a 6th grade, 11 year old Calvert School student, and published by his Mom.)
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on January 17, 2005
Format: Paperback
Theras and his Town is a book about a 5th century young boy who lives in Athens. When his father goes off to war he is killed. His mother is not able to work because of the culture. Therefore a cousin named Mention has to take care of them and he makes, Theras go to Sparta.

Sparta is a city south west of Athens. In Sparta they believe in harsh strict rules, very disciplined military and bloody sacrifices. This is very different from Athens where they believe in singing, art and have kind gods. There Theras goes and is very miserable and doesn't like the way the Spartans live. Finally he finds a shepherd boy named Abas, who helps him escape from Sparta. After a long dangerous journey he makes is to Athens alive. There he finds out that his father may be alive too.

I think this would be a very good book for someone who is studying Athens and Sparta. It vividly describes both of them and shows how it is to live in them. The age group would be around 8-10 because that's how old Theras was. I enjoyed this book because it told so much about Greece and Sparta.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on December 28, 2004
Format: Paperback
[...]

If you were taken away from your family and brought to an unknown place full of strangers, what would you do? This happens to Theras in Caroline Dale Snedeker's adventure novel Theras and His Town. Theras has to fight his way back home to Athens, where his family is before being caught by the Spartans.

The story is set in 5th century Greece, and tells of a brave young Athenian boy, Theras, who loves his town. One day his father goes into battle then news comes telling of his death. Theras' mother wasn't allowed to work. As a result, the mean uncle came, took over the family finances and gave Theras to his cousin to take to Sparta.

The Spartan life was much different then Athenian life. Theras was miserable and missed his family. His life was so bad in Sparta that one day he ran away. He met a boy named Abas and took him on his long journey, to Athens, where they could both be free. Along the way, they encounter many obstacles and dangerous choices that finally lead them safely back to Athens.

Theras and His Town is a very good book. It is full of suspense as Theras takes risks, toughs out bad situations, and learns about not giving up. I recommend it to readers who like an adventurous book about a boy who wouldn't let anything stop him until he got back home with his family.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By R. Johnston on November 30, 2004
Format: Paperback
This book is a classic from years back, and shows an innocence we don't often see in 6th grade literature anymore. It has some battle-type scenes, criminals, and danger, but nothing of which nightmares are made, and no cursing or sex whatsoever. Perfect reading for 6th graders!

This tale is set in 5th century Greece, and tells of a young Athenian boy, Theras, who loves his town. Through a series of unfortunate events (say.... that sounds familiar....) his father is sent off to battle, his mother loses the family place, and his wicked uncle takes over the family finances. Theras is packed off to Sparta, where he discovers much that is different from life in Athens. Seeing the differences between the two cities through the eyes of a young boy (maybe 12 years old? Maybe less?) makes it perhaps more vivid for young readers. As a teacher, I am concerned that a lot of the contrasts are too subtly presented for them to really notice it, something that can be addressed in discussion with the child. Eventually of course he must find a way to escape from Sparta and return to his family in Athens. Most of the book deals with this problem.

On the whole, I like this book. I use it when my 6th grade History class is studying ancient Greece, along with a good copy of the Iliad and The Odyssey, and of course, Du'Laire's Book fo Greek Myths. My own children have read it and said it "wasn't bad." I cannot say that they loved it, but I can say they did not hate it. Theras is a bit too virtuous for youth to really connect with him, as he amost never thinks a bad though, fails to keep an obligation, or do his duty. On the one occasion when he DOES rebel, REALLY BAD THINGS happen to him. The lesson is a bit heavy handed. I found myself cheering the kid on when he got mischievious.
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