There Are No Words and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

There Are No Words Perfect Paperback – September 28, 2009


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Perfect Paperback, September 28, 2009
$2.75 $0.01
100%20Children%27s%20Books%20to%20Read%20in%20a%20Lifetime

Customers Who Viewed This Item Also Viewed

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Product Details

  • Perfect Paperback: 132 pages
  • Publisher: Lucky Press, LLC; 1st edition (September 28, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0977630021
  • ISBN-13: 978-0977630028
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 9 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,208,717 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"There Are No Words has a great deal to say! Its message is hopeful and timeless, and in my opinion, especially appropriate for young people who, though educated alongside their peers with autism, may not yet give them their due. Author Mary Calhoun Brown is to be commended for not only turning out a remarkable work of fiction, but also for making available a curriculum guide that further explores important themes and expands upon the message that, adversity is no match for the human spirit!" --Diane Twachtman Cullen, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, Autism Spectrum Quarterly, Spring 2010

"I can definitely say that your book will be chosen for the `Outstanding Books for Young People with Disabilities 2011' by the IBBY Documentation Centre in Norway... Your book is a beautiful, genuine story about love and friendship, and I think you have captured the true hyper sensitivity to touch and sounds that so many autistic persons experience. I can honestly tell you that when Jaxon said goodbye to her new friends and slipped back through the painting and into her own world, it brought tears to my eyes." --Heidi Cortner Boiesen, IBBY Documentation Centre of Books for Disabled Young People, Norway

"I am so impressed with your attention to detail and beautiful descriptions, not to mention your stick-to-it-iveness in getting it published. I'm taking a lesson! It is one thing to have empathy and another to be able to put across on paper the super-sensitivity to sound and touch. Wow. Your love of the characters shines through and the use of photos is brilliant. Boy, I could sure smell those roses and the leaves on the forest path. Great job!" --Sara Hunter, Sara Hunter Productions, award-winning author of The Unbreakable Code, a Smithsonian Notable Book for Children

"Your book, There Are No Words, is lovely. A fascinating entry in the world of autism through an endearing character going back into time to rescue her grandfather's best friend. In addition to being a great piece of writing, this book is for anyone wanting to learn more about autism from an "inside" view. There Are No Words has my highest recommendation." --Stephen Shore, author of Understanding Autism for Dummies;Beyond the Wall: Personal Experiences with Autism and Asperger Syndrome; Ask and Tell: Self-Advocacy and Disclosure for People on the Autism Spectrum

"The strongest aspect of the story is the unfolding mystery and adventure as Jaxon and her friends race against time, hoping to stop a train wreck and to rescue Oliver. There is real suspense, and Brown describes the action with vivid images, employing the same poetic language that she uses for the pastoral scenes in the beginning of the book. Despite the excitement of a train hurtling toward tragedy in the hours before dawn, the book maintains its peaceful, dreamlike feel throughout.

"There Are No Words is a quick read with thoroughly likable characters. The relationships between the characters are sweet while still being very real. Readers will be inspired by the patience of Jaxon's grandparents and the kindness of her friends.

"Quill says: A dream-like adventure that reads like poetry while challenging stereotypes." --Feathered Quill Book Reviews

From the Publisher

There Are No Words includes a Readers' Guide and an extensive Appendix for parents and teachers of more than forty online resources related to this story and autism.

More About the Author

Mary Calhoun Brown writes what she loves. Her first novel, "There Are No Words" won eleven literary awards, including the Eric Hoffer Book Award. Her most recent work "Pride & Prejudice With A Side of Grits" is written completely in the dialect of the American South and shines new light on Austen's beloved characters. Mary loves all things Austen, brownies and Diet Coke. She lives in beautiful West Virginia with four guys, three of whom she gave birth to.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
3
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 8 customer reviews
This was a great historical adventure story.
Janice M. Hidey
Author Mary Calhoun Brown has created a wonderful tale surrounded by actual events.
Coffee Addicted Writer's Reviews
A great read, and a great lesson for children and adults.
Carter T. Seaton

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Coffee Addicted Writer's Reviews TOP 1000 REVIEWER on May 27, 2012
Format: Hardcover
"There Are No Words" tells the story of a 12-year-old autistic girl named Jaxon McKenzie. She is mute, but she secretly loves to read. After her father passed away, her mother left her to be raised by her grandparents.

Late one night, Jaxon went downstairs to look at the painting her uncle had made. The painting of a path in the woods with two small figures in the background. One of the figures moves closer. The figure is of a girl. The girl whispers, "Come with us. We've been waiting for you."

Jaxon reaches out for the girl and steps into the painting. She is now out of her time and somehow able to talk. She befriends Sara, Dewey and Oliver. Soon she learns that she is in the year 1918. The year of the great train wreck.

"There Are No Words," is a fun, exciting adventure. Author Mary Calhoun Brown has created a wonderful tale surrounded by actual events. The book includes a reader's guide for parents and teachers. Children and adults will easily connect with the main character, Jaxon. I enjoyed reading the book and recommend it to anyone who likes historical fiction.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Carter T. Seaton on September 6, 2010
Format: Hardcover
Mary Calhoun Brown has explored what autism feels like through the eyes, ears, and emotions of Jaxon McKenzie in such a lovely way that you can't help but be pulled into her world - both of them. A great read, and a great lesson for children and adults.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By bookworm1858 VINE VOICE on July 3, 2010
Format: Hardcover
There Are No Words by Mary Calhoun Brown
Lucky Press, LLC, 2010
113 pages

Summary: Jaxon is a mute, literate, autistic girl who lives with her grandparents. One night she travels back in time and meets Sarah, Dewey, and Oliver Pack, her grandfather's best friend who died in a 1918 train accident. She ends up realizing that she traveled back in time in order to save Oliver-can she do it?

Thoughts: I really liked the concept and I found it very charming that Jaxon got to go back in time and affect it. It was pretty predictable but I found it engaging and I read it fairly quickly. I also appreciated the inclusion of additional resources for parents and educators although I'm not either.

I was a little confused about the time period. Her grandparents were 12 during WWI yet by the end Jaxon is using a computer. I'm not sure they'd have access to a computer in sixties or seventies when I assume this book starts. I also caught several typos which always disappoints me.

Overall: 4/5. Different from what I am used to seeing and enjoyable.

Cover: It reminds me of "This Property Is Condemned" which is not a good movie unless you are a huge Natalie Wood or Robert Redford fan but I still mostly liked it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By queenpanda on March 4, 2013
Format: Paperback
There are no words
Mary Calhoun Brown

No words for 12 year old Jaxon who is autistic until one night while she looking
at a picture her uncle made falls through and ends up in the time of the
great train wreck of 1918. She soon finds she can talk and finds friends in
Sara, Dewey, and Oliver.
I believe everyone of age can enjoy this and it will be a good addition to
personal librarys.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?