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These Three are One: The Practice of Trinitarian Theology Paperback – Import, 1998


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Product Details

  • Series: Challenges in Contemporary Theology
  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Wiley-Blackwell (1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557869634
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557869630
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,497,829 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By bjk1000@cam.ac.uk on January 25, 2000
Format: Paperback
Cunningham's scope in These Three Are One is breathtaking. He covers thinkers as diverse as Augustine, Wittgenstein and Toni Morrison. He shows the Trinity to be pivotal to our understanding of issues as diverse as sexuality, parenting and worship space. Yet despite the breadth, depth does not suffer - and there is a lightness of touch that should please both non-specialists and specialists alike. I suppose Cunningham's all-inclusive outlook makes perfect sense in a book which aims to show the doctrine of the Trinity to be "the central claim of the (Christian) faith, in which all other elements find their center".
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Format: Paperback
I came across Cunningham's book in my research about the the eternal generation of the Son. My review will be a general overview of main themes.

I appreciated his note to students and non-specialists, which anyone not very familiar with the Trinity should read and consider before buying this (very expensive but highly insightful) book.

He spends the first chapter considering his book and his contribution in light of contemporary trinitarian theology. This should give those not so up-to-speed with current controversies a good place to start.

Cunningham then starts with what he calls „Producing“ and it is here that he addressed my topic of interest the „processions“ of the Son and Spirit or as he puts it “God produces God”. I appreciated the centrality that he gave the topic of the generation of the Son and procession of the Spirit. It is exactly here that one is immediately faced with the mind-racking concept that „These Three are One“. Cunningham doesn't have much interest in keeping the traditional language of “begetting” and “spiration” but does note its biblical claim. Instead he spends time arguing for his phraseology of „Source, Wellspring, Living Water“ in place of (or to complement) the standard „Father, Son, Holy Spirit“. Not only gender (he wants us to remember God is not a man) plays a role in his argument but also his desire to tell us that the name point to „subsisting relations“ and the substantive names-Father, Son, and Spirit- unfortunately no longer point us to the reality of three undivideable subsisting relations of the one God. Rather we think of three independent metaphysical realities, further strained by the translation of hypostasis with “person” and the contemporary baggage that the word “person” carries.
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3 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Killian HALL OF FAME on March 3, 2005
Format: Paperback
While I am not a theologian myself I picked up this book and found myself immersed in the controversies behind the mysterious idea of the Trinity. In the Bible the Trinity is revealed, but it was apparently the early Christian fathers who elaborated on the sketchy, elemental Triune of "Father, Son, and Holy Spirit" that we learned as children. And just as children ask puzzledly, "How can three different people be the same?" their older friends and counsellors are also still puzzled on how best to understand what seems on the one hand as a lovely metaphor for relationality, but to others with a more fundamental view, it is an actual fact of the universe.

Cunningham notes that many of nature's little miracles seem to draw their inspiration from the three-pronged trident that is the Trinity. When John Donne prayed, "Batter my heart, three-personed God," he was bringing a metaphysical twist in to what had been heatedly argued over in Renaissance days. THESE THREE is similarly divided into three parts, and no one would say that the three parts resemble each other in any way.
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