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They Knew Too Much about Flying Saucers Paperback – June 1, 1997

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Illuminet Press (June 1, 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1881532100
  • ISBN-13: 978-1881532101
  • Product Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,587,438 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 30, 1998
Format: Paperback
Considering the reputation of the author as a bold-faced hoaxer, this book is still considered to be the one that started it all-Flying Saucers, Men-in-Black, Lemuria-it's all here. Although many current researchers and Roswell-philes may be quick to discredit and sweep Barker under the carpet, They Knew Too Much is still an integral part of the canon.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Skip Goforth on October 24, 2010
Format: Paperback
It was a half-century ago when my mother and I entered the dark,dusky interior of an old used bookstore on Market Street, in downtown St.Louis Missouri.

I was about ten years old, but I already had a burning interest in Flying Saucers, as most people called them back then.

It was a hot topic, and Saucer sightings were in the news all the time. I ate up every book and story I could find about these strange objects in the sky.

Then I saw a blue copy of Gray Barker's "They Knew Too Much About Flying Saucers", and mom let me buy it.

This book hooked me for a lifetime wanting to know everything about UFO's.

Finally, I saw one myself, in September of 1969, with three witnesses...a red glowing, silent egg-shaped light no more than 500 feet above us. It stuck around too, while we got out of the car and gazed upon it in silent wonder.

This glowing thing was a UFO in the strictest definition, but I have no idea what it was or where it came for, but it behaved like it was intelligently controlled, and it was very scary!

Back to Mr. Gray's book...skeptics nowadays say it was bogus from the start, but it's a great read, and like another reviewer said, it does belong in the canon of UFO literature.

I hope all of you reading this review gets to read this book and enjoy it as much as I did!
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14 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Jayson Olson on January 5, 1999
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I saw an advertisement for this book in a local newspaper and decided to purchase it.
While the book initially grabs you and pulls you in, towards the end you have read some of the most outlandish theories, over-dramatic musings, simpleton ways of thinking about the whole 'saucer' phenomenon.
It is a relatively easy read both in length and style and I'll have to admit it did hook me. But did it hook me because of the mystery of UFO's or because some of the explanations about UFO's and their relationship with humans, the earth, our world governments, conspiracies, religion are so wacky it was enticing to read what the author would say next.
It did present one or two theories that I did find very interesting and even plausible, and it did lend much more mystery to the Men In Black. Just who are these dark dressed men who answer nothing and interogate the victims of UFO incidents,then scaring them half to death.
This book is classic for the pulp science fiction readers of the late 40's and early 50's where science was mysterious to the common man. But now in 1999 it is really hard to believe (and embarrassing to know) that we as a society actually thought this way.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. Hughes on January 2, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'd like to be able to give half star ratings on some of this stuff. 2 1/2 for this one. The title and premise of this book is that the witness and insider accounts of the early days of the flying saucer phenomenon accounted for these fellows disappearing and/or going belly up. And I don't doubt that in some instances that might have been true. I found the book interesting enough to buy because it was such an early account of the phenomenon and as such important because the information was still fresh and strategies for disinformation were still evolving. However, if "they knew too much" then they took it to their graves, because the author is unable to relate anything here that would have gotten anyone killed - let alone pestered. Slightly interesting because of its vintage, but if you want to read about the early days then read Donald Keyhoe, Edward Ruppelt, J. Allen Hynek, etc.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By the science patrol on August 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
Allegedly, this is the book that launched the myth of the Men in Black, back in 1956 (the author does not capitalize or use the acronym).

It is a readable book, but not a good book. It has an easy journalistic style, very matter-of-fact, but with oddly interpolated melodramatic and exclamatory phrases! To remind you to be frightened, I presume.

The major weakness is the lack of info about UFOs. The few short case studies are nothing but a prelude to a lengthy investigation of how a few saucer magazine publishers got spooked into voluntarily shutting down (or so they claim -- several people in the book were still active in the following decades, according to the Skeptical Inquirer).

But it is interesting to read a front-line report of fringe phenomena where the protagonists TRUST the government and are not necessarily paranoia; when UFO tracking was a gee-whiz science hobby fuelled by intellectual curiosity and not a delusion about one-world governments or the occult.

Not a good book, but fun to read about a phenomenon before it became a phenomenon.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jeff Marzano on January 28, 2012
Format: Paperback
For me this was a great book to read. It captures views about flying saucers as those views existed back in the 1950s. I can almost imagine myself walking into a drug store back then and paying my 60 cents to buy this book.

The author published a magazine or newsletter called 'The Saucerian' and the readers got directly involved with trying to figure out what flying saucers really are.

According to Wikipedia this book contains the first references to the so called 'Men In Black'. These are the characters who visit people who 'know too much about flying saucers'.

That same Wikipedia article suggests that Barker didn't really believe the things he wrote about flying saucers. I don't know if that is the case but the book captures the atmosphere of the strange flying saucer phenomenon as it existed at that time.

This subject of intimidation by the MIB is very interesting. Based on other books I have read they do more than just threaten people.

Richard Dolan gets into this subject in this book:

UFOs and the National Security State: Chronology of a Coverup, 1941-1973

An author like that could probably create a great book dedicated to just this one subject of people being threatened, murdered, etc., because they knew too much.

It appears that the threats and potential violence against people who had knowledge about the flying discs goes back to when the phenomenon first started.

Kenneth Arnold was supposedly in danger at some point from the government spooks according to Dolan. Arnold thought of the term 'flying saucer'.
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