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on October 15, 2004
After leaving my job, I was disillusioned about the direction of my career in Corporate America until I picked up and read Levit's book. She provides a voice of reason and a voice of wisdom as she guides you through every stage of the corporate game to assure your own personal fulfillment and success. Levit gives the reader confidence and a new outlook because she does not just provide comforting words. She elucidates her point with concrete examples. With the "Take Home Points" section at the end of each chapter, she makes sure that she has drilled in the mind of her reader the key lessons to each chapter. She demystifies Corporate America as she decodes the lingo, reveals insider secrets and strategies to overcome the common obstacles all face, and provides tools to understand the psychology of the workplace. Chapters such as "The Purposeful Workday," which deals with time management, procrastination and organization, and "People Management," which tackles dealing with difficult people and managing relationships with coworkers, are a must read for anyone in any work environment. Stressed out? Consult Levit's chapter "Check Your Attitude at the Door" where she armors you with ways to combat negativity, anger, worry and stress to come out victorious!

This book is not a one-time read. I predict that readers all across the country will bring it to work as a reference guide.
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on April 10, 2007
I am a College Professor and I have been using "They Don't Teach Corporate in College" as a supplement to my "Supervisory Mangement" Class. Alexandra Levit is right on the mark with this book. The students have really enjoyed reading this book and have learned so much from it. I have incorporated this book into my class discussions and the students will be more prepared for the corporate world because of it!
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on September 26, 2004
I was so pleased with Alexandra Levit's guide to the business world that I had to express my feelings. It made me see my role as a new employee in a new way. I especially liked the chapter on People Management. I thought that would be for executives or managers and that new people like me were the managed ones. I didn't realize the ways that I could manage THEM. Thanks.
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on April 8, 2006
This is a great resource for anyone entering Corporate America. If you've worked in an organization in a non-professional position and think you know Corporate America--YOU DON'T. One might think the information is 'common sense', but too often we don't use common sense until someone makes the 'light bulb' go off. Alexandra does this beautifully! I highly recommend this book for any new grad. The examples are great and can apply to almost any corporate situation. For example, in my current role, as a new employee, other staff would constantly ask me to do task that was NOT my responsibility. Rather than say, NO, I said, I'm not sure if I handle that, you might want to ask my supervisor! This was GREAT advice! They were clearly trying to take advantage of me because I was new. (I was alarmed because they took me out to lunch, drilled me for information on my background, and asked me the same question 3 times, 3 different ways) Can you imagine what else they would have thrown at me had I said, sure, I'll do it? That might not sound too exciting, but trust me...as a new grad, in your first position, you are soooo eager to please everyone and show that you are a hardworker--you'll find yourself doing your work and everyone else's. Now those same co-workers ask for my help, and not try to insist that it's my job to do it. This way, I have the option of taking on extra work or not. With all that said, go ahead and invest in your corporate career--purchase the book!
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on April 6, 2006
This book came along at just the right time for me. I have recently joined the Americorps straight from college and have found it difficult to adjust to the business world. I was so confused because I was super smart in college and graduated at the top of my class. Then I started in the professional

world and all of the sudden I didn't know how to do anything. I was so used to doing my work and then getting it reviewed and receiving input before turning out the final product. Starting work was a shock. This book describes the exact tools you need to adjust and how to smoothly transition into the professional world after college. I would recommend it to anyone who is experiencing these types of feelings.
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on September 6, 2007
Managers searching to work with GenY employees would greatly benefit from reading this book. Why? Because it helps them bridge the gap and understand how Gen Y thinks. GenY wants two things: They want to be productive, and they want to succeed. Some traditionalist and baby boomers have a hard time understanding why Gen Y needs tools like a Blackberry to be productive. GenY wants these tools because they grew up with them. This is the generation that grew up IM'ing, texting, e-mailing, etc. They are most productive with these types of tools, and will blow your minds with their accomplishments if you provide them with what they need. Gen Y wants to feel useful and productive - you need to challenge them and their abilities and give them room to prove themselves.
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on March 29, 2005
This book is incredibly insightful! Her writing style is fun yet professional and the points that she makes are applicable whether you are currently looking for work, starting at a new company, or looking to get the most out of your current job. Additionally, I got to meet the author, Alexandra Levit, when she spoke at Northwestern University and she is the very definition of business savvy--I highly recommend taking her advice to heart.
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on August 14, 2013
A lot of idealistic people go into work very motivated and then are sad to find they are often bored, are asked to do boring things, and their effort is not rewarded. They can start stewing about the company or corporate world in general.

This book helps to break it down and show the issues from the managers' perspectives, so that it's clear it's not personal, and people can relax and focus on what's important and not get so offended or demoralized by the way things work.

Really helped me to enjoy my job more and realize that everything might be more ok than I thought, and warn me not to do some things I'd been doing, and to do more of certain things that would actually help me.
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on August 19, 2015
A professor of mine used this book in my business law class (I am a returning student) and I bought the book for both my sons who are graduating college this year. It has a wealth of information - it doesn't have to be read like a typical book, but can be used to look up situations to get ideas how to best handle them. Wish I had it years ago!
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on August 11, 2005
I picked up Alexandra Levits's book on a whim, even though I have been working for 25 years.
Well, I really enjoyed it, and I found plenty for anyone at any career stage. There were also quite a few 'Aha!' moments, which explained mysteries I have come across over time. The difference between 'work' and 'real' friends, for example. And how to manage people when you are new to it. And how to deal with certain bosses. And so on. I was also quite pleased to find that I had already worked out a few of these things for myself.

I wish my youngest sister had read this book a few years ago. We thought she had un-realistic expectations when she first started work, but she also has a knack for making her environment deliver those expectations, and is forging ahead, so good luck to her.

This book was an informative and entertaining read. Thanks, Alexandra.
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