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Thin Air Audio, Cassette – Unabridged, July, 2002


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Audio, Cassette, Unabridged, July, 2002
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Product Details

  • Audio Cassette
  • Publisher: New Millennium Audio; Unabridged edition (July 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 159007212X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1590072127
  • Product Dimensions: 7.1 x 4.6 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (50 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,606,327 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In the famed Boston PI's 22nd case, an oddly sympathetic villain and a resolute heroine draw Spenser into a barrio enclave in a depressed Massachusetts factory town. Readers know that Lisa St. Clair, a radio deejay newly married to a Boston police detective, has been kidnapped and imprisoned in a Proctor, Mass. tenement by Rico, her former lover. The cop, who knows only that his wife has disappeared, is shot and seriously injured just after he asks Spenser to investigate. Chapters alternate between the room where Lisa is kept under guard and constantly running video cameras and Spenser's gradual assembling of clues. The PI discovers Lisa's former name and occupation; he thinks up a way to penetrate Proctor's divided and desperate Hispanic community, ruled by Rico and a rival. Lots of atmosphere and even suspense?Will Lisa resist Rico's demands? Can Spenser discover a way to rescue her??are built up in short sentences and one-line paragraphs. Spenser's pal Hawk is away (his place taken briefly by the sharp L.A. crook, Chollo), and his lover, Susan, and dog Pearl are kept mostly backstage during a slightly stretched out story that, nevertheless, packs a lot of punch. Mystery Guild selection; Literary Guild alternate.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Spenser, Parker's most popular creation, here searches for a mysterious woman.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Robert B. Parker (1932-2010) has long been acknowledged as the dean of American crime fiction. His novel featuring the wise-cracking, street-smart Boston private-eye Spenser earned him a devoted following and reams of critical acclaim, typified by R.W.B. Lewis' comment, "We are witnessing one of the great series in the history of the American detective story" (The New York Times Book Review). In June and October of 2005, Parker had national bestsellers with APPALOOSA and SCHOOL DAYS, and continued his winning streak in February of 2006 with his latest Jesse Stone novel, SEA CHANGE.

Born and raised in Massachusetts, Parker attended Colby College in Maine, served with the Army in Korea, and then completed a Ph.D. in English at Boston University. He married his wife Joan in 1956; they raised two sons, David and Daniel. Together the Parkers founded Pearl Productions, a Boston-based independent film company named after their short-haired pointer, Pearl, who has also been featured in many of Parker's novels.

Parker began writing his Spenser novels in 1971 while teaching at Boston's Northeastern University. Little did he suspect then that his witty, literate prose and psychological insights would make him keeper-of-the-flame of America's rich tradition of detective fiction. Parker's fictional Spenser inspired the ABC-TV series Spenser: For Hire. In February 2005, CBS-TV broadcast its highly-rated adaptation of the Jesse Stone novel Stone Cold, which featured Tom Selleck in the lead role as Parker's small-town police chief. The second CBS movie, Night Passage, also scored high ratings, and the third, Death in Paradise, aired on April 30, 2006.

Parker was named Grand Master of the 2002 Edgar Awards by the Mystery Writers of America, an honor shared with earlier masters such as Alfred Hitchcock and Ellery Queen.

Parker died on January 19, 2010, at the age of 77.

Customer Reviews

He gave great descriptions when the story takes place.
Ry Rin
The ending was predictable, but all in all it was still a pretty good read.
Tania Hutchison
Over the past several weeks I have read 80% of the Spenser novels.
Kenneth C. Roth

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Elsie Wilson on January 3, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
More plot to this novel ~ more detecting too ~ than some other Spenser stories. Still, plot is not everything, and still not the real reason one reads Parker. The interplay between Spenser and Susan is as strong as ever; Hawk is in Burma ~ don't ask ~ so we miss seeing him and Spenser. There is a Hawk replacement in the person of Chollo, a Latino hit-man from one of Spenser's West Coast connexions and, while not as detailed or intricate as the Hawk conversations, his with Spenser are still pleasurable. The pretext for the action this time is the disappearance of Lisa St. Claire, wife of Spenser's Boston PD friend Frank Belson. When Belson is hit with three shots from behind Spenser activates himself and goes hunting. The trail leads to a Hispanic community in northern Massachusetts ~ hence the introduction of the Latino side-kick. A welcome innovation (from Parker, not for fiction as a whole) is the use of third person sections interspersed, in a different type-face, telling of Lisa's experience. We thus are given both the hunter and hunted points of view.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Daniel J. Connelly on November 26, 2000
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In Thin Air, Robert B Parker deviates from his normal mystery format and produces more of a thriller. What happened and who did it is never in question -- the issue is what will happen. While this is being resolved, Parker reveals rich details about the principal characters, keeping the reader engaged throughout the entire book.
Viewpoint varies with the primary chapters, as usual in the Spenser series, from the detectives perspective. Between these, the victim Lisa's view is represented. This is quite nicely pulled off.
The welcomed trend in the series of deemphasizing the tiresome participation of Susan in the primary plot continues with Thin Air. Additionally, giving a rest to the use of Hawk as a superhero to completely suppress any opposition is also welcomed. While Hawk is a very enjoyable character, he's overused in the books preceding this.
So Thin Air is highly recommended. If there is one criticism, some of the action at the end strains credibility to the point of collapse. But the reader is still touched by the result, something which can't often be said for genre work. This book only reinforces my assessment that Parker is an excellent writer.
Dan
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By m-lee on September 28, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This one is one of the better installments in the Spenser series. Hawk is not featured, but it was still surprisingly good with the addition of Chollo from California (from a previous story). Why Chollo would be willing to help Spenser fight this fight in Massachusetts was never explained, but it was still fun and effective. Highly recommended.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Ry Rin on August 16, 2004
Format: Audio Cassette
The story takes place in Boston, Massachusetts. The narrator of the story is Spenser, who was hired to find Lisa St. Claire. Spenser is a private detective who used to work for the FBI. He is hired by Frank Belson to find his missing wife who is Lisa St. Claire. Her ex-husband, Luis Deleon, has kidnapped her. Luis is still madly in love with Lisa. But Lisa is in love with Frank, who is much older than she is. Every one assumes she left him because he is much older than she is and that is why a private detective is hire. During the investigation, Spenser found out a lot of personal things about Lisa St. Claire. She was not the person every one thought she is. Her real name was Angela Richard. She ran away from home ever since she was seventeen with her boy friend, Woody. Woody turns her in to a prostitute. One day she got caught and was sent to rehabilitation. There she decided to get her life back on track. Mean while, Frank was shot at on his front porch from behind leaving him in the hospital for a while. Luis had shot him. Luis was known for being a crazy person. He was the leader of a Hispanic gang. Luis was a hard person to find because no one likes to talk about him. She was kept in a castle like place with cameras all around the room recording her every move. Through out the novel it switches back and forth to the scene where Lisa was at and then back to Spenser.

I would recommend the novel because I found it very entertaining. It was like watching a movie. I can picture the whole thing. Spenser was very amusing. He was also tough. He states. "You'll think I'm offensive? I'll give you offensive. Ms. Lisa St. Claire's husband is a cop. Cops look out for each other.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on January 31, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
When "Thin Air" begins with the italicized description of a woman bound in the back of a van, abducted by someone who knows her and is videotaping everything, it is reminiscent of Robert B. Parker's "Crimson Joy," the first Spenser novel to get away from the first person narrative style of the series. When Detective Frank Belson shows up and tells our hero that his wife is gone, we know the identity of the woman in the van. As far as her husband is concerned, Lisa St. Claire has disappeared into "Thin Air" (Parker has been much more mundane with his titles in his recent efforts and it has been years since he started off with any grandiose literary quotations). Each Spenser novel is unique in its own way and for this one the main trick is that we know what has happened to the damsel in distress and we get to watch as our hero gets closer and closer. Belson does not know anything about his wife before the fateful night they met, and, of course, Spenser uncovers a whole lot of information. But what looks like the old story of the beautiful young wife who leaves her older husband is shattered when Belson is ambushed and almost killed.
Whereas the previous Spenser novel dealt with Chinatown, "Thin Air" focuses on the Hispanic elements in the greater Boston area, which forces Spenser to use the assistance of Chollo, the enforcer for the L.A. mobster we met in "Stardust" (Hawk is in Burma--the mind boggles). But while most of the usual supporting cast is not around for this one, Spenser certainly meets a couple of interesting women in the course of his investigation (although I find it strange that Quirk is not a lot more involved in this one). Once again Spenser tries to put all the pieces together and then find a way of making everybody happy, but as usual, things never do work out perfectly. While certainly an atypical Spenser novel, "Thin Air" probably grades out as an average effort for Parker
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