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  • Thing-A-Ma-Bots Card Game by Gamewright
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Thing-A-Ma-Bots Card Game by Gamewright


Price: $33.43 + $4.99 shipping
Only 19 left in stock.
Ships from and sold by Skymind Games.
  • * Ages 6 and up
  • * 2 to 6 players
  • * Playing time: about 12 minutes
  • * 60 cards * rules in English and Spanish

Frequently Bought Together

Thing-A-Ma-Bots Card Game by Gamewright + Rat-A-Tat-Cat
Price for both: $42.65

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together
  • Rat-A-Tat-Cat $9.22


Product Details

  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • ASIN: B000H21CIA
  • Item model number: GWI5211
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #494,523 in Toys & Games (See Top 100 in Toys & Games)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
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Product Description

Gear up for a memory bender in this fast-playing card game of shouting silliness. Turn over a card and give the robot a name: Melvin, Spaghetti Head, GP-450, or whatever you imagine. When it shows up again, be the first to shout its name and you collect the stack of cards. Spot a robot match? Shout out "Thing-a-ma-BOT" and steal an opponent's stack! Collect the most robots to win the game. 2-6 Players Ages 6+

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Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By T. L. Barrett on April 9, 2007
Verified Purchase
I bought this for my kids to play, and because of their differing learning styles and ages, I found I had to moderate the game. It was best if played by a child and a loving and attentive adult. This way the child can be challenged without being demoralized by someone who has a quicker or more assertive verbal aspect. In any case, I think this would be a great game for a grandparent to play with a child.
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I decided I would play games with my 4-year-old. This would be our thing—our wholesome, educational, unplugged, thrifty, bonding, fun thing. Foolishly, I announced this plan to my husband, who thinks the main solution to our high-maintenance (Girls Gone Wild meets Little Rascals) daughter is to spend more one-on-one time with her. So, I’m on the hook. Did you know a single game of Candyland can go on for an hour or more? I do. Now. You would think this would sufficiently hose an impatient toddler and deter her from requesting it. Alas, no. The fifth time you near the finish and get sent back to Molasses Swamp may provoke a hissy fit (mine) but hope springs eternal! And don’t even get me started with Clue Jr. I’m just going to say that if you ignore the suggested age range on a game and think, ‘Oh, with a little help, we can play it and it’s only bound to put her even further ahead, developmentally,’ well, Dante, you’ve no one but yourself to blame for the circle of hell you have just stumbled into.

But I keep on truckin’, mostly because husband is in the background with the amused smile and the big thumbs up. And our girl is totally feeding off of this increased attention. I’m not saying she’s suddenly Anne of Green Gables but her “Pay attention to me!!!” mayhem is down at least two notches, so I soldier on. Whip out Thing-A-Ma-Bots to play for the first time. Yard sale purchase: 50 cents.

It’s a deck of 60 cards depicting 12 different robots. You’re trying to win as many matches as possible. The deck is divided evenly among the players and you take turns flipping over cards, naming each robot as you do, until there’s a match. When any player sees a match, he or she claims it by stating the robot’s name. This is where the magic comes in.
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By Pam Bredle on December 21, 2013
Verified Purchase
I'm a speech language pathologist, and I use this game in therapy to help develop attention and memory skills. Kids make up whatever name they want for the card they turn over, so it is good for creativity and expressive language and strategy, then they have to remember other people's robots' names and also quickly notice that the same card has appeared and say the name first to get the cards. 12 different cards, 5 of each, makes for variety and fun. Once kids have won a pile, they have to notice if that same card appears and whoever says "Thingamabots" first gets that win pile. This is one of the games that kids like as well as the IPad., and they are having a good time socializing as well. I don't know why the company stopped making this one!
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By Zhou Ting Ting on August 25, 2008
I use this game with my young ESL students. I teach classes of two to four kids and they invariably go crazy for it. Even a student with minimal English can learn to play it, and it encourages them to speak.
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