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The Thing from Another World (2003)

Margaret Sheridan , Kenneth Tobey , Christian Nyby  |  NR |  DVD
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (484 customer reviews)

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Product Details

  • Actors: Margaret Sheridan, Kenneth Tobey, Robert Cornthwaite, Douglas Spencer
  • Directors: Christian Nyby
  • Writers: John W. Campbell Jr., Charles Lederer
  • Producers: Howard Hawks, Edward Lasker
  • Format: Closed-captioned, Black & White, Full Screen, NTSC, Subtitled
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 1.0)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Turner Home Ent
  • DVD Release Date: August 5, 2003
  • Run Time: 87 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (484 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00009NHC0
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #5,835 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "The Thing from Another World" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Members of an Antarctic research team are killed off by a frozen alien they uncover.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
143 of 151 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars After a Half-Century, Still a Joy! August 8, 2003
Format:DVD|Verified Purchase
THE THING FROM ANOTHER WORLD...the title conjures up lurid images from the countless 'B' SciFi flicks of the 50s, but as many SF, Howard Hawks, and Classic Cinema fans can attest, this is no sleazy schlockfest, but one of the most entertaining and exciting films ever made, by one of Hollywood's greatest directors.
Yes, the credits list Christian Nyby as director, but Howard Hawks was on the set nearly every day, each scene has elements of style unique to Hawks, alone, and even the cast members, when interviewed, have said Hawks ran the entire show. Perhaps, as Science Fiction films were not highly regarded in the early 50s, he felt his reputation might suffer if he acknowledged his contribution; perhaps he thought it might help Nyby's credentials if he were given credit for this masterfully crafted tale. Who knows? But rest assured...this IS a Howard Hawks film!
The story, based on John Campbell's short story, 'Who Goes There?', is a nifty, claustrophobic tale of a group of soldiers and scientists in the Arctic, discovering a giant 'flying saucer' under the ice. When the ship blows up during the excavation, the 'pilot', a huge green chlorophyll-based humanoid (played by a young James Arness), is recovered, frozen in a block of ice. Bringing the ice-encased figure back to the base, it is then accidentally thawed out...and all Hell brakes loose!
While the cast lacks big-name stars, each actor is wonderful, delivering wryly funny Hawks' dialogue at a breakneck pace. The military commander, Capt. Hendry (Kenneth Tobey), is a no-nonsense boss, respected and lovingly chided by his men, led by Dewey Martin, who constantly try to 'set him up' with a pretty scientist he had 'struck out' with, on a recent 'leave' (Margaret Sheridan).
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48 of 51 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Back when flying saucers roamed the earth . . . May 4, 2003
Format:VHS Tape
This is a great movie. The earlier reviews do a nice job of summarizing the plot and characters, and the isolated world of this little Arctic base really does capture the viewer's interest, however implausible the notion of the world under attack by a giant vegetable. What makes this film especially enjoyable is the interplay between the characters, who represent the classic sci-fi melange of a brave military officer, his irreverent but loyal crew, intellectuals and scientists devoted to the pursuit of knowledge even when it places the whole group in danger, and of course, a very smart and beautiful woman who serves coffee because she decides she wants to, not because it's just the thing that the woman is supposed to do. Combine a solid cast with a fast-paced dialogue, and a great visual experience, and you have an entertaining movie that works. Apparently it wasn't much of a hit when it was first released at the height of Cold War tension in 1951, when the Korean War was still raging and people were still talking about flying saucers after the 1947 Roswell incident (whatever THAT was all about!), but it stands up very well 50 years later, especially when it is compared to some of the other sci-fi films of that period (and no, I won't bring up "Robot Monster" here). Great film; break out the popcorn and soda and have fun!
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184 of 209 people found the following review helpful
Format:VHS Tape|Verified Purchase
"The Thing From Another World" remains the best of the 1950's black & white science fiction films, avoiding both the fake monsters of "Them," its ideological counterpart, and the piety of "The Day the Earth Stood Still." I still remember the first time I saw this movie and realized that here were characters who talked as fast as I did. I know Robert Altman and "M*A*S*H" get the credit for "inventing" over-lapping dialogue, but that seems a bit absurd to me after watching the conversation and group discussions throughout this film. I am teaching a Science Fiction literature class for the first time this semester and I wanted them to also watch an example of a classic 1950s science fiction film and this film was my immediate choice.
As John Carpenter reminded us in his 1982 "remake," the 1951 version is not even remotely faithful to John W. Campbell, Jr.'s classic sci-fi short story, "Who Goes There?" Campbell wrote of a stranger visitor from another planet who could take on human appearance, so that the problem was that you never knew if the guy sitting next to you was your buddy or the monster. "The Thing" offers a monster from outer space, but with atmosphere, pacing and wit rarely seen on the silver screen. Charles Lederer gets screen credit for the script, but we know know both Howard Hawks and Ben Hecht had a hand in the writing as well (you can find Lederer's original script on line to check out the differences for yourself), and it has been taken as gospel for years that Hawks had some hand in the direction as well (as did Orson Welles according to some). After all, this was Christian Nyby's first screen credit as a director and he went on to direct mostly television series from "Gunsmoke" to "Kojak.
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22 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars At Last - The Complete Version !!! January 12, 2002
Format:VHS Tape
The Thing (From Another World) has always been one of the best of the 50's science fiction films. Now acknowledged as having been directed by Howard Hawks (although he only took a producer credit to help his film editor Christian Nyby), it contains all of the best elements of Hawks' works - the comradarie of the group solving a mutual problem and the strong woman who invades the group and falls for their leader (see Only Angels Have Wings and Rio Bravo, among others). The movie works on several genre levels, including sci fi, haunted house horror, adventure, war picture, etc. There is even a school of thought that the scientific leader was proposing Communistic ideas regarding The Thing that were resisted by the Army fliers, as represented by their patriotic American leader Captain Patrick Hendry (Patrick Henry?).
The problem with any VHS video release up until now has been the deletion of approximately seven minutes of the movie, including the famous bondage scene between Kenneth Tobey and Margaret Sheridan. This was quite significant for a movie that only ran 87 minutes originally but also deprived Margaret Sheridan of enough screen time to justify her receiving top billing. The 50th anniversary edition not only restores all the missing footage (available for years on laserdisc only) but only shines in a newly remastered print.
For anyone who despairs of today's "Blood and Guts" sci fi and horror films that have been bankrupt of imagination for years, this a return to a time when a small budget and unknown cast didn't necessarily mean a poor picture.
Now that my wishes have been granted, I only have one question left. When can we expect the DVD?
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Extra footage from "The Thing"?
I saw the film when it first came out as a kid. There was a scene [which really imprinted on me] where the door to the greenhouse is opened and two airmen are hanging upside down like so many sheep. I have never seen this again. When viewing the film again at the Biograph in Georgetown, D.C.,... Read More
Aug 4, 2008 by J. Clawson |  See all 4 posts
Well done but faulty movie is The Thing! Read!
The original "The Thing" was shot on a small budget (which is reflected in the casting and sets of the film itself). The size of the budget or scope of the film really has nothing to do with whether a film is a classic or not.
Jan 28, 2008 by Wayne Klein |  See all 2 posts
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