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97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know: Collective Wisdom from the Experts Paperback – February 12, 2009

ISBN-13: 978-0596522698 ISBN-10: 059652269X Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 222 pages
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (February 12, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 059652269X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0596522698
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (33 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #496,780 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Book Description

Collective Wisdom from the Experts

About the Author

Richard Monson-Haefel , an independent software developer, coauthored all five editions of Enterprise JavaBeans and Java Message Service (all O'Reilly). He's a software architect specializing in multi-touch interfaces and a leading expert on enterprise computing. More detail on his work and writings can be found at www.monson-haefel.com.


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Customer Reviews

97 Things you already knew, but had to discover from this book.
Hemanth Kumar
Seem's like the publisher is taking a sharp cut out of your pocket, which is why I got this bad boy for cheap at a used book sale.
David
Thus this would also be a suitable read for a manager working with a large team of software architects.
calvinnme

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

119 of 123 people found the following review helpful By Rao Venugopal on July 21, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Heavy on keywords and low on actual content / value.

Imagine your Dad rings you up and says, "Be sure to go to work bright and early..." or "The early bird gets the worm" and proceeds to ramble on for 5 minutes about why that is important. We have all been through this kind of lecture. For politeness sake, you bite your tongue and zone out.

Now replace Dad with Bill Gates/ Steve Jobs/ some famous architect. However the advice being doled out is similar. eg. "Be sure to have a decent UI for every component/ blah blah blah".
How would you feel if you had to read 97 articles by famous architects / tech gurus, each 2 pages long and the entire content of the article is in the first introductory line itself. The rest is fluff.
I don't know about you, but when I am paying 20+ dollars for a book, I expect more than simple fluff.

-V
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75 of 78 people found the following review helpful By Charles D. Sewell on August 5, 2009
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This book is just an accumulation random advice collected for "free" off a blog. You will feel like you have read a bunch of fotune cookies (i.e. "The longest trip begins with a single step") on the topic of architecture. Not a single topic is explored in depth since each topic is only 2 pages in length.

I would not recommend this book.
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30 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Gernot Starke on December 25, 2009
Format: Paperback
Why does a famous (and, he has proven it, excellent) technical writer dare to compile
such a useless, incoherent and impractical amount of pseudo-advice?

His other books provided deep technical knowledge and practical help.

This one's not worth its price - there are much better books available...

alternatives: Taylor et al: Software Architecture (Foundations, Theory and Practice): Great read.
Bass et. al: Software Architecture in Practice: Great read.
Buschmann et. al: Pattern-oriented Software Architecture: Great series.
Fowler: Patterns of Enterprise Application Architecture: Great, highly practical...

So - don't bother with this one, go get a good book :-)
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38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By C. Roeder on July 5, 2009
Format: Paperback
I found many of the contributions interesting, but wished for more detail. Many are not much longer than a page and left me wanting.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By brian d foy VINE VOICE on August 7, 2009
Format: Paperback
[97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know] is much more broad than most people would expect from its title. It's certainly true to its title, but I expected that it would have be 97 things software architects should know about software architecture. Many of the points, while good advice otherwise, aren't special to software or software architecture. They are points any manager, project leader, or executive could apply. It's really 97 Things Every Project Manager Should Know, although there's already a book for that.

The first thing every software architect should know is what is expected from that job title, and I was hoping someone would at least try to define it. In reality, the title is a dumping ground for the tasks you don't give to the programmers but don't trust to the executives, and the job description varies widely.

My notion that nobody really knows what a software architect should do is reinforced by reading the advice from the many contributing experts, each of which briefly write about what they think is important. Some of that advice conflicts with other contributors, is so general so that the it would suitable in any business book, or merely shows that anyone touching a keyboard might be labelled a "software architect".

I was surprised that a lot of the advice tried to actually force the commoditization of "software architect", as if the actual person doing the job was interchangeable. An architect's experience, vision, and artistry should be at the center of the endevour. Architects are not cogs; they create and enforce the philosophy and design concept. In that regard, I actually only know a handful of software architects.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By ac in DC on January 12, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you buy this book expecting 97 in depth dissertations on software architecture & design, you will be disappointed. It is instead, a collection of observations on the relationships between business, people and technology. This is not a tome that one sits down and reads in a day, acquiring all of the knowledge of the collected contributors in that instant. It is instead a book, which is best read a chapter or two at a time, and discussed amongst your colleagues. Some lessons you will be able to implement immediately, some will not be of value to you ever. Many deal with issues that (as one would expect) will help to make your life easier if implemented in the planning stages of a project. The only thing I would change so far would be to change "Your Customer Is Not Your Customer" to "Your Customer Is Not Your Only Customer" or "Everyone Is A Customer".

I give it 4 stars instead of 5 because as others have noted, it is very lightweight. I do feel that this book would be suitable for most folks in technology to read, not limited to software architects. I would have no hesitation recommending this book to everyone from a Junior Systems Administrator or Project Manager all the way to a Director Of Technology.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Hemanth Kumar on May 22, 2011
Format: Paperback
97 Things you already knew, but had to discover from this book. It's OK if you could rent it at your library for casual browsing. To actually buy this book would be a blunder. Like someone earlier mentioned, most of the free Blogs offer better advices and with greater illustration (not the literal type). It is so rudimentary, even a junior programmer with some common sense already knows most of the "enlightened" observations.
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