Brotherhood 3 Seasons 2007

Amazon Instant Video

Season 2
Available on Prime
(130) IMDb 7.6/10
Available in HDAvailable on Prime

10. Things Have Changed 1:7-8 TV-MA CC

Freddie asks Nozzoli to kill Michael; Tommy makes a bid for the Speaker's chair; Eileen puts her foot down about Dana.

Starring:
Jason Isaacs, Jason Clarke
Runtime:
53 minutes
Original air date:
December 2, 2007

Available to watch on supported devices.

Things Have Changed 1:7-8

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Season 2
Available on Prime

Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Ed Bianchi
Starring Jason Isaacs, Jason Clarke
Supporting actors Annabeth Gish, Ethan Embry, Kevin Chapman, Fiona C. Erickson, Brían F. O'Byrne, Fionnula Flanagan, Karl Bury, Janel Moloney, Matt Servitto, Helen Carey, Tina Benko, Tony V., Al Sapienza, Billy Smith, Len Cariou, Brian Scannell, Frank Ridley, Georgia Lyman
Season year 2007
Network Showtime
Producers Donna E. Bloom, Adam Roberts
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

Well written and great acting.
roger duncan
Brotherhood - It was the best series we have seen in a long time.
Delia DeChime
This is a good guys vs. bad guys type of show.
AnnieL

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Wesley Mullins on January 8, 2008
The first season of Showtime's dark, brooding Brotherhood spent time exploring its main characters, often at the expense of plot. So much of what most people loved about the first season involved the family dynamics, the personal struggle and angst and the fine line between love and hate. Just seeing the characters in their unique positions in life sufficed for a larger story.

The second season really couldn't repeat that. Viewers now know these characters and expected more concrete plots to accompany the character studies. Several long plots appear throughout the season, even though at times, the series feels misguided and directionless. The primary stories focus on Michael's physical, mental and emotional recovery from his beating at the end of Season, Tommy's tit-for-tat affair and the arrival of the Caffee's cousin Colin, a blue collar Irishman bent on reconnecting with his American family, including the father he never knew.

That last plot comes with a heavy price for most fans of the first season. To make room for Colin, the writers eliminated Michael's right hand Pete, a viewer favorite. Colin takes his place alongside Michael, performing his dirty work. Although a deeper more flexible character, Colin lacks the warmth and humanity of Pete, and the show suffers because of the trade.

Another change from Season 1 is the downward spiral of Declan. Along with his non-existent relationship with his wife, Declan's drug abuse worsens, and he finds himself in a moral neverland at work, having to betray the trust of his friends to keep his shield. Declan's duplicity is never better displayed than in the season's best episode, when he bribes voters to help re-elect Tommy, all with the approval of his supervisors who want the Caffee's blood.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By N. Durham HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on September 24, 2008
Format: DVD
Showtime's Irish answer to The Sopranos; Brotherhood manages to get better and better with each passing episode, and the second season is no different. Picking up a while after the first season concluded, season two begins with the Caffee family picking up the pieces. Michael (Jason Isaacs) is recovering from the brutal beating he took at last season's finale, and coping with the unexpected mental side effects to boot, all the while still trying to stay in the semi-good graces of crime boss Freddie Cork (Kevin Chapman). His politician brother Tommy (Jason Clarke) continues the campaign trail, and is drawn further and further away from his wife Eileen (Annabeth Gish) after learning of her infidelities. Things get even more complicated for the Caffee's when their estranged Irish cousin Colin (Brian F. O'Byrne) returns to The Hill to reconnect with the family, much to the chagrin of Michael and Tommy's mother Rose (the excellent Fionnula Flanagan). Also in this season, we witness the descent of cop Declan (Ethan Embry) whose life continues to spiral out of control. While there isn't anything on Brotherhood that hasn't been seen before, it still manages to provide plenty of entertainment for fans of gangster crime-dramas and back-office politics. Not to mention that by the time the season concludes, you'll be salivating for more. All in all, Brotherhood still manages to get better and better with each passing episode, and here's hoping that the best is yet to come.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By N. Durham HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on August 25, 2008
Showtime's Irish answer to The Sopranos; Brotherhood manages to get better and better with each passing episode, and the second season is no different. Picking up a while after the first season concluded, season two begins with the Caffee family picking up the pieces. Michael (Jason Isaacs) is recovering from the brutal beating he took at last season's finale, and coping with the unexpected mental side effects to boot, all the while still trying to stay in the semi-good graces of crime boss Freddie Cork (Kevin Chapman). His politician brother Tommy (Jason Clarke) continues the campaign trail, and is drawn further and further away from his wife Eileen (Annabeth Gish) after learning of her infidelities. Things get even more complicated for the Caffee's when their estranged Irish cousin Colin (Brian F. O'Byrne) returns to The Hill to reconnect with the family, much to the chagrin of Michael and Tommy's mother Rose (the excellent Fionnula Flanagan). Also in this season, we witness the descent of cop Declan (Ethan Embry) whose life continues to spiral out of control. While there isn't anything on Brotherhood that hasn't been seen before, it still manages to provide plenty of entertainment for fans of gangster crime-dramas and back-office politics. Not to mention that by the time the season concludes, you'll be salivating for more. All in all, Brotherhood still manages to get better and better with each passing episode, and here's hoping that the best is yet to come.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Cole R. Patterson on February 7, 2009
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Having gobbled up the first series on DVD box set from Amazon I was almost like a junkie waiting for my fix of series 2.
The characters are so well drawn in this series that you feel compelled to worry about their wellbeing, even the devious Michael Caffey.
Every character is well drawn even the bit players make the overall piece work sublimely.
Tommy's marriage now on shaky ground and Michael, recovering from the beat down he recieved in series one is trying to reclaim his territory once again from Freddie Cork.
His romance with Kathleen is under immense pressure due to his instability and his predictability has taken a turn for the worse.
Tommys reliance on old friends seems to be looking less reliable and he is learning that life in politics on the Hill can be as dangerous a game as any his brother plays.
Declans character takes on a major role in this season and if you didn't feel for him in series one you sure do by the end of series two.
The subplot of the attempted entrapment of Marty Trio and Freddie Cork heats up and so does the action with both the Caffey brothers fighting for their survival in their chosen arenas.
And like all good Irish families it's all held together by the love of a good mother, Rose, who has her battles to deal with as she comes to terms with her own ageing.
All the women in this series are so well drawn and strong they could almost carry the show on their own.
But like all good series it takes a well defined and acted cast to make you want to watch and I for one cannot wait for seazon 3 to start down here in Australia.
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