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All Things Must Pass

George HarrisonAudio CD
4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (582 customer reviews)


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Biography

Over a period of decades, George Harrison earned a reputation as one of the most enigmatic and creative individuals born to rock and roll. As signaled by his first post-Beatles release, 1970’s epic All Things Must Pass, here was a man with a story all his own. His list of accomplishments is long and eclectic in its scope.

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 25, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 2
  • Label: Capitol
  • ASIN: B000002UCQ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (582 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #203,907 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Disc: 1
1. I'd Have You Anytime
2. My Sweet Lord
3. Wah-Wah
4. Isn't It A Pity (Version One)
5. What Is Life
6. If Not For You
7. Behind That Locked Door
8. Let It Down
9. Run Of The Mill
10. Beware Of Darkness
See all 14 tracks on this disc
Disc: 2
1. I Dig Love
2. Art Of Dying
3. Isn't It A Pity (Version Two)
4. Hear Me Lord
5. Out Of The Blue
6. It's Johnny's Birthday
7. Plug Me In
8. I Remember Jeep
9. Thanks For The Pepperoni

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

On the heels of "Something" and "While My Guitar Gently Weeps," George Harrison must have felt he had little to prove as a songwriter. But unfortunately for him, those stellar efforts were in service of a band whose main songwriters were named Lennon and McCartney. But when the Beatles partnership dissolved in 1970, Harrison wasted little time in showcasing the body of work he'd accumulated the previous two years--or in trying to take Abbey Road's lavish production ethos to its next logical plateau. The resulting late-1970 double-album (originally released with a third bonus disc of instrumental "Apple Jams," which are still included here) was perhaps the most Beatles-sounding post-Fabs effort, a far cry from the two quirky solo efforts he'd undertaken while still in the band (the authentically Indian Wonderwall Music and the Moog wank-fest Electronic Sounds). Tracks like "Beware of Darkness," "All Things Must Pass," "The Art of Dying," "Isn't It a Pity," and the hit "My Sweet Lord" gave the album a strong spiritual center, balanced by the light-hearted "Apple Scruffs," "If Not For You," and the Bob Dylan collaboration "I'd Have You Anytime." Phil Spector's mammoth, orchestrally laced production took his trademark "wall of sound" to impressive new levels, all the more remarkable in light of the biting, minimalist work he was collaborating with John Lennon on, virtually simultaneously. Far and away Harrison's masterpiece; he'd have been wise to have saved a few of these songs for a rainy day. Jerry McCulley

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
204 of 217 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Harrison Breaks Out January 23, 2001
Format:Audio CD
The original cd release of this album was marred by a muddy and hissy sound that took away from the great music. Finally after years of clamoring from fans, George Harrison has issued a remastered version of his classic All Things Must Pass. The results are outstanding as the songs sound clear and fresh. George Harrison was the Beatle who most immediately benefited from the band's breakup. Mr. Harrison was stifled by the domination of the Lennon-McCartney songwriting partnership and was only allowed a song or two per album. The songs that did appear, like "Taxman", Here Comes The Sun" & "While My Guitar Gently Weeps", showed that he was an excellent songwriter in his own right. When it came time to record his first proper solo album, he released an album of electronic noise called Wonderwall in 1968, he had such a backlog of material it yielded a double album with a third bonus disk. The songs are deeply rooted in the Maharisi's teachings that have been a large part of his life for the past thirty years. Despite the religious musings, the songs have an upbeat, full sound lead by Wall of Sound producer Phil Spector. Although Mr. Spector does sometimes overproduce songs, he makes a song like "My Sweet Lord" that could have been plodding and ponderous into a soaring affirmation. Of course that song was a huge number one hit, but others standouts include the beautiful cover of Bob Dylan's "If Not For You", the nice tribute to fans who hung outside the Apple Records offices, "Apple Scruffs", the yin and yang of "I Dig Love" and "The Art Of Dying" and the rollicking "Wah-Wah". "What Is Life?" may well be the best song he has ever done with it's blaring horns, layered guitars and smooth vocals. Read more ›
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96 of 101 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars George's Greatest! February 14, 2005
Format:Audio CD
"All Things Must Pass" was George Harrison's first real solo album ( the previous only contained instrumentals). Most of the songs were written while the Beatles were still existing, and George was writing so many great songs during the final years of the 1960's that, when the Beales finally folded in early 1970, he had songs enough for a double album. Eventually it turned out to be a triple album, with the 3rd record containing "jams" with George and his good friends, such as Eric Clapton, Dave Mason, Carl Radle and Jim Gordon.

Like most Harrison fans I regard "ATMP" as George finest album. Many of his greatest songs come from this LP. Though there is a great variety of styles and moods on the album, particularly the ballads stand out. Songs like "Isn't It a Pity", "Run of the Mill", "Behind That Locked Door", "Beware of Darkness" and "I'd Have You Anytime" are simply moving. His version of Dylan's "If Not For You" beats Dylan's own version by miles. Among the other up-beat number I especially like "What is Life". The bonus-track "I Live For You" is gem; incredible that this song was not originally included.

A lot of the acoustic guitars are played by Badfinger's Pete Ham and Tom Evans, who were two young very talented song-writers themselves and who had already witten the classic "Without You" at this time. For Pete Ham, who wrote Badfinger' greatest hit-records, Harrison may have been the biggest inspiration among the Beatles. There are many similarities among these two great musicians' songwriting and musical arrangements. Try listen to Badfinger's "Straight Up" album, which was partly produced by George.

This 2 CD set is must have for any Beatles or Badfinger fan!
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57 of 59 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars JUST THE FACTS... January 26, 2001
By RHN
Format:Audio CD
You all already know what music comprises this album so I will just write about the superior sonic quality of this re-issue and the new tracks issued for this release. It is a must have for anyone who enjoyed this album the first time around. Apparently, Harrison re-equalised and worked from the original 2-track master, but you can swear he re-mixed the entire album. The highs are crisper, the lows are punchier. It sounds GGRRREEEAAAT!!! "I LIVE FOR YOU" is far superior to any bootleg cd out their and the most completed version to date. The acoustic only out-takes of "Beware of Darkness" and "Let It Roll" are reminiscient of The Beatles Anthology release of "While My Guitar Gently Weeps". The music only mix of "What Is Life?" and the extra cornet horns is interesting but much too busy for the intro. The re-recorded version of "My Sweet Lord (2000)" is an interesting arraingment. To each his own. The liner notes, written by George, are informative and thoughtful as George can be. I just wish he wrote a little more. All in all, the packaging is great with a 20 page booklet containing alternate photos from the original re-lease some 30 years ago! plus lyrics,musicians,ETC. An interesting side note, George mentions a then 19 year-old named Phil Collins playing congas on "The Art Of Dying". This collection is truly fascinating and a aural pleasure!!!! Get it, and PLAY LOUD!!!!!!!!!
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Paradoxical Masterpiece September 13, 2002
Format:Audio CD
With this triumph, George Harrison proved without a shadow of a doubt that he had shed the Beatles years long before the 1970 breakup. His spiritual journey had begun years earlier, yet his uncomfortable status as a Beatle prevented him from releasing these intensely personal songs on a Beatles record. Harrison makes a statement with both lyric and melody with "All Things Must Pass." This collection of songs, most of which were written years earlier and kept in Harrison's hope chest, provide proof of his desire to go beyond what any artist had, or has, in discovery of the meaning of life. Here, George profoundly shed his image as simply a Beatles in grand fashion.
This album works because we are not hammered with a collection of spiritual songs from his unusual, yet thought provoking personal religious beliefs. There are those strange moments such as with the song "My Sweet Lord" and its references to, in Harrison's own words, a God with many branches known as religions. This mixture of Christianity and Hinduism are odd to say the least, however songs such as "If Not For You" and "What is Life" could just as easily have been crafted for a serious earthly love affair or a spiritual relationship with God. In a way Harrison leaves us confused as to his message but we yearn for more.
This mystery leads Harrison to ask the listener to contemplate life; to think about life's joys and sorrows, love and disappointment. The slick Wall-of-Sound production quality, provided by Phil Spector, profoundly adds to the spirituality of this gem. Without it, the album would sound like that of an acoustic troubadour rather than a grand creator coming down to greet his creation. Harrison had come a long way since his first released song, "Don't Bother Me.
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars It's also a great mantra
GREAT compilation. I love GH.
Published 5 days ago by L. B.
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Probably his best...own this.
Published 6 days ago by William R Dennison
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent Remaster
Perfection.
Published 16 days ago by Jeff Bates
5.0 out of 5 stars All Things Must Pass, says it all.
I couldn't ask for a better rondevous' with my past, a fantastic, exciting listening experience in my present and I'm so looking forward to many pleasurable hours of George's sweet... Read more
Published 16 days ago by momoon
5.0 out of 5 stars jcf
Blast from my past that I'm enjoying very much. This seller sent a product in perfect shape, well packaged. Read more
Published 19 days ago by jf
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Ok
Published 22 days ago by Rocky
5.0 out of 5 stars We love it.
George Harrison. What more is there to say?! We love it.
Published 26 days ago by Nancy Nice
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Love George's music, I have this on vinyl.
Published 26 days ago by Heather G Picher
5.0 out of 5 stars Very nice!
Very nice to get the CD/remastered version of this amazing album I first bought as a 3 LP box set when it was first released in 1970. Read more
Published 1 month ago by Dr. Sound Good
5.0 out of 5 stars The best post Beatles follow up
Harrison must have known it (at least I hope). He did it. He accomplished it. Hard to refute. Most sublime and still excessive work in all of rock history. Listen to it. Read more
Published 2 months ago by Lincoln Duncan
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What's the difference?
Digipak (or Digipack)
Digipak is a brand name for a form of CD packaging that replaces the traditional plastic jewel box. Digipacks (the standard term) feature a plastic tray glued to a card sleeve and are somewhat slimmer than jewel boxes
Oct 2, 2006 by Joseph A. Gabriel |  See all 3 posts
All things must pass: Phil Spector
This CD reissue, released in 2001 for the album's 30th anniversary, features all of the original songs as they were first heard in 1970. In his liner notes George writes: "It was difficult to resist re-mixing every track. All these years later I would like to liberate some of the songs from... Read More
Aug 14, 2008 by John M. Kertis |  See all 9 posts
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