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Things That Cannot Be Shaken: Holding Fast to Your Faith in a Relativistic World Paperback – April 24, 2008

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"The authors make vivid the two-way street of our communion with God and God's being with us. Their book is full of things that we today need urgently to take to heart."
J. I. Packer, Board of Governors' Professor of Theology, Regent College

About the Author

K. Scott Oliphint (PhD, Westminster Theological Seminary) is professor of apologetics and systematic theology at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia and has written numerous scholarly articles and books, including God With Us. He is also the co-editor of the two-volume Christian Apologetics Past and Present: A Primary Source Reader and Revelation and Reason: New Essays in Reformed Apologetics.

Rod Mays is the national coordinator of Reformed University Fellowship, the campus ministry of the Presbyterian Church in America. He has also served as senior pastor of Presbyterian churches in South Carolina, Mississippi, and West Virginia.

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Crossway (April 24, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1581348495
  • ISBN-13: 978-1581348491
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.6 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 6.4 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #768,967 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Erik Raymond on September 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
Believers are often the question is asked by the skeptic, "How do you know what you believe is right?" This is increasingly true today with reality of a culture baptized in relativism. Christians then, ought to have an answer.

K.Scott Oliphant and Rod Mays aim to help Christians better answer such questions in their new book Things that Cannot be Shaken. The book flows out of the hymn by John Newton, Glorious things of Thee are Spoken. The authors walk through the hymn and interact with Scripture to reinforce biblical truth.

It seems, though not stated explicitly, that the book is written for those in the university scene. If this was not the intention then it is an ideal application. Those believers who are interacting with worldviews on college campuses must have some basic things nailed down.

One of these things is the issue of authority. I love that Oliphant and Mays attack this first, for it is the basis for reason and discussion. In the context of asking questions like, "But what about the Koran? What about the Book of Mormon? Is there really only one way to God?" The authors state:

"The problem posed in reconciling biblical truth with apparent contradictions in experience of course, is the problem of authority. This problem is not a new one."

What I really enjoyed about this book is the explicit gospel-centeredness of it. The authors were continually reminding me of the cross and the gifts that were purchased. They talked much about the Holy Spirit, the battle of sanctification, and the joy of salvation. So in this sense it is not so much a book on apologetics but a book on the greatness of the realities of the gospel, which then becomes an informed and passionate apologetic.

I enjoyed the writers' style in this book.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By David A. Vosseller on August 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
"Therefore let us be grateful for receiving a kingdom that cannot be shaken, and thus let us offer to God acceptable worship, with reverence and awe, for our God is a consuming fire." - Heb. 12:28-29.

The Scripture verses above and the great hymn by John Newton, "Glorious Things of Thee Are Spoken", inspired Westminster Seminary professor K. Scott Oliphint and RUF national campus ministry coordinator Rod Mays to write this book: Things That Cannot Be Shaken: Holding Fast to Your Faith in a Relativistic World. Their purpose in writing it, as a recent interview states it, "is to put an easy and concise read into the hands of young (or older) men and women struggling with the issues of authority and purpose, or who find themselves serving in an environment where questions about authority and purpose are prevalent in daily conversations and circumstances."

In the book itself, the authors state that they are concerned that "there seems to be a significant gap in the ability of most today to synthesize the truth of the Bible with what we see around us. Because of this inability, the Bible is reduced to the level of helpful personal advice and inspirational thought." (pp. 19).

It is hard to categorize this book, but it is best described as an attempt to strengthen all believers in their trust and confidence in God, His Word, and His provision for His people. There are only five chapters, each deriving their titles from lines from Newton's hymn. And the chapters also build on one another to show the power of the Gospel for us today, and tries to answer the questions that many believers wrestle with in their hearts. Is Christianity true and is God's word really a valid source of authority? If it is true, how do we apply it to our lives and can it make a difference?
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By E. Johnson on January 20, 2009
Format: Paperback
Today's world is a place where ultimate truth is too often disparaged and minimalized. In fact, many skeptics belittle the idea that there is such a thing as exclusive truth, especially when it comes to religion. In Things That Cannot be Shaken, Reformed thinkers K. Scott Oliphint and Rod Mays use the Bible as the central foundational source to show that there are certain things we can know for sure, including God's blueprint for life.

Basing each chapter on stanzas from the 1779 John Newton hymn, "Glorious Things of Thee are Spoken," the authors begin their work by stressing the overall authority of the written Scripture. Utilizing a presuppositional apologetic viewpoint, they propose that the Bible--"not our senses and our mental faculties"--should be the ultimate authority or "we will be forever confused and confounded with the issues that press in on us every day" (p. 32).

Once the Scripture is accepted as the foundation, the believer must understand that fulfillment in life only comes through following God. Those desiring the things contrary to God end up resorting to sins such as using drugs, drinking to excess, and even cutting parts of one's own body with razor blades. "We must worship something," the authors write on page 54. "And if our misdiagnosis of our felt needs leads us to pursue something created rather than the Creator, then we will attach ourselves to that creating thing religiously. We will, in fact, worship it."

One of the more challenging chapters of the book was titled, "We are not alone." The authors believe that there are too many distractions in life, including "time-saving technology" that ends up eating up more time rather than conserving it. Even too many church activities can get in the way.
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